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Making a living as a traveling poker dealer
#21
Here's another free class, this one in Kansas City KS:
https://careers-pngaming.icims.com/jobs/...b?mode=job

Also, the jobs for WSOP have been posted:
http://caesarscareers.jobs/jobs/?locatio...=2016+wsop

"WSOP dealer" is what I am, and it requires lessons or experience. There is still time to take a class and work this year but you would need to do it soon!

Towards the bottom of the page are payout clerk, cashier, and chip runner openings. There is no school requirement for these, but you should be comfortable handling money and dealing with customers. If you don't have experience dealing with casino chips there are youtube videos out there showing how to properly stack and count them. For practice you can either buy a cheap set of chips to practice with or simply go to your local poker room cashier and buy one stack each of $1 $2 (if they use those at that casino) and $5 chips. Practice stacking and counting them, and return them when you are finished for a refund. I've tried asking around about how many new cashiers/chip runners they need each year and haven't gotten good answers but they do seem to be hiring new people every year. If you think you might be interested it's worth applying now to see what happens.
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The following 3 users say Thank You to Reducto for this post:
Mystic (11-28-2016), Paisley777 (05-28-2016), Cantgetright (01-26-2016)
#22
Any thoughts about dealer schools? I see prices ranging from $500 to $2000+
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#23
(05-28-2016, 02:08 PM)Paisley777 Wrote: Any thoughts about dealer schools?  I see prices ranging from $500 to $2000+

Good ones seem to run $1000-1200. Any reasonably sized city with legal poker rooms should have at least one. I'd recommend talking to a local poker room manager to see what class they recommend. I'd say it's more about how much work you put into asking questions and practicing than it is about how highly rated the school is. The number of little rules covering different situations you see at the table can be overwhelming when you first do it, but the more you think things through and practice the easier it becomes.

I also know a few good WSOP dealers who run classes out of their homes early in the year specifically for people wanting to deal at the WSOP. You miss out on some benefits of an established school but gain some more personalized attention and the class will be tailored specifically to the rules you'll encounter at the series. I think the costs would be lower for that type of thing but I'm not 100% sure. I'll post something about those next fall when they start happening again.

The final option is sometimes casinos will offer free classes for prospective employees. Hopefully you would at least be open to getting a job at that casino but if at the end of the class you decide not to accept a job there, you wouldn't be the first. I set up an alert on indeed.com with the word "poker" and come across one of those opportunities every few months. You could also go to the job sites for specific casinos near where you are and set up alerts there. These classes are typically at out of the way casinos where they have trouble finding workers, they won't be in major hubs like Las Vegas or Miami.

As a side note I just went through orientation for this year's event and start work on Tuesday! If you'll be in Vegas anytime between now and early July stop by to soak up some AC and take a look!
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#24
This flyer was posted in the WSOP break room. If you have access to something resembling a full size poker table to practice on these online classes could be an option for you. Ideally you'd have a few people to practice with. Before investing in the class you can start with the free videos here on shuffling, pitching, and chip handling plus the intro to poker:

http://truepokerdealer.com/

If you make it through those and are still interested, consider going to a land based school or investing in the "fully certified" online program.

Kim Smith is the main person in charge of dealers at the WSOP and taught the class I took.


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The following 2 users say Thank You to Reducto for this post:
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#25
Thanks for keeping all informed.


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#26
A few more classes popped into my inbox. These links will only work while the listings are active - you can always search indeed.com to get current results.

Here's a free one in Kansas City:
https://careers-pngaming.icims.com/jobs/...b?mode=job

Here's one in Durant, OK which is a couple of hours outside Dallas. It doesn't mention any costs so I'm not sure exactly what's involved:
https://career4.successfactors.com/caree...ine=Indeed

This one is in Verona, NY. Cost is $175 which is very cheap for a month-long class!
https://www.hrapply.com/onellc/AppJobVie...ral=indeed

I just finished working the World Series and am still enjoying myself! We were VERY short staffed again this year so the hours were long but the money was good.
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rtb111 (09-20-2016)
#27
And it's air conditioned. But are there smoking customers everywhere? Second hand smoke must be terrible.


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#28
Nearly all poker rooms in the US are non-smoking. Occasionally there will be a short wall separating the poker area from the casino floor so you'll get a little smoke wafting over from 5 feet away but that's rare.

A few allow vaping if that's a concern of yours.
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#29
People need to eat. So many just tolerate vaping or other work hazards. But still appreciate the advice to others for making an income.


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#30
(06-15-2016, 10:19 PM)Reducto Wrote: This flyer was posted in the WSOP break room. If you have access to something resembling a full size poker table to practice on these online classes could be an option for you. Ideally you'd have a few people to practice with. Before investing in the class you can start with the free videos here on shuffling, pitching, and chip handling plus the intro to poker:

http://truepokerdealer.com/

If you make it through those and are still interested, consider going to a land based school or investing in the "fully certified" online program.

Kim Smith is the main person in charge of dealers at the WSOP and taught the class I took.


In poker class now and while doing research for a WSOP class I found this.  I was wondering if it was any good.  Damn good price at least.  I have tons of exp learning solo/online, so I think this could work for me.

PS:
I sent you a PM earlier
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