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Living out of a Semi
#11
Drove for 14 years and I wouldn't recommend it to my worst enemy. Sure you get to drive all over the country but you are always on a time schedule and rarely, if ever, get to experience the things you see thru the bug guts on your windshield. What you DO get to see are loading/unloading docks and a multitude of dirty urine smelling truck stop parking spaces. Noise, noise, noise... engines idling all night or generators running all night. Parking lot fights, lot lizzards (walking virus factories) beating on your doors, and of course waking up in the morning to go get a cup of coffee and dodging all the plastic bags full of excrement tossed on the ground. Yeah buddy, what a life it was!!!!
If we were meant to stay in one place, we'd have roots instead of feet. My little place on the interweb - Cyberian Radio 

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The following 2 users say Thank You to Motrukdriver for this post:
JustACarSoFar (10-28-2017), CautionToTheWind (10-27-2017)
#12
I drove for over 26 years. I feel very fortunate I am able now to go back and see all those places I had to pass up.
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#13
I have my CDL, but have never used it for long haul stuff, just local equipment moving. Everyone I know with their CDL will do the long haul stuff in the beginning, because the handful of big carriers are the only ones that can afford to insure new drivers. Once they get enough experience under their belts, they transfer over to a local hourly position so they can go home every night.

But if it's what you want to do, i say go for it. You're young and i'm sure it will be an experience you'll never forget one way or another. There is nothing like driving the big rigs, too bad all the politics have to come with it these days.
I've learned that making a living is not the same thing as making a life.
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#14
(10-27-2017, 06:26 PM)Every Road Leads Home Wrote: Everyone I know with their CDL will do the long haul stuff in the beginning, because the handful of big carriers are the only ones that can afford to insure new drivers.  Once they get enough experience under their belts, they transfer over to a local hourly position so they can go home every night. 

Most new drivers have to start OTR/48-state since that is where most carriers need to fill the seats with a warm body. Long haul freight generally has the lowest per-mile freight rates and lowest driver mileage pay.

As they gain experience and seniority or longevity, drivers tend to make several lateral moves, gradually building up experience and work history and able to pick and choose better runs, usually regional and/or local.

Keep in mind that the mega-fleet, bottom-tier, common carriers have a very high turnover rate, some as high as 100% per year! And 75-90% yearly turnover is quite common in the industry. Just walk in any truckstop and look at the racks and bins FULL of recruitment magazines....all FREE of course!

There are many reasons for that: Low pay, long hours, weeks or months way from home resulting in family issues, forced dispatch (even in bad weather), disrespect toward drivers at shippers and receivers, HOS violations, government intrusion, DAC, PSP and CSA reporting, in-cab cameras, driver harassment thru qual-comm (OBC) units, traffic and equipment violations, wrecks, etc etc...

Private carriers, and local and regional positions with common carriers, generally have a much lower turnover rate and usually higher pay and better benefits.

But it's a jungle out there....my hat is off to anyone starting out in that career these days!

This country is 100% dependent on truck freight....so someone has to do it....but stick a fork in me...I'm done!
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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Every Road Leads Home (10-28-2017)
#15
(10-27-2017, 07:35 PM)tx2sturgis Wrote: ....but stick a fork in me...I'm done!



Tempting.  So long as you're not done for.[Image: tongue.gif]
Charlotte
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#16
I did it two years but kidney stones became a problem even with air ride. Friends like car hauling with a day cab and motel room over nights best for comfort, pay and days off.
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#17
(10-27-2017, 07:35 PM)tx2sturgis Wrote: This country is 100% dependent on truck freight....so someone has to do it....but stick a fork in me...I'm done!

It's true,  just about every single item we use and every food we eat got to us via a truck.  So the demand will always be there and if these big companies are still turning a profit with a 100% turnover rate, suppose we won't see conditions improve anytime soon.
I've learned that making a living is not the same thing as making a life.
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#18
Profession will be hit by self-driving like a tsunami IMO less than a generation.

Biggest employer in many states too
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#19
I created this thread for those looking for the cheapest RV living on planet Earth, at any cost to their quality of life, health and life.

(10-27-2017, 08:49 AM)Thevelojym Wrote: I did it for about 20 years. I loved the trucks, loved driving all over the country, but you don't even really belong to yourself. You go where you're told, except in certain setups, but even if you're able to pick loads off a board, the realities of the business are still a harsh dictator.

I wouldn't trade my experience, though. I did get to know my way around the country pretty well. Now I'd like to go back, on my own time, and visit all those places I had to pass up.

(10-27-2017, 06:18 PM)Cap1 Wrote: I drove for over 26 years. I feel very fortunate I am able now to go back and see all those places I had to pass up.
For those looking for the cheapest RV living on planet Earth, at any cost to their quality of life, health and life. You'll wipe out your savings if you PAY MONEY to go to the places you are passing up, and if you're nearby on your day off, if you have to spend more than $10 to get there it's not available to you. I thought this forum was about CHEAP RV LIVING and I found no cheaper RV living than to live out of a Semi-Tractor as a company driver.

(10-27-2017, 09:37 AM)Kmmech Wrote: ... Its not a vacation. You dont get to visit Disneyland, The Grand Canyon, or anything else other than a loading dock or a truck stop. And sometimes you might get to visit the scales, and spend a couple days with no pay waiting to get a fix it ticket signed off! You can ask for a day off, but its not your decision. If you have hours, you're running. If you run out of hours, you boondock where ever you happen to be. And 90% of the time, its not a place you would choose to be. Ive seen lots of people think it all wine and roses, getting paid to travel, when in fact, they have no clue.

For those looking for the cheapest RV living on planet Earth, you're not going to Di$neyland or The Grand Canyon because of cost regardless of what RV you're in. What better adventure than to visit scales, loading docks and truck stops. With the money you're saving in the form of a paycheck, you can live large at the truckstops buying anything you want with the tens of thousands of dollars of savings your uber-frugal RV living provides you.

"sometimes you might get to visit the scales, and spend a couple days with no pay waiting to get a fix it ticket signed off" For an uber-frugal truck driving RVer, there is no better perk.


(10-27-2017, 04:33 PM)Motrukdriver Wrote: Drove for 14 years and I wouldn't recommend it to my worst enemy. Sure you get to drive all over the country but you are always on a time schedule and rarely, if ever, get to experience the things you see thru the bug guts on your windshield. What you DO get to see are loading/unloading docks and a multitude of dirty urine smelling truck stop parking spaces. Noise, noise, noise... engines idling all night or generators running all night. Parking lot fights, lot lizzards (walking virus factories) beating on your doors, and of course waking up in the morning to go get a cup of coffee and dodging all the plastic bags full of excrement tossed on the ground. Yeah buddy, what a life it was!!!!

For someone looking for the cheapest RV living on planet Earth, you can tune these sights, smells and sounds out like you have for the sometimes yucky look of leftovers, agri-dust in the Coachella valley, and your sweaty surroundings from the sweltering no-climate-control days of summer.


Many have asked "what is the cheapest RV living" and I answered it by thinking outside the box.

If you want to spend $0.00 on housing (or as close to it as possible), want that housing to move more than 1000 miles a year (and don't care for desirable/famous scenic locales), want that housing to contain A/C, Heat, high amounts of power to consume in-house, a real bed you can stretch out on, space and CCC for dishes, clothes, portable toilet, bulk buys, storage, 53" Costco teddy bears etc.; and want shower & toilet access at least every other night, while not having a gym membership; and on top of all that being about to make money with said housing on someone elses schedule - become a company driver for an OTR trucking company.

If you a nomadic who (wants to) works to LIVE - work a job for more than minimum wage to earn money, using that money to live life by experiencing desires on your own schedule, and fasttracking medium and long-term goals through sizable income and effective frugality - Seriously look at trucking as it's an employees market right now with base payscale being a living wage.
Working to earn my CDL so I can get ahead & LIVE LIFE!

debitservus.wordpress.com

Time saved is Time Banked* & value added.  *in quality of life context.

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#20
Here is a recent USA Today article that looks into truck companies scamming their drivers.
https://www.usatoday.com/pages/interacti...penalties/

Guy
"We're all bozos on the bus, so might as well sit back and enjoy the ride."

Wavy Gravy

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