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Info On Common Vans
#11
A total flush is indeed far more 'serious' than a simple fluid change.  The only time I had a flush done, and it requires a special piece of equipment in the shop, was when I was offroading my '85 4X4 Dodge Ramcharger truck, and 'sunk' it in a deep puddle.  I got lucky and did not suck water into the engine, but the starter was ruined (NEVER try to crank it when submerged in muddy water!!) and the tranny got flooded.
Had the truck towed to a shop, and the old fluid came out looking like strawberry icecream.....   YUCK!!  Even after the flush, it shifted a bit oddly for a week til it had coughed out all the grunge.  But it ran and drove fine the next couple years.  Not a tranny problem, it was strictly MY bad.  I learned.  The Chrysler 727 is a rugged tranny and can take much abuse, but there are limits.
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#12
(01-24-2016, 07:04 PM)BradKW Wrote: Good stuff, thanks! Couple Q's...

1) I was under the impression that transmission "flushing" was the upgraded service over just a drain & replace. I know that a garage told me that once and they charged more, I believe saying it required special piece of equipment. They also cautioned me that it could damage the seals on my older van. If you could comment further on different ways to service a tranny...?

2) I've read that "fleet maintained" isn't what it used to be...in fact, it shouldn't be considered a "sales point" to justify higher price anymore. I read this in a forum (possibly manufacturer specific, not sure) and the OP was a fleet mechanic. Others with claimed fleet maintenance experience supported this. The basic premis was: Fleet maintenance has gone so far corporate that the theme is now "get it in, get it done fast, get it out as cheap as possible."

I don't necessarily have a valid opinion on mechanical issues at all...I can change a tire, swap a battery, and...hmm, surely there must be something else....

1) A true drain takes 6 hours. A flush is better than a quick drain is what they mean. It's because there is so much fluid in the torque converter.

2) I agree it isn't what it once was. That said, I'd rather have the record than not.

Haynes manuals, YouTube, forums ... They are your friends when you want to learn how to do more.
There is no replacement for: Research, Planning, Training, and Practical Experience
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#13
Oh, when you service a transmission be sure to switch to a magnetic drain plug if yours doesn't have a magnet in the bottom. Keeps those metal bits in one place.
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#14
(01-24-2016, 08:25 PM)Gideon33w Wrote: Oh, when you service a transmission be sure to switch to a magnetic drain plug if yours doesn't have a magnet in the bottom. Keeps those metal bits in one place.

Can a guy purchase tranny filters with a magnet in the filter itself? Or if there is no magnet, can a strong one be easily placed somewhere secure on the transmission in case there is no drain plug?

A lot of transmission pans don't have drain plugs. I've only had two automatic transmissions and neither had a drain plug. Nor did any of the others I've serviced, but I've done only a few. Have always thought it odd to be forced to remove the whole pan without draining first and try not to slosh that tranny fluid; very hard to do with a wide, shallow pan.
“If I could be half the person my dog is, I'd be twice the human I am.” ―Charles Yu
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#15
You want the magnet at the lowest point of the pan. 

Indeed, there are several ways to add magnets to a pan but I HIGHLY suggest you add a drain plug if you don't have one. It makes regular servicing far simpler.

There are kits available to do it that only require drilling (some need to be tapped). Just suck it up and add the plug. You'll be glad you have it for future maintanance. 

Fully dropping the pan need only be done to change filter, adjust bands, and repair/replace parts. I prefer to drain/fill annually and drop pan every 30k for filter & band service. But thats probably overkill for most.
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#16
Of course, Ive had a lot of auto cars, thanks to my bad back, that pull bigger numbers than some of these large motors so I like to take good care of the transmissions, ha-ha.
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#17
(01-24-2016, 09:12 PM)Canine Wrote: Can a guy purchase tranny filters with a magnet in the filter itself? Or if there is no magnet, can a strong one be easily placed somewhere secure on the transmission in case there is no drain plug?

A lot of transmission pans don't have drain plugs. I've only had two automatic transmissions and neither had a drain plug. Nor did any of the others I've serviced, but I've done only a few. Have always thought it odd to be forced to remove the whole pan without draining first and try not to slosh that tranny fluid; very hard to do with a wide, shallow pan.

A common practice for offroad Dual Sport motorcycles is to attach a powerful magnet on the bottom of the crankcase, for this very reason.  Later they did come out with magnetic oil plugs.
Same could be done on cars/vans.
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#18
isn't magnets in the auto tranny pan pretty much standard? cant remember not seeing them on the ones i have take the pan off on
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#19
More standard in recent years but plenty of older vans without them. Also, lots of vehicles don't have drain plugs (Cough Chevy cough cough).
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#20
The round magnet inside my Dodge's A-500 was pathetically weak, last time I was in there.

It got replaced with some stronger Neodymium magnets.

A added a Magnefine Inline filter on my flexible lines to my additional transmision cooler, but it weeps fluid from the seam and very seldomly drips, which is not too confidence inspiring.

It too has a round magnet inside, also not very strong.  The one I removed from my power steering, because it was weeping PSF, and opened up revealed the magnet did catch a good amount of ferrous dust.  they do have a bypass valve too if the filter element is clogged or perhaps the fluid too cold and pushed quickly by higher rpms.  But they have to be plumbed in the right direction, not backwards.

Soon I will be removing and opening the slowly weeping Magnefine on my transmission lines and plumbing in a separate remote mount filter that can take the same filter as my 318 Engine.  I will line the exterior of this filter, A fram Ultra XG-16, with Neodymium magnets as I do my regular oil filter.

The Fram Ultra is not to be confused with the Low end Orange can Fram that has the fiberboard endcaps, so do not  get your panties all bunched up in a wad over the four letter F word.  The Fram Ultra is a very well made filter, especially for 8$,  with some of the best filtration numbers available.

I welded a drain plug on my A-500/42re's pan, which makes dropping 4 to 5 quarts simple and pan drops much less messy.  Regular 'flushes or fluid exchanges do not require a pan drop and a filter change.  I would not perform/ have performed one of these flushes, without then dropping the pan and changing the filter within afterwards.

With the Dodges, only ATF+4 transmission fluid is allowed.  Do not trust any transmission shop or any Quickle lube joint to actually use Licensed branded ATF+4. 
 Instead they will use their Universal fluid and some additive, as if this will make the fluid synthetic and much more resistant to heat degradation.  Dodge owners Beware of this common practice of giving you a 5 fingered prostate exam and using the wrong fluid.

Using any other ATF In dodge Van overdrive transmissions from 1988 to 2003, will cause at the minimum, torque converter clutch chatter  within 10K miles, and likely other issues as well if left in longer.

As said, Dodge transmissions need to be babied.  Make use of that OD off button too, around town or climbing hills. Mine will try and engage OD at 28MPH under light load.  I generally keep OD from engaging under 45mph via the liberal use of this button.  Even though I can climb hills in overdrive, when I press the OD off button, I also have to back off the gas pedal as I would accelerate otherwise.

I'd like to have a button just to prevent the lock up function too, or better yet prevent it from disengaging when I take my foot off the gas.
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