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Running boards
#11
(07-17-2017, 03:02 PM)Txjaybird Wrote: In SD in bad/icy weather I stepped forward out of my fullsized Bronco onto the running board, both feet shot out from under me.  My back/spine hit the running board on the way down.  I was bruised and banged up for weeks.  Even now I prefer backing out of my van with a firm grip on the passenger assist handle.

You just learned the '3 point' method of exiting a large/tall vehicle.

We are taught to use that method of exiting and entering the cab in the trucking industry, more truckers are hurt climbing in or out of the truck than any other on-the-job injury.

It's particularly prevalent in winter, with ice buildup on the steps and exterior grab handles.
---Brian

Republic of Texas
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#12
I don't really need a running board for the drivers or passenger door because It's not that hard to grab the assist handle and climb up or down. But the sliding door is another story. Even though there is a grab handle to help get in and out it is a fairly big step to get in. When I'm camping or working on the van I have a small step stool which works great. I didn't think I would ever even want a running board there but I find myself thinking it might be a good idea. Only problem is I installed a grey water tank under the slider and now I don't think there is enough room to install the running board.

But if you can find one to fit your van I would go for it. I think they make quite a difference. I would also second looking at the salvage yards to see if you can pick one up cheap.
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#13
Salvage yards charge $40 for each side, and even then, fabricating is needed. A nice angle diamond plate covering the cab to the body would be ideal.

How about posting a fabricating "gig" on Craigslist. Some creative guy might take up the task. Many people needing a "one time" offering of yard cleaning, mowing done once.
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#14
Well...this is a small place, looked in two junk yards....found nothing.

Called around. Nothing.

Ok... so, I'll check out each link provided by folks here. Guess I am going to have to "settle" for something. The "floor" of the beast come up to almost my waist, the seat is at my armpits. Just cannot get in from the front!

It ain't easy being short.
"I never saw a sight that didn't look better looking back"

1988 Honeywell.  E350 chassis   21'
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#15
(07-17-2017, 04:27 PM)tx2sturgis Wrote: You just learned the '3 point' method of exiting a large/tall vehicle.

We are taught to use that method of exiting and entering the cab in the trucking industry, more truckers are hurt climbing in or out of the truck than any other on-the-job injury.

It's particularly prevalent in winter, with ice buildup on the steps and exterior grab handles.

I guess my usual means of exiting a cabover was more daredevil than safe/smart  Rolleyes Just reach out grab a handle swing out and around facing the cab as you control your slide to the ground with one or both hands on the grab bars/handles.  I don't know why  I've lived as long as I have without breaking some bones.  I've worked my guardian angel overtime for sure.

Jewellann
      I Can't Believe I Shaved My Legs For This..... Rolleyes .....Jo Dee Messina
               That's All I Have To Say About That.........Forrest Gump 
                          I'm Not Here Dodgy  You Didn't See Me     
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#16
(Yesterday, 01:27 AM)Txjaybird Wrote: I guess my usual means of exiting a cabover was more daredevil than safe/smart  Rolleyes Just reach out grab a handle swing out and around facing the cab as you control your slide to the ground with one or both hands on the grab bars/handles.  I don't know why  I've lived as long as I have without breaking some bones.  I've worked my guardian angel overtime for sure.

Jewellann

Ok...cool....you drove...

Yeah back in the cabover days with long vertical handles outside the cab, right behind the doors, we all did that. Plus I was younger, and falling didnt hurt as much, or for as long.

But now, most on-highway Class 8 trucks are designed for aerodynamics, and fuel mileage, and the grab handles are shorter and mounted low inside the door frame. This has pretty much stopped the 'tarzan swing'...plus a lot of us drivers are older and it pays to not get hurt out there.

I still see younger drivers jump out of the driver seat without using their hands, and sooner or later those drivers will stumble and pick themselves up from the ground, (or not) and realize something: Gravity works.
---Brian

Republic of Texas
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