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Wood Gasification
#21
yep and I just gave a quick summary there are other obstacles I didn't bring up. highdesertranger
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cyndi (02-13-2016)
#22
Fuel is easy here they call it hog fuel and they will deliver it for free just cost you a phone call wood gasification works personally its a want to do project also but I will be building it on a trailer that way it can be used on my next vehicle or generator you could even just put a large bag on the roof no need to take the gasifire with you at all just have to keep your driving to 30 mile trips lots of opportunities and ways it can be done woodchips/coal/charcoal/bits of wood left overs from factories/recycle pallets.
It just boils down to time and money and will to do it.... I have the will just dont have the other two items....
You can use it for a replacement for where ever you use propane/heating/cooking/lighting...
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#23
It seems to me that a thread like this went to the end of it's life, not that long ago, with the same people offering the same arguments. The OP has another thread started about the value of ones time, perhaps if both were joined, they would compliment each other.
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#24
I want to add another thought. As I mentioned in the other thread, I spent a lot of time on wood for the family as a kid. That kind of work as well as other work I have done over the years has left me all but crippled by the time I was 36. At 53 I am happy to still be walking, well most days anyways. I don't pick much up any more, my legs collapse for days afterwards.

They don't call it back breaking work for nothing.

So if you want to talk something of value, think about what you are trading for the long term damage to your body.
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gcal (02-14-2016), Off Grid 24/7 (02-13-2016), cyndi (02-13-2016), Konaexpress (02-12-2016)
#25
(02-12-2016, 09:26 PM)flying kurbmaster Wrote: It seems to me that  a thread like this went to the end of it's life, not that long ago, with the same people offering the same arguments. The OP has another thread started about the value of ones time, perhaps if both were joined, they would compliment each other.

Yup.  I'm not going to post my thoughts again in this thread.  I believe he received a lot of great advice and I guess none of it swayed him.  

OP I look forward to you keeping to your time frame and leaving home running on wood.  Keep this thread updated.
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears...in...rain.

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gcal (02-14-2016)
#26
(02-12-2016, 09:04 PM)Nomad Wrote: Fuel is easy here they call it hog fuel and they will deliver it for free just cost you a phone call wood gasification works personally its a want to do project also but I will be building it on a trailer that way it can be used on my next vehicle or generator you could even just put a large bag on the roof no need to take the gasifire with you at all just have to keep your driving to 30 mile trips lots of opportunities and ways it can be done woodchips/coal/charcoal/bits of wood left overs from factories/recycle pallets.
It just boils down to time and money and will to do it.... I have the will just dont have the other two items....
You can use it for a replacement for where ever you use propane/heating/cooking/lighting...

Thank you!  The term "hog fuel" finally gave me something I could do a little more research on.

I couldn't seem to find any source of free hog fuel though, most of what I was able to find appeared to cost about $200 a ton.

There appears to be 2 different kinds of hog fuel.  One is processed wood, recycled wood, mill ends, etc. and this type appears to be cheaper.  The 2nd type is unprocessed wood, chunks of fresh cut wood.

In reading further, I discovered some discussion that the processed wood type could burn out wood stoves and stove pipes rather quickly.  After reading that, it raised the question to me of whether or not it would also have an adverse effect on a wood gasifier.

I also noticed that while some websites listed the type of hog fuel, many others made no mention of whether the contents would be processed wood, unprocessed, or a combination of both.  Does anybody know if this is a major concern?
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#27
(02-11-2016, 08:08 AM)gsfish Wrote: I burn orphaned wood for heat and would be surprised to be able to leave home and return in two hours with 1,000 pounds of wood. Your expectation might be over optimistic.

Don't forget to include the added hours of your time necessary on a daily basis to run this system as compared to just turning the key. That is just as  significant as the gathering/processing of the wood stock.

I am curious about the process of using wood for fuel and would like to know more...
1: Are just certain types of wood suitable? Every kind of wood is suitable, some are denser than others.
2: What is involved in "processing" the wood? Will you use a chipper or do it by hand? By hand at first, then with powertools, and eventually with a chipper.
3: What is involved with a "cold start"? Such as driving to work in the morning. How long to get going? The gasifier stays smoldering for upto 18 hours after shutoff, and can be relit if needed. I hear getting warmed up in the morning takes 10-30 minutes. One can always load and light the gasifier, run on gas for 15 minutes then switch to woodgas for the rest of the way. Woodgasification is compatible with errrands, but is best for continous use.
4: How far will the rig travel on one charge of wood? 100 pound hopper burning at a rate of 2 pounds/mile means 50 miles. Load the hopper in South San Jose and go to the club in SF on one "charge".
5: When one charge is depleted what is the process to load a new charge? How long of an interruption before continuing down the road? 5-10 minutes, every 50 miles; these numbers are from Have Wood Will Travel.
6: Is there necessary routine cleaning that must be done. If so, how often? Have Wood Will Travel has a Maintnence Schedule, they advise washing the system out every 1000 miles or so.

Have you come up with an estimate of cost to build this system with trailer and the conversion of your van? Also any estimate of number of hours to complete? $1-2000 to build, and at least 250 hours of labor (my numbers are from Wayne Keiths book Have Wood Will Travel).

I know you have posted at length on this subject before, have you made any physical progress on the project? If you have started construction and can post some pictures it will add some legitimacy to your claims. Haven't moved a foot closer to CANADA in the last 3 weeks, because my circadian clock is 6-8 hours ahead of noon. Getting up at 2-4 PM and going to bed at 4-6 in the morning is not getting me any closer to CANADA. Ordered SoLux ColorView Daylight simulating bulbs to turn on from 11 AM to 12:45 PM (solar noon), to adjust my clock.

I am looking forward to following progress on this build. Get cracking, the clock is ticking, four months till Vegas! Very True!

(02-12-2016, 10:23 AM)Patrick46 Wrote: ...
and you also think it's possible to gather #1000 of wood in 2 hours??? ... I don't know what 1000 pounds of wood looks like, but I do know a cord of wood is, a cord of wood measures 4x4x8' and weighs 2-3000 lbs. People give away truckloads of wood on Craigslist all the time, I guess I can thank Californias Eco-Nazis for that.


(02-12-2016, 11:34 AM)Konaexpress Wrote: If you don't mind a few extra pounds  in your rig, you could build a small rocket stove from steel pipe. Those dang things get supper hot so never use it inside! Great wood stoves though. Sticks and twigs.....

John
Thought about building a rocket stove, but it's not going to get me and the van to CANADA.
(02-12-2016, 12:15 PM)gsfish Wrote: ...
It seems that wood gas reduces power by about 50% thus limiting speed. All the waiting for the thing to warm up, stopping to clean out, reload and wait again while traveling and cleaning would turn a long distance trip into a nightmare
... I know that and accounted for that into the money AND time cost of woodgasification. Even with all those downsides, it's still cheaper than gas (money AND time cost).

(02-12-2016, 04:05 PM)Off Grid 24/7 Wrote: I think the key here is the unknown that I haven't seen an explanation of...  Exactly where and how is this cheap/free wood going to be obtained in sufficient quantity, in so many areas of travel.  And how much is it going to cost in money and/or time to process this elusive wood before it is ready for use. This is why I want and need Wood Capacity, having the means to haul 2000+ pounds of wood is a 1000 miles of range before needing more wood. Wood Capacity equals the ability to stock up and top off in regions with the most wood.

Without those facts available, and verifiable, this seems like a really foolish notion, since we're talking about huge quantities of wood to do any amount of traveling. Of Course!

People turned to this method when gas became unavailable.  As soon as gas became available again, everyone switched back.  It seems to me that if it all that good, or saves all that money, that the majority would have kept using it. They switched to gas because energy was cheap back then. People back then sold a lot less time for the same amount of energy as we do today.
...



(02-12-2016, 10:26 PM)jimindenver Wrote: I want to add another thought. As I mentioned in the other thread, I spent a lot of time on wood for the family as a kid. That kind of work as well as other work I have done over the years has left me all but crippled by the time I was 36. At 53 I am happy to still be walking, well most days anyways. I don't pick much up any more, my legs collapse for days afterwards. Lets hear from you, how many hours did you spend to gather and process 1000 pounds of wood? What tools were you using.

They don't call it back breaking work for nothing. I can use the exercise. whats better than exploring the US and CANADA, seeing new things & breathing new air everyday while becoming a slimmer boi??????????????

So if you want to talk something of value, think about what you are trading for the long term damage to your body. Intially it will be hard work; but as tools, processing equipment, knowhow, tips and tricks are acquired it gets [b]logarithmically easier. [/b]

[quote='Off Grid 24/7' pid='181927' dateline='1455398923']
Thank you!  The term "hog fuel" finally gave me something I could do a little more research on. Hog fuel? that term makes it easier!!!
Working to earn my CDL so I can get ahead & LIVE LIFE!

debitservus.wordpress.com

Time saved is Time Banked* & value added.  *in quality of life context.

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#28
If I may make a constructive observation, there's a pattern every time you post one of these threads. You ask a question, people give advice on the question/premise, you ignore all of the advice and keep repeating yourself. Why ask the question at all?

You've clearly spent a lot of time researching this. I would suggest that, even if the numbers you've found suit you, they are likely best-case numbers and they are definitely coming from people with the resources, fabrication skills and their own wood supplies to make it feasible.

I really implore you to go do anything practical related to this project before putting any more mental energy into it. Go out and collect that 1,000lbs of wood. It doesn't matter if you have no way to haul it or nowhere to put it or whatever other issue. Just go collect that wood and see how convenient it is. It'll be a good use of a day.

I don't think anyone here has told you that you can't do this. But you're not going to have any perspective of the difficulties without some practical experience.
[Image: W2lacLw.jpg]
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#29
(02-13-2016, 03:28 PM)Off Grid 24/7 Wrote: Thank you!  The term "hog fuel" finally gave me something I could do a little more research on.

I couldn't seem to find any source of free hog fuel though, most of what I was able to find appeared to cost about $200 a ton.

There appears to be 2 different kinds of hog fuel.  One is processed wood, recycled wood, mill ends, etc. and this type appears to be cheaper.  The 2nd type is unprocessed wood, chunks of fresh cut wood.

In reading further, I discovered some discussion that the processed wood type could burn out wood stoves and stove pipes rather quickly.  After reading that, it raised the question to me of whether or not it would also have an adverse effect on a wood gasifier.

I also noticed that while some websites listed the type of hog fuel, many others made no mention of whether the contents would be processed wood, unprocessed, or a combination of both.  Does anybody know if this is a major concern?

They cant get rid of free hogfuel fast enough here their are 6 companies that come up on my first enquiry...
Almost all the greenhouses use hogfuel for heat makes for cheaper veggies locally...
And the amount of free firewood is mindblowing also but this you have to pickup yourself...

Free Wood Chips - NORTH DISTRICT 

[Image: 00y0y_jkMveyDlL38_600x450.jpg]

size / dimensions: 8 yards

FREE WOOD CHIPS - DELIVERY ONLY - NORTH Districts

BC Plant Health Care is a company that takes care of tree removals and various pruning.
Because of this, we have loads of wood chips** that we would like to deliver to you.

**(1) Truck load of wood chips = approximately 8 yards of wood chips
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#30
I have never seen a woodgasification vehicle driving down the road. Do they exist? how do they manage to stay on the road, in urban areas, wood smoke is highly polluting, a lot of places ban wood stoves unless they are ultra efficient, I have an image of a van driving down the road with a smoke stack billowing smoke, stopped at an intersection under a bridge, people rolling up their windows to avoid being smoked out, or driving down the highway on a cold morning with a stream of fog building up behind it or does this thing burn very efficiently, with no smoke. Almost everywhere you go now a days have environmental police, last year I was stopped and my antipollution system on my 1986 kurbmaster was checked out and luckily I hadn't yet pulled the smog pump because I was looking at 1,000's of dollars worth of fines, so if you are intending on driving that thing in Canada you better check the laws, I doubt you would get out of California. What about insurance companies how do they look at this contraption, with smoke and fire above a gas tank driving down the road or stopping at gas stations, how do you intend to get around this. I like ingenious ideas but this seems plagued with problems how do they answer these questions on your gasification site. Again I think the system would work for pumps or generators in a rural environment, with a good wood supply but driving down the road seems like a major headache, why not put your energy into making an electric van, that makes a lot more sense to me.
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