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Living out of a Semi
#31
(11-15-2017, 02:47 AM)debit.servus Wrote: Does anyone know anybody living out of a semi-tractor as a company driver or O/O??

I did know several, and still know a few doing that. Lots of man and wife teams go full time OTR, some even use the home terminal as a legal home address. Or they used to, things have gotten complicated since the REAL ID act.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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#32
(11-20-2017, 01:12 PM)CautionToTheWind Wrote: ...
The term "living" out of a semi is not particularly a free tone to it. debit.servus, get yourself in the seat to understand it's not a glorified trade to anyone that has spent time rolling down the lane. Everyone I told what I did for a living, "ooohh I would love to do that and see the country." Well *seeing* sure, however not in the context of being free to roam with an idealistic flavor. When I was in my 20's, it was fun...then got old along with me. Being at the mercy at whatever food is provided, that is what most drivers eat. There isn't much time for shopping, sight-seeing, and showering, let alone doing what you want to do working 70 hours in 8 days.

A shortage of drivers for a reason.

There is a recruiter tone to your posts. How can you proport a job without experience? - just curious.

I made this thread for those who are looking for the cheaper mobile living in America, those who would consider living out a bicycle or shopping cart to lower their living expenses.

I know that i'll be on the trucking companys scheule and almost all "seeing" of the country will be through the semi tractor windows on someone elses schedule. The only real time I'll have to experience things is during the 36 hour reset and even then the trucking company might demand I stay with the truck. For food I'm going to have lots of Subway for a while as they're the healthiest fast food option in most truckstops, and i'll stock up on snacks, drinks, groceries at real grocery stores. The trucking company better let me sleep 10 hours a night or else I'll prep to jump ship (trucking is an employees market right now, more driver demand than driver supply means employess have leverage over employers) & i'll report them.

For the record I know trucking isn't a vacation and I know it's hard work & miserable at times. I'm working to earn my CDL as I need a job that pays a living wage so I can get ahead in life & afford to live the modest mobile life I want, with a few modest hobbies.

More satire than truth Wrote:Many have asked "what is the cheapest RV living" and I answered it by thinking outside the box.

If you want to spend $0.00 on housing (or as close to it as possible), want that housing to move more than 1000 miles a year (and don't care for desirable/famous scenic locales), want that housing to contain A/C, Heat, high amounts of power to consume in-house, a real bed you can stretch out on, space and CCC for dishes, clothes, portable toilet, bulk buys, storage, 53" Costco teddy bears etc.; and want shower & toilet access at least every other night, while not having a gym membership; and on top of all that being about to make money with said housing on someone elses schedule - become a company driver for an OTR trucking company.

For those who want to OWN a unconventional RV, and want to be PAID MONEY to live on the road, look at becoming an Owner Operator (O/O). You won't save tens of thousands of dollars a year (unless you drive loads all the time), but becoming an O/O minimizes many of the disadvantages of Living Out of a Semi as a company driver. You'll have the creative uber frugal synergy of living and working in the same rig, getting PAID MONEY as you drive places with smilin faces! You will have the coolest rig at the RTR with your live-in Semi tractor while still being considered an Uber frugal RVer.

You'll save money as you'll live in the Semi on your off months, eliminating the expense of a Not For Hire privately owned RV. A Semi is the best stealth vehicle in America, so you don't have to spend fuel to boondock. You'll be able to equip your semi with a 120" sleeper box, and have a super-space-efficient mini-apartment that rivals the best RV interiors in function & form; or build out the box yourself (Consult with semi-truck sleeper box experts as it's a commercial vehicle) And you'll save even more if you DIY as much of the truck maintence/repairs as possible.

If you a nomadic like me who (wants to) works to LIVE - work a job for more than minimum wage to earn a life, using that money to live life by experiencing desires on your own schedule, and fasttracking medium and long-term goals through sizable income and effective frugality - Seriously look at trucking as it's an employees market right now with base payscale being more than minimum wage. A perk of OTR is you will get to scout out the country for desirable locales, and maybe spend your 36 hour driver reset daytripping a new part of the country. Another big perk as a mobile dweller provided you don't have apartment rent or mortgage payments is you can work and save towards goals or to take months off, banking nearly all of your paycheck living out of the company truck. More times than not you can store the van/RV in the trucking company's surveilled yard, a perk on top of a perk as your work OTR.


*Billy Mays Voice* Wrote:TIRED of PAYING MONEY to live on the road out of a van or RV?

Introducing trucking, an overlooked way of getting PAID MONEY to live on the road...
Working to earn my CDL so I can get ahead & LIVE LIFE!

debitservus.wordpress.com

Don't waste lifes precious time adorning your coffin, with diamonds. 
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#33
(11-20-2017, 01:12 PM)CautionToTheWind Wrote: ...
The term "living" out of a semi is not particularly a free tone to it. debit.servus, get yourself in the seat to understand it's not a glorified trade to anyone that has spent time rolling down the lane. Everyone I told what I did for a living, "ooohh I would love to do that and see the country." Well *seeing* sure, however not in the context of being free to roam with an idealistic flavor. When I was in my 20's, it was fun...then got old along with me. Being at the mercy at whatever food is provided, that is what most drivers eat. There isn't much time for shopping, sight-seeing, and showering, let alone doing what you want to do working 70 hours in 8 days.

A shortage of drivers for a reason.

There is a recruiter tone to your posts. How can you proport a job without experience? - just curious.

I made this thread for those who are looking for the cheaper mobile living in America, those who would consider living out a bicycle or shopping cart to lower their living expenses.

I know that i'll be on the trucking companys scheule and almost all "seeing" of the country will be through the semi tractor windows on someone elses schedule. The only real time I'll have to experience things is during the 36 hour reset and even then the trucking company might demand I stay with the truck. For food I'm going to have lots of Subway for a while as they're the healthiest fast food option in most truckstops, and i'll stock up on snacks, drinks, groceries at real grocery stores. The trucking company better let me sleep 10 hours a night or else I'll prep to jump ship (trucking is an employees market right now, more driver demand than driver supply means employess have leverage over employers) & i'll report them.

For the record I know trucking isn't a vacation and I know it's hard work & miserable at times. I'm working to earn my CDL as I need a job that pays a living wage so I can get ahead in life & afford to live the modest mobile life I want, with a few modest hobbies.


Many have asked "what is the cheapest RV living" and I answered it by thinking outside the box.

If you want to spend $0.00 on housing (or as close to it as possible), want that housing to move more than 1000 miles a year (and don't care for desirable/famous scenic locales), want that housing to contain A/C, Heat, high amounts of power to consume in-house, a real bed you can stretch out on, space and CCC for dishes, clothes, portable toilet, bulk buys, storage, 53" Costco teddy bears etc.; and want shower & toilet access at least every other night, while not having a gym membership; and on top of all that being about to make money with said housing on someone elses schedule - become a company driver for an OTR trucking company.


For those who want to OWN a unconventional RV, and want to be PAID MONEY to live on the road, look at becoming an Owner Operator (O/O). You won't save tens of thousands of dollars a year (unless you drive loads all the time), but becoming an O/O minimizes many of the disadvantages of Living Out of a Semi as a company driver. You'll have the creative uber frugal synergy of living and working in the same rig, getting PAID MONEY as you drive places with smilin faces! You will have the coolest rig at the RTR with your live-in Semi tractor while still being considered an Uber frugal RVer.

You'll save money as you'll live in the Semi on your off months, eliminating the expense of a Not For Hire privately owned RV. A Semi is the best stealth vehicle in America, so you don't have to spend fuel to boondock. You'll be able to equip your semi with a 120" sleeper box, and have a super-space-efficient mini-apartment that rivals the best RV interiors in function & form; or build out the box yourself (Consult with semi-truck sleeper box experts as it's a commercial vehicle) And you'll save even more if you DIY as much of the truck maintence/repairs as possible.

If you a nomadic like me who (wants to) works to LIVE - work a job for more than minimum wage to earn a life, using that money to live life by experiencing desires on your own schedule, and fasttracking medium and long-term goals through sizable income and effective frugality - Seriously look at trucking as it's an employees market right now with base payscale being more than minimum wage. A perk of OTR is you will get to scout out the country for desirable locales, and maybe spend your 36 hour driver reset daytripping a new part of the country. Another big perk as a mobile dweller provided you don't have apartment rent or mortgage payments is you can work and save towards goals or to take months off, banking nearly all of your paycheck living out of the company truck. More times than not you can store the van/RV in the trucking company's surveilled yard, a perk on top of a perk as your work OTR.


*Billy Mays Voice* Wrote:TIRED of PAYING MONEY to live on the road out of a van or RV?

Introducing trucking, an overlooked way of getting PAID MONEY to live on the road out of a semi tractor...
Working to earn my CDL so I can get ahead & LIVE LIFE!

debitservus.wordpress.com

Don't waste lifes precious time adorning your coffin, with diamonds. 
Add Thank You Reply
#34
I drove OTR for 7 years with Schneider National in the 90’s. It was great for me then because I was single and in my twenty’s. I saved lots of money then went local hourly for another 5 years with another company out of Baltimore. I’m sure things have changed quite a bit since I was out there and I make way more money as an electrician now working 40 hrs then I could working 70 as a truck driver. That being said if I was ever in danger of becoming homeless I’d sign up right back up. I’d rather sleep in a truck then in the streets for sure. I never understood the economics of owner operators. They were always bragging about how much they grossed but when I asked them how much they netted I always got a blank stare back. My grandfather was a trucker and he warned me not to buy a truck. He said every time he thought he was going to make some money he would need tires or something. The secret to being a trucker I found is to realize that your time has no value to anyone but you and just except the fact that your going to be waiting around all the time. I did a lot of reading in those days. I saw a lot of guys losing it in shipping and receiving offices because of delays and cancellations. If you let it get to you that job will eat you alive.





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Patrick46 (12-15-2017)
#35
Sounds wonderful in theory. I've tried 3 different times to attempt OTR truck driving. Within a two week period, I quit. After this last time, I realized I'm just not cut out for truck-trailer driving especially, OTR. I was anxious the whole time, exhausted, and felt enslaved. Sharing a cramped space with a total stranger aka the trainer was a nightmare. I can't back a trailer worth a damn. I'm still gonna keep my CDL license so that I can drive class B vehicles if the opportunity arises.

I've been living out of my van for a month now and it's a totally different experience.
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#36
I always (except for a few short times) owned my truck. When you are paying for a truck you end up making about the same as an experienced company driver. Once the truck is paid off you make more but that "more" needs to be set aside for an engine rebuild since by the time you get a truck paid off you'll be approaching 600k miles. After you do the once over with replacement parts and engine (maybe transmission) rebuild then you can actually make good money. With me it wasn't about making money. It was about the freedom to pick and choose where I wanted to go. I went north in the summer and south in the winter and I fueled where ever I wanted and if I wanted to stay in a place an extra day or so I did with no issues. Company drivers are under forced dispatch and most of the time you are told where to fuel. Drove for 14 years and lived full time in my truck for 5 years. Had all the comforts of home. When I came "home" I just parked the big truck in my paid for reserved parking spot where the little pickup sat waiting and did what ever personal business I needed to get done. In the evening I just headed back to the truck. I hung out there for a few days till I was bored and then called dispatch to get rolling again. My big number was about $140k a year but my accountant got that down as close to zero as possible. Tax liability and all. A good printer and the ability to photoshop is your friend.
If we were meant to stay in one place, we'd have roots instead of feet. My little place on the interweb - Cyberian Radio 

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gsfish (12-15-2017)
#37
(12-15-2017, 02:30 PM)Motrukdriver Wrote:  My big number was about $140k a year but my accountant got that down as close to zero as possible.  Tax liability and all.  A good printer and the ability to photoshop is your friend.

For others reading this, that $140k is revenue to the truck.

After all expenses the net pay to an owner operator will be a LOT less.

Yes, an O/O with a paid-for, older truck can do fairly well, if everything goes right most of the time. 

But if you get injured or sick or a have major accident or breakdown, the revenue stops. If the truck is still financed, the payment and insurance must continue to be paid, and they ain't cheap!
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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#38
Couple of decades ago, I was hired by GT to drive OTR. On my way to Medford, to go out with my trainer, I stopped at a truck stop near Rice HIll for coffee.
Talked to a couple of OTR (old timers), in less than 1/2 hour they had talked me out of OTR driving. They said go ahead if you want to earn minimum wage after all is said and done, with the time spend off duty-not driving and basically being their slave. Not to mention what the mice are doing while the cat is away! Smile
Long story short, I drove locally. And had a better time by my perspective.
Do what you got to do! What else is there?
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#39
(12-15-2017, 03:00 PM)tx2sturgis Wrote: For others reading this, that $140k is revenue to the truck.

After all expenses the net pay to an owner operator will be a LOT less.

Yes, an O/O with a paid-for, older truck can do fairly well, if everything goes right most of the time. 

But if you get injured or sick or a have major accident or breakdown, the revenue stops. If the truck is still financed, the payment and insurance must continue to be paid, and they ain't cheap!

Very true about revenue to the truck.  I usually spent in the neighborhood of $60k a year just in fuel alone.  It helps A LOT if you can do the basic work on your truck yourself.  That Freightliner dealer in Gary Indiana was charging $125 an hour labor minimum 1 hour and the rest of them were pretty close.   Most of the places I was leased on with had medical insurance coverage available for O/O but it wasn't cheap.  Cheaper than if you went to get it on your own but still a tad pricey.  I paid cash for my first truck and sold it at 2.25 million miles on it.  Still running good too but I couldn't get away from it.  Every time I went "home" I was wrenching on it somewhere.  The last outfit I ran with I was doing a lease purchase but it was an amazing program.  The payment was based solely on mileage so if you took a week off you didn't make a payment or insurance or anything.  Bumper to bumper maintenance was included in the program so I never paid a dime for any repairs. When I retired they gave me a wad of money back on it too and it wasn't fully paid for.  If for some reason I ever had to go back driving again I'd be calling them up right away.  I think they liked me because I was always bring in donuts when I was at the terminal...  hahaha
If we were meant to stay in one place, we'd have roots instead of feet. My little place on the interweb - Cyberian Radio 

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#40
(12-15-2017, 06:44 PM)Motrukdriver Wrote:  I paid cash for my first truck and sold it at 2.25 million miles on it.  Still running good too but I couldn't get away from it.  Every time I went "home" I was wrenching on it somewhere.  

Wow...that's 10 years team operation or close to 20 years running solo...helluva service life for any OTR tractor. I'm assuming that it was probably re-powered once.

Or maybe 2 or 3, in-frames.

Most of our units were leased for 5 years and roughly 600,000 miles, then a full de-service was done, and then sold in the secondary market, with a LOT of life left.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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John61CT (12-15-2017)


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