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Waste free lifestyle, what does it look like?
#1
I've been watching videos of Waste-free living from people on YouTube. I'm curious if any of the vehicle dwellers here have been practicing this lifestyle? I've been trying to eat raw foods as much as possible, which makes food pretty simple for reducing waste. I'm still not sure how I feel about the various hygiene ideas for toothpaste, shampoo, etc. I also guess that they aren't allowed to use a mason jar or something at Bulk barn when weighing their purchases? Im still researching it. Whos trying It out?? And what does it look like for you?
Is anyone else researching it or about to attempt it?
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The following 2 users say Thank You to Free_to_be_me for this post:
AdventurousAdriana (12-16-2017), Gardenias (09-24-2017)
#2
(09-23-2017, 08:42 PM)Free_to_be_me Wrote: I've been watching videos of Waste-free living from people on YouTube. I'm curious if any of the vehicle dwellers here have been practicing this lifestyle? I've been trying to eat raw foods as much as possible, which makes food pretty simple for reducing waste. I'm still not sure how I feel about the various hygiene ideas for toothpaste, shampoo, etc. I also guess that they aren't allowed to use a mason jar or something at Bulk barn when weighing their purchases? Im still researching it. Whos trying It out?? And what does it look like for you?
Is anyone else researching it or about to attempt it?

Hi there!

I'm aspiring towards living a low/no waste lifestyle.  I haven't transitioned to nomadic living quite yet and I'm also curious if there are any low/no waster nomads on this forum.  It seems like it might be extra challenging to do low/no waste on the road.  Currently I'm trying to swap out wasteful habits for low waste habits slowly.  Over the past year I've done the following things-

-Started using reusable shopping/produce bags
-Started making my own toothpaste, facial cleanser, and moisturizers 
-Swapped my plastic toothbrush for a biodegradable bamboo one (with plastic free, biodegradable packaging!)
-Swapped disposable fem hygiene products for a diva cup and thinx undies
-Swapped plastic disposable razors for a stainless steel safety razor 
-(mostly) Cut out convenience and frozen food packaged in plastic and switched to a more raw/whole foods/vegetarian based diet (I make my own frozen/convenience dinners now by meal prepping)
-Minimized my personal shopping habits and only started buying things that I absolutely needed
-Thrift whenever possible for items I need
-Started making homemade dogfood for my canine companion instead of using the prepackaged stuff
-Bring my own waterbottle & coffee cup to cafes
-Started using stainless steel straws
-Swapped a kureg coffemaker for a pour over (chemix) with reusable filter

I'm looking forward to making more changes in the future!  Smile
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Gardenias (12-19-2017)
#3
I try to live as waste free as possible no matter where I am...  home or traveling.

Reusable shopping bags - check, but use the ones NOT made from hemp or those dirty hippies will steal them from you and try to smoke them.

I use Tom's of Maine natural toothpaste fluoride free, it comes in a recyclable paperboard box but I do have to dispose of the tube.  Only use a pea size dollop of paste on my brush so a tube lasts a very long time. Been using Tom's for many decades.  Started back when I was a dirty hippy.

I use plastic toothbrushes but they get additional uses after they become too wore out for toothbrushes.  Cleaning stuff mostly or shanks to protect yourself while in prison from smoking hemp shopping bags.

I still have my grandfather's safety razor he used in the military. Thinking about getting a blade sharpener so a pack of blades last years.  Might can sharpen those shanks too

Use butcher shops for meat and have it wrapped in paper that can be recycled or used for starting the fire.  Fresh vegetables have little waste.  You can slice fresh vegetables up and freeze them for cooking later.  I can eat carrots all day long and I need to buy lots of them or I'll run out quickly.  Smoking carrots really don't do much but on a positive note it's not illegal so you don't need plastic toothbrush shanks

Limit my trips to the store by keeping a list of things I need or running out of and only buying what is on the list.  And make a trip useful by doing other errands combined with it like going to the post office or running over dirty hippies that like to steal your hemp shopping bags or disposing of the bodies of slow dirty hippies.

Love thrift stores and I use them and donate to them.  Sometimes there are dirty hippies in there looking for hemp shopping bags so I wait outside with the engine running.  Note the above bullet item with no bullet.

I have a stainless steel Bubba coffee mug if I need a cup of coffee while out. It is also heavy enough you can use it as a weapon against dirty hippies...  yeah, you guessed it, trying to steal your hemp shopping bags.

I don't use straws.  I used to but I got tired of my nose going numb and getting nose bleeds so I quit. (reference to more advanced dirty hippies)

Pour over coffee is the best with percolated coffee in a stainless steel pot on the cook stove coming in a close second.  I think they make hemp coffee filters but the hassle probably isn't worth it.
If we were meant to stay in one place, we'd have roots instead of feet. My little place on the interweb - Cyberian Radio 

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#4
Those dern hemp shopping bags. No wonder people are switching to plastic...
2001 Ford Econoline 150
If it's low-cost camping, I'm interested
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#5
Motrukdriver - I'm not sure if you are being real or just poking fun at the thread (due to the frequent mention of hemp bags, dirty hippies, and shanks)... Sad
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#6
People at both political extremes can be ultra-thrifty, including those who are opposed to progressive and greenie values.

Just like a farmer who scraped through the depression, can learn a lot from those that don't necessarily come from the same motivations.
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#7
(12-26-2017, 10:13 PM)AdventurousAdriana Wrote: Motrukdriver - I'm not sure if you are being real or just poking fun at the thread (due to the frequent mention of hemp bags, dirty hippies, and shanks)... Sad

It actually started out serious but I thought gee what fun is that.  So I included the dirty hippy part mainly because I actually was one a very long time ago.  The shank part was from a documentary I saw about prison life and inmates making shanks out of toothbrushes.  It matched up pretty good with the hemp part.   I do try to live a waste free lifestyle when ever possible and I hope you got a chuckle out of it.
If we were meant to stay in one place, we'd have roots instead of feet. My little place on the interweb - Cyberian Radio 

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The following 2 users say Thank You to Motrukdriver for this post:
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#8
(09-23-2017, 08:42 PM)Free_to_be_me Wrote: I've been watching videos of Waste-free living from people on YouTube. I'm curious if any of the vehicle dwellers here have been practicing this lifestyle? 

As usual, I do things a bit differently.  

As in any enterprise, you need a method to evaluate your performance.  For example, Weight Watchers uses a point system.  Foods are assigned point values for specific serving sizes.  Each person is assigned a number of points to eat each day.  The stepping onto the scale gives the summary of a week's effort.  

American football has many statistics like passing yards, rushing yards, turnover count and interception count.  After all that, when the clock statistic gets to zero it is the touchdown scoreboard point statistic that determines the winner.  That's rules of the game not personal choice.  

In my personal life I have a points scheme to keep track.  For example, Peter Luger's is a New York City steak restaurant that is known for an excellent steak experience.  Their product and service are best ever.  On the other hand, Applebee's serves a steak that I occasionally enjoy.  My point scheme is easy to use.  I use dollar points.  The Peter Luger steak experience is 100 to 150 dollar points and the Applebee's experience is about 20 to 25 dollar points.  I use that like Weight Watcher's points.  A more dollar points meal will probably add more to my waist line.  I often go to Burger King where, for under 4 dollar points, I get a Whopper Junior, no mayo no pickle, no ketchup, a salad, no dressing, and a drink.  That's less fat, less calories, less sodium, than the Applebee's meal.  I do like the flame broiled taste.  Some comparisons are obvious.

Fresh broccoli is available year round at Walmart.  Frozen broccoli is also available at the same store.  Without evidence to the contrary I presume that the company has a similar mark up and profit margin on both products.  The last time I compared the frozen broccoli was less expensive.  Therefore, per serving, less dollar points for frozen.  I presume fresh involves loss and waste because it is more perishable than frozen.  Since I don't see that waste I might be of the opinion that fresh is better than frozen.  Based on dollar points all of the issues getting the product to me are accounted for.  Diesel fuel used on the farm is accounted for as is the diesel fuel for transportation.  The big rubber band and plastic shrink wrap on the fresh product and the fancy printed heat sealed bag on the frozen product are accounted for.  It doesn't matter whether there are rushing yards or passing yards or interceptions, the final points score gives an overall summary.  All products, not just perishable groceries, have many inputs that all have costs.  If I only count the waste that I personally see then all the other waste gets ignored.  My dollar points method takes advantage of the work many other people have already done to account for all of the costs and waste.  It is like the Weight Watcher's scale.  It gives a summary of the entire effort.

There is an old saying, penny wise pound foolish.  The pound there is the British currency.  I can brush my teeth only once per week.  That lowers my dollar points used for tooth brushes and toothpaste.  The dollar points increase at the dentist is likely going to be more.  I think the total lifetime point score is what really matters.  Some things cannot be known in advance.  If 3D printing technology makes a $3 set of dentures a reality then the calculation gets changed.  The result of the calculation may still be daily tooth brushing.
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#9
It depends on how you define "waste" and what your priorities are. I think it's more than just how we use material resources. It's also about how we use our time, our mental and physical energy, our life.
Someone wanted me to put this here: http://rollingsteeltent.blogspot.com/
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#10
I try not to be wasteful and recycle most everything that I can. However I would be considered more 'mainstream' consumer by some. One place that I am NOT GOING (no pun) is "family cloths". Ya'll have at it!
http://www.frugallivingnw.com/reusable-c...aper-faqs/

Guy
"We're all bozos on the bus, so might as well sit back and enjoy the ride."

Wavy Gravy

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