Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
suaoki solar generator
#11
The shore charging on such units is usually pretty anemic, with a bigger-amp charger and direct access to the posts it could easily be recharged from empty in 30-40 minutes.

On 100w of solar in ideal conditions you should be able to refill it to 100% each day, even with concurrent loads. In fact it's an ideal size for putting out in the field with a suitcase panel away from the van, allowing you to park in the shade without running long cables in between.

No idea of course on the efficacy of the built-in solar controller, that would be worth testing against known-good units.

If the storage capacity of this powerpak is actually 20AH (20-hour discharge rate @ the 12V outlet)

then $160 is a decent price, assuming it suits one's needs otherwise.

Or is there a (more reliable) watt-hour spec somewhere? Any link to a replacement battery?

Sorry if all this seems overly skeptical, but just them calling such a product a "generator" when panels aren't included screams scammer to me.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to John61CT for this post:
andi (10-27-2017), frater secessus (10-27-2017)
#12
The odd thing about that battery pack is it is labeled as 20,000 mAh and 200 watt hours. The watt hours seems way high.

The Anker powerhouse is labeled 120,000 mAh and 400 watt hours, which seems accurate-ish.
Add Thank You Reply
#13
(10-27-2017, 09:14 AM)RossCoe Wrote: OK.  Here are pics of the roof rails of my 2014 Honda Pilot.

How tall is the roofline compared to you?  When you are standing outside does the roof come to your shoulders?  head?  If it's low enough this might be a great opportunity to build in a tilt mount;  the Pilot would face E/W (depending) so that the panel tilted toward the south when propped up.

Or maybe flat-mount flush (or nearly so) with the rack rails so they don't throw shadows on the panel.

It's really not a bad situation for using the bendy panels, particularly if you can unbolt the rails to minimize shadows.
frater/jason @ Quartzsite
blog | Promaster van | offtopic answers
"I would unite with anybody to do right; and with nobody to do wrong" F. Douglass
Add Thank You Reply
#14
With flexible panels, they come with grommets at all four corners, so you can tie them to the roof racks when dry-camping, using paracord or something similar.

Of course this is not workable during travel but I suspect that the pack will be charged when you leave home, and again when you leave camp, or the pack can be charged from the vehicle during travel.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
Add Thank You Reply
#15
> it is labeled as 20,000 mAh and 200 watt hours. 200 watt-hours implies 16.7AH (16,666 mAH) @12V, much less at the actual working voltage (assuming it's LFP) of 13+V

And besides voltage, remember the industry standard for deep cycling batts is "at the 20-hour discharge rate". Peukert's Law means drawing at very low amps leads to grossly inflated capacity numbers.


> Anker powerhouse is labeled 120,000 mAh and 400 watt hours

That is obviously not at 12V, rather 3.3V. Quoting at such a silly voltage makes no sense, except to the scammers in the marketing department.

This is why it's mandatory IMO to get links to the replacement battery, or don't buy it.

Otherwise you have to do an actual 20-hour load test, a pretty major PITA for most.

I'm not saying the ridiculous use of "generator", or fraudulent capacity claims, implies anything about component reliability or build quality, but fundamentally this product space is

a battery in a box

and consumers really should be able to find out the energy storage capacity and specific chemistry type of that battery without having to play Sherlock Holmes.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to John61CT for this post:
RossCoe (10-27-2017), andi (10-27-2017)
#16
> could go with the thin flexible panels

These last for a much shorter lifespan than rigid framed ones, figure three years average if mounted perfectly so no flexing and decent heat dissipation.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 3 users say Thank You to John61CT for this post:
RossCoe (10-27-2017), This world isn't home (10-27-2017), andi (10-27-2017)
#17
(10-27-2017, 11:43 AM)John61CT Wrote: > it is labeled as 20,000 mAh and 200 watt hours. 200 watt-hours implies 16.7AH (16,666 mAH) @12V, much less at the actual working voltage (assuming it's LFP) of 13+V  

And besides voltage, remember the industry  standard for deep cycling batts is "at the 20-hour discharge rate". Peukert's Law means drawing at very low amps leads to grossly inflated capacity numbers.

 but fundamentally this product space is a battery in a box.

I agree it is a battery in a box, but it has a pure sine wave inverter built in along with a charge controller.  I thought it would do OK and be a better way to go with portability and less investment up front.  It's coming tomorrow, so a done deal for me.  I will be happy to test it for you guys that know all about this stuff.  For me, Bob Well's into to solar using quarters was my education to  solar!!  lol.
Just looking for a reasonably priced method of solar charging.  I could go as low as a 20 watt panel or as high as a 100 watt.  Trying to be cost efficient and dollar wise Wink
Add Thank You Reply
#18
RC, I think for your intended use and your stated goals, the unit you are buying will do the job very nicely.

It is after-all, designed for that job.

The battery in that unit will most likely outlast any of us if used sparingly and assuming its charged and discharged in a normal, rational way, and the unit has over-charge and low-voltage protection, which I'm sure it does.

When you get it, do some testing locally, charging it from the car, and using it to charge a phone and a laptop several times. Make sure it works for you...and let us know...

You might even consider a two-part review on this forum under the product reviews. I'm sure others might like to know how it works out at home and in the middle of nowhere!
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
Add Thank You Reply
#19
(10-27-2017, 11:45 AM)John61CT Wrote: > could go with the thin flexible panels

These last for a much shorter lifespan than rigid framed ones, figure three years average if mounted perfectly so no flexing and decent heat dissipation.

I agree that while they sound good for the OP's recharging needs, the longevity of flexible panels is not really their selling point... They seem to have a following in the cruiser/boating forums due to weight concerns however reading pages of reviews off Amazon causes me to be suspect of the price difference and longevity over fixed frame panels. There's also the efficiency rating over time, a glass panel seems quite superior from what I've read (guaranteed performance over the years).

I was debating getting either type for my soon to purchase minivan and even though I'd prefer the looks/weight of the flexible type, I am going to go with a 50 watt glass as that has a smaller footprint (than 100 watt) and has a better life, even though a 100 watt glass is cheaper by the watt (due to volume of sales).

The (OP) "everything in a box" Suaoki lithium battery system was a good price for what she got and her expected uses. Primarily it's the compactness, light weight vs. flooded lead acid (FLA) units and the multiple ways to use it and recharge it that give her an advantage over any other type of quasi-UPS source. (For example, his is so small (9.8 x 6.3 x 3.4 inches) that she could take it into a coffeeshop, plug it in and get it a/c recharged quite easily). For some dwellers the "all in one" is certainly worth paying for, especially if you are not a "tinkerer" or have a bit more of a budget and a bit less of a need for amperage.  Just don't try to run a 12v compressor fridg of that unit, it's way too small.

The big brother Suaoki 400 watt Lithium based units with the same built in "pure sine" inverter usually cost over $1 a watt (currently $429) and  does not have a way to replace theLI battery so that makes it an expensive power source. There are some questions as to the quality and size of the PSW inverter and also the power of the built-in a/c recharger. 

There's concerns over the lithium battery management system (BMS) and how well it will balance and protect the cells for overcharging. All these issues are reasons I haven't been willing to purchase one. It's just too soon for me and I'm not an "early adopter" type of guy. Too bad as 400 watts could likely power a CF18 sized 12v fridg, especiallly with regular solar recharging...

Hope that she tells us how it works for her and the minimal dc needs. It sounds like it pretty much exactly what she needed/wanted.

TWIH
Add Thank You Reply
The following 1 user says Thank You to This world isn't home for this post:
RossCoe (10-27-2017)
#20
> Suaoki 400 watt Lithium based units with the same built in "pure sine" inverter usually cost over $1 a watt (currently $429)

The inverter is just one subcomponent, so its wattage is not to me the basis for apple-to-apple comparisons.

I completely agree that the portability and "no need to figure out the details" all-in-one aspects are fantastic, if at least most of a given unit's components *do* actually meet one's needs.

But in the end, one must figure out those details anyway, in order to actually be sure of it meeting your needs before pulling the trigger. Otherwise a trial and error approach ends up costing more than the van, and you end up with an inefficient hodgepodge of different batts that don't work together.


Most important first question is, what is the storage capacity in standard apples-to-apples AH or wH? Can you answer that for the bigger model you mention?

Then, what specific lithium-ion chemistry is the battery, and will a replacement battery when that wears out, be readily available at a reasonable cost?

How long does it take to fully recharge on shore power? *

Then the inverter specs, what outlet ports are available, etc.

And all that's before overall build quality comes into the discussion, these days even very expensive gear seems designed to be used for a short time then thrown away for the next new shiny toy.

So I'm not saying "DIY is better" in every case, but that is my default stance until I see evidence to the contrary.

_____
* With the built-in charger that's usually a lot longer than anyone would hang out in a coffee shop. Which is ironic since these LIs can usually be safely recharged in 20-40 minutes, if you can get a better charger hooked up direct to the batt inside.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 1 user says Thank You to John61CT for this post:
This world isn't home (11-24-2017)


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2018 MyBB Group.