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CB Radio Today
#1
Hello folks, in cleaning out the house, I came across a lot of old (1984 era) CB radios and antennas. Back in the day, I remember getting useful information from local truckers on road condition, directions, etc.

Has CB radio changed since? is it worth it to include it when I get on the road?

Carl
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#2
If you have it already , why not put it in the rig? The price is right !
There are a lot less people using them than in the 80s but still some use for one.

Now I'll defer to the ham guys so they can convince you to invest in their world.
Stay Tuned
popeye

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#3
I have one in my van for those occasions where it may be beneficial for short range communications if in a caravan or something.  You already have it, so no new money spent, just a little time to connect it. Smile
Brian

2000 Roadtrek 200 Versatile "The Beast" (it has been tamed hopefully)  I feed it and it doesn't bite me.
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#4
(11-15-2016, 12:16 PM)rvpopeye Wrote: If you have it already , why not put it in the rig? The price is right !
There are a lot less people using them than in the 80s but still some use for one.

Now I'll defer to the ham guys so they can convince you to invest in their world.
Thanks guys, I'll see if the CB gear still works and will mount it in the rig. I do have hamradio gear too, HF, 2m, 220, and a 2m/440 dual bander mobile rigs, (hope they still work too). Been licensed since 1985.

One thing I've found for very local information like what's happening a mile up the road, the ham rigs were pretty useless because the chances of another ham op up ahead is pretty slim. Going through a repeater you get people a great distance from where I am and not knowledgeable about local conditions.

Carl
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#5
I have a CB in my pickup, I'll probably move it over to the van when I build it out. Ham 2m/440 for traffic conditions is ok in some larger cities, but for general long haul interstate traffic, CB still seems more active.

I have a couple handheld CB's I hand out if I'm convoying with a group, inexpensive and anyone can operate them without a license. So CB is good for that, better than the FRS-GMRS stuff for a caravan group.
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#6
(11-15-2016, 03:05 PM)AngryVanMan Wrote: I have a CB in my pickup, I'll probably move it over to the van when I build it out. Ham 2m/440 for traffic conditions is ok in some larger cities, but for general long haul interstate traffic, CB still seems more active.

I have a couple handheld CB's I hand out if I'm convoying with a group, inexpensive and anyone can operate them without a license. So CB is good for that, better than the FRS-GMRS stuff for a caravan group.

Yes the CB was a lot of fun, used to spend many hours on it back in the 80's, there were many locals on am and also the oldtimers clubs on ssb. Actually, I generally liked talking on CB better, knew most of the local truckers and many used to just report traffic regularly from all parts of the bay area.

Then I got into ham DXing. Been on a long hiatus ever since about 1992 but renewed the license every ten years.

Sad to say, so many of the older folks have passed away.

Carl
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#7
I have a CB in my truck, I will install a ham as soon as I pass my test. you can never have to many options. highdesertranger
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#8
(11-15-2016, 04:35 PM)highdesertranger Wrote: I have a CB in my truck, I will install a ham as soon as I pass my test. you can never have to many options. highdesertranger

That's true highdesertranger, I'd never be without a radio on the road. Ham radio is a great way to pass time too. One person will hear your conversation and will join in, then another, until 5 hours have passed and you've missed your turn off. In fact, the reason I took a long hiatus was because it became so time consuming.

From what I understand, the tests do not require morse code any longer. I guess they are still multiple choice. I took my test in 1985. Back then, they had audio tapes you can buy that went through all the questions and answers you can listen to while driving.

Gordon West had those audio tapes back then, I don't know about today.
http://www.gordonwestradioschool.com/mai..._page.html

Carl
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#9
There is no longer a code requirement for any license class. Also, now there are only three license classes: technician, general, and Amateur Extra Class.
Speed Gray, K8SG
Grand Rapids, MI

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#10
(11-15-2016, 06:21 PM)speedhighway46 Wrote: There is no longer a code requirement for any license class. Also, now there are only three license classes: technician, general, and Amateur Extra Class.

Thanks speed gray, I've a lot of catching up to do. Glad I started the way I did though, from novice.
I found yet another big box of cables and jumpers of all sorts and big Astron power supplies, and they still work great. So thankfully all my iambic and bugs are there as CW was my main mode.

73, Carl
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