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Wire keeps coming loose
#1
I have a converter for when I need to plug into mains, something like this:

http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/cfp/e...5-9008.htm?

I've since learned it might not be the best thing to use for this purpose, but I only need it a few times a year so I'm sticking with it. The problem is the wire leading to it comes loose every couple of years. Bare wire goes into those holes at the lower right and set screws push down on it. The wire I'm using has very thick strands and either the wire is flattening out over time or the screw is coming loose just enough.

Is there a type of connector I should be putting on that wire or should I put locktite on the screw? Has anyone else run into this type of problem? I've been tightening it down as hard as I feel comfortable and zip tied the wires in place so they shouldn't be wiggling or pulling away.
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#2
Those set screws are designed for use with solid wire, not stranded.  Was me, I'd use a couple of butt splices to attach an inch or two of solid wire to the ends of the stranded wire and run the set screws down on that.
Regards
John

Life is not about discovering yourself.  Life is about creating yourself!

Talk is cheap because of simple economics: The supply FAR exceeds the demand!
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#3
(04-21-2017, 01:13 AM)Reducto Wrote: I have a converter for when I need to plug into mains, something like this:

http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/cfp/e...5-9008.htm?

Hi,

I read your post and was curious what a converter is. The Internet revealed it converts AC to DC. I know INverters are placed between batteries and wall plugs to turn the battery's power into AC. I'm confused then how a converter is used. Is there a device you plug into an AC socket which goes through a CONverter to charge a battery?

Also, what makes a circuit component considered part of "mains?"

Thanks
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#4
Reducto
Those set screws will work their way loose even on a solid wire when used in a moving vehicle and a good thing to check/tighten every 6 months or so.
Look in the breaker box too if you have one...
What you are experiencing is typical . Check more often on stranded wire.


Bucket
CONverters are used to power all your 12 volt devices and keep the battery topped off while you have AC hookups or are on generator. (Most of them are not too good at doing this perfectly.) They are plugged into your rig's AC .
Stay Tuned
popeye

1981 Travelcraft Class C - 23'
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iambucket (04-21-2017)
#5
(04-21-2017, 06:14 AM)iambucket Wrote: Hi,

I read your post and was curious what a converter is. The Internet revealed it converts AC to DC. I know INverters are placed between batteries and wall plugs to turn the battery's power into AC. I'm confused then how a converter is used. Is there a device you plug into an AC socket which goes through a CONverter to charge a battery?

Also, what makes a circuit component considered part of "mains?"

Thanks

The converter takes AC [shore] power and does two things (at least in my RV). It trickle charges the batteries and it provides 12V power to the 12V devices like lights and stereo etc so they don't have to pull power from the batteries. If I'm plugged in for a long time I'll unhook my battery system and the converter continues to provide power for my 12V system.
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iambucket (04-21-2017)
#6
In this case, when Reducto is talking about "mains", he means plugged into shore power.

Come to think of it "electrical mains" is a British usage.  You a Brit, Reducto?

Anyway, with conventional motorhones and travel trailers, many circuits - lights, water pump, roof vent fans, etc. - are 12 volt only.  A converter is a 12 volt power supply that provides power to these when the RV is parked in a campground and plugged in to shore power.  Any excess power it provides goes to recharge the house battery when it's low.

Converters don't typically have a plug.  They are hardwired to a circuit breaker in the RVs ac fuse box.
Regards
John

Life is not about discovering yourself.  Life is about creating yourself!

Talk is cheap because of simple economics: The supply FAR exceeds the demand!
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The following 1 user says Thank You to Optimistic Paranoid for this post:
iambucket (04-21-2017)
#7
Thanks for the answers. For some reason I thought that shore power was DC and was erroneously trying to figure out how a converter would work from the battery's OUTPUT side instead of INPUT.
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#8
Usual usage for electrical "converter" is DC-DC, like boost step up from 12V to 24V, or buck step down.

This use for "power supply + charger" is I believe RV industry specific.

And yes mains=shore=AC grid power like in s&b homes.

WRT the loose connector, a ferrule terminator is better than stranded, however a butt connector to a solid copper wire might be best of all.

Good crimps and still check the screws regularly.
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