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CO Detectors
#1
I want to get a CO detector for my van, and I have a price limit of about $10. Some do smoke as well as CO. I've seen a few cheap ones on eBay:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/171519946401
and
http://www.ebay.com/itm/261508524970
and
http://www.ebay.com/itm/281532084285
Any one have any input? Any recommendations?
Andrew
Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for dinner. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote. -- Benjamin Franklin (attrib.)
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#2
Funny you should mention this now.

Just last week I had to undergo my annual fire safety training at the state facility I work at. ( I retire in 108 days, but who's counting?Smile )

Anyway thus subject came up, and our fire safety officer called combined smoke and CO detectors ridiculous. Smoke detectors must be mounted up high. But CO is slightly heavier than air. The way he put it was: " If you're asleep when the CO starts coming in, by the time there's enough of it to reach a ceiling mounted detector and set it off, you're already dead."

CO detectors must be mounted low.

Btw, I know that money can be awful tight, but using the word "cheap" in the same sentence with "safety equipment on which your life may depend" doesn't make a lot of sense.

Regards
John
Regards
John

Life is not about discovering yourself.  Life is about creating yourself!

Talk is cheap because of simple economics: The supply FAR exceeds the demand!
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#3
(12-25-2014, 03:35 PM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: Funny you should mention this now.

Just last week I had to undergo my annual fire safety training at the state facility I work at. ( I retire in 108 days, but who's counting?Smile )
LOL
(12-25-2014, 03:35 PM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: ...
Btw, I know that money can be awful tight, but using the word "cheap" in the same sentence with "safety equipment on which your life may depend" doesn't make a lot of sense.

Regards
John
I know, but 'cheap' is not a synonym for 'inoperative'. That reminds me of a commercial I heard in the UK, at the end of it a man's voice says: "reassuringly expensive". I can't remember what they were selling, CO alarms maybe? I have no intention of buying anything because it is "reassuringly expensive"...
Andrew
Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for dinner. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote. -- Benjamin Franklin (attrib.)
[Image: RVNsvc1966.jpg]
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#4
(12-25-2014, 03:35 PM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: Funny you should mention this now.

Just last week I had to undergo my annual fire safety training at the state facility I work at. ( I retire in 108 days, but who's counting?Smile )

Anyway thus subject came up, and our fire safety officer called combined smoke and CO detectors ridiculous. Smoke detectors must be mounted up high. But CO is slightly heavier than air. The way he put it was: " If you're asleep when the CO starts coming in, by the time there's enough of it to reach a ceiling mounted detector and set it off, you're already dead."

CO detectors must be mounted low.

Btw, I know that money can be awful tight, but using the word "cheap" in the same sentence with "safety equipment on which your life may depend" doesn't make a lot of sense.

Regards
John

Thanks for that. That is excellent information.

Question:

CO - carbon monoxide - is usually from car exhaust
CO2 - carbon dioxide - what we breathe out, and part of what propane heaters expel

So the CO detector goes low--ish... maybe 12 inches off the floor?

Where should the CO2 detector go?

I also plan to put in a propane detector and smoke detector.

Safety first!
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#5
(12-25-2014, 03:57 PM)anm Wrote: I know, but 'cheap' is not a synonym for 'inoperative'. That reminds me of a commercial I heard in the UK, at the end of it a man's voice says: "reassuringly expensive". I can't remember what they were selling, CO alarms maybe? I have no intention of buying anything because it is "reassuringly expensive"...

Well, it doesn't need to be gold plated, and it certainly doesn't need to be "By Appointment to Her Majesty the Queen"

I like the word "reliable". I like the phrase "fail-safe". I like "mil-spec", which has been defined as "Throw it in an airplane. Fly it half way around the world. Kick it out of the airplane and let it fall six feet down into the wet mud. It' still going to work."

Too much of the stuff sold cheaply on ebay can only be described as Cheap Chinese Crap.

Regards
John
Regards
John

Life is not about discovering yourself.  Life is about creating yourself!

Talk is cheap because of simple economics: The supply FAR exceeds the demand!
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#6
CO is not heavier than air. Propane is, of course, so propane detectors must be mounted low but CO detectors should be mounted high.
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#7
(12-25-2014, 07:09 PM)mockturtle Wrote: CO is not heavier than air. Propane is, of course, so propane detectors must be mounted low but CO detectors should be mounted high.
Interesting.

Since you are contradicting someone I trust, I decided to try googling the subject to see what other info I could find on it. I found one site devoted to CO detectors that said:


"You must ensure you get your carbon monoxide detector installation height right. While some guides might recommend placing your detectors on the ceiling, we don't agree.

The specific gravity of Carbon Monoxide is 0.9657 (with normal air being 1.0), this means that it will float up towards the ceiling because it is lighter than regular air. However, when a build up of dangerous levels of CO gas is taking place, this is nearly always due to a heat source that is not burning its fuel correctly (motor vehicle exhaust fumes are an exception). This heated air can form a layer near your ceiling which can prevent the Carbon Monoxide from reaching a ceiling detector.

For this reason we suggest that it is best to mount your detectors on the walls at least a couple of feet below the height of the ceiling. If your detector has a digital read-out, then we recommend placing it at about eye level so you can easily read it."


Personally, I've decided to mount mine near my bed, around the same height my head will be at while I'm asleep.

Regards
John
Regards
John

Life is not about discovering yourself.  Life is about creating yourself!

Talk is cheap because of simple economics: The supply FAR exceeds the demand!
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#8
Googling this question nets us answers running the gamut of high, low and in between. But this seems to be a fairly reputable answer:
https://nest.com/support/article/Shouldn...-the-floor

Also read this one:
http://www.jaymarinspect.com/carbon-mono...ector.html

Both use the same industrial reference to suggest a central location as a compromise.
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#9
(12-25-2014, 08:20 PM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: ...
Personally, I've decided to mount mine near my bed, around the same height my head will be at while I'm asleep.

Regards
John
My thoughts exactly...

But why not in the bedroom? Is it just to try and have it closer to the potential source?
Andrew
Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for dinner. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote. -- Benjamin Franklin (attrib.)
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#10
Mine was installed on the wall of my RV about a foot from the ceiling. I only have one room.
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