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Enclosed cargo trailer questions
#11
(07-31-2017, 07:31 PM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: Not all cargo trailers use screws to attach the interior plywood anymore.  There seems to be a trend to use a power nailer to put the stuff up in order to save time and labor expense.  See:

http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=59441

Didn't realize some were nailing them. Mine were all star drive screws. I'd ask how the sheets were installed before ordering. If they nail I'd ask if they can just leave them off. You just never know when or why you might need to get into a wall down the road sometime. Plus nails don't have nearly the shear strength, at least the ones they probably use, so they either have to use a bunch more, making it even harder to remove the panel. Or they will start shearing off down the road. 
The more I think about it, I think I'd avoid any trailer manufacturer that uses nails or staples. To do so they also would have to use very thin metal unless it was aluminum. And it speaks volumes to what they are willing to do to build as cheaply as possible.
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The following 2 users say Thank You to masterplumber for this post:
hants2 (01-14-2018), mothercoder (08-01-2017)
#12
When Bob, our fearless leader, did his trailer, he simply attached the insulation OVER the plywood.  Absolutely the easiest way to do it, I'm sure, but not necessarily to everyone's taste.

   

http://www.cheaprvliving.com/heat-cold/d...heat-cold/
Regards
John

Life is not about discovering yourself.  Life is about creating yourself!

Talk is cheap because of simple economics: The supply FAR exceeds the demand!
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#13
(08-01-2017, 09:31 AM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: When Bob, our fearless leader, did his trailer, he simply attached the insulation OVER the plywood.  Absolutely the easiest way to do it, I'm sure, but not necessarily to everyone's taste.

lol...makes it look a bit like the inside of an old reefer trailer!

But with a little bit of paneling, carpet, or vinyl added, I can see the appeal of getting it done with the least amount of trouble.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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#14
(08-01-2017, 08:40 AM)masterplumber Wrote: Didn't realize some were nailing them. Mine were all star drive screws.

Come to think of it, mine had a bunch of those star drive screws also. But there were no nails used anywhere.

Mine also had the 2 inch luan trim fastened with staples...what a pain that was.

Angry
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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#15
(08-01-2017, 09:31 AM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: When Bob, our fearless leader, did his trailer, he simply attached the insulation OVER the plywood.  Absolutely the easiest way to do it, I'm sure, but not necessarily to everyone's taste.



http://www.cheaprvliving.com/heat-cold/d...heat-cold/
I guess that's one way to do it.  You lose a little space doing it that way but it sure would be faster.  Do you lose any insulating quality by leaving that gap behind the plywood?
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#16
(08-01-2017, 03:23 PM)mothercoder Wrote: Do you lose any insulating quality by leaving that gap behind the plywood?

I would think the airgap would increase the insulating quality.

You MIGHT have condensation issues in the gap, so I would consider drilling small holes in the floor for ventilation and drainage.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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#17
(07-31-2017, 11:10 AM)mothercoder Wrote: windows?

I'm pricing out the purchase of a cargo trailer which I will order in January in time for spring pick up so I can start finishing it.  But even after watching myriad how-to videos, there are some things I still don't "get."  If someone can answer these questions or provide a link that demonstrates what I'm talking about I would be ever so grateful.  There will be a meal and a beer in it for you if you can find me on the road next year.  I'm a pretty awesome chef.  Smile

So here goes with the questions:

One of the things I'm comparing cost-wise is the finishing.  Of the quotes I have received so far, the cost to insulate the ceiling and walls runs from $250-300, which I consider reasonable, depending on what they are using to insulate (I have yet to get that information).

ELECTRICAL:


I have many questions regarding electrical which is a total mystery to me: 

(1) If I have them insulate the trailer, how does this affect adding electrical? 

Since I know zero about electrical, I also thought about having them add electrical for me but I'm not really sure what I need.  A couple of places will allow you to tell them where to place the lights and outlets, one has been mute about that.  One place I'm investigating includes a breaker box (I need one, right) but the others are mute about that. 

(2)  If I want to be add electrical, what do I need to consider; and

(3)  What do I need to have included to be able to connect solar and batteries later?

(4)  Would it be wiser/easier to place the batteries inside the trailer or get a box for the tongue to place them in and then run the wiring into the trailer?

WINDOWS:

I want two windows on the trailer for cross-ventilation.  One place quoted an exorbitant $640 EACH to put in windows.  Other quotes are more along the line of $150-175 each. 

(1) How difficult is it to put in windows for someone with limited mechanical ability and a bum arm (which will hopefully be less bum by spring but who the hell knows)?

(2)  If I'm able to put them in myself or with assistance with my less mechanically inclined but stronger young son, can I put them in if the trailer has already been insulated?  

Video or blog links with how-to's welcome.  Private message welcome.  Don't forget dinner and a beer (or beverage of your choice).  TIA!
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#18
I know I'm jumping in this a little late but.......
You may want to get bids from local electrician and maybe finish carpenter or even a local handyman. You would have total control and inspection of both the work and materials.
I am a 10 year survivor of stage IV head and neck cancer. 
I have stared death in the eye. . . . Death blinked. 
Griz
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#19
(08-01-2017, 08:40 AM)masterplumber Wrote: Didn't realize some were nailing them. Mine were all star drive screws. I'd ask how the sheets were installed before ordering. If they nail I'd ask if they can just leave them off. You just never know when or why you might need to get into a wall down the road sometime. Plus nails don't have nearly the shear strength, at least the ones they probably use, so they either have to use a bunch more, making it even harder to remove the panel. Or they will start shearing off down the road. 
The more I think about it, I think I'd avoid any trailer manufacturer that uses nails or staples. To do so they also would have to use very thin metal unless it was aluminum. And it speaks volumes to what they are willing to do to build as cheaply as possible.

not  having the trailer company install insulation or plywood is the way i would go, but i'm a control freak
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