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Women Only: Power Tools [split from W-RTR]
#11
As Norm Abram would say, " There is no tool more important than eye protection". For anyone just starting out with power tools get some safety glasses. They are cheap and eyes are important.
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The following 2 users say Thank You to sreesekelley for this post:
scooterdog (01-04-2018), yo rockie (11-14-2017)
#12
(11-14-2017, 06:00 AM)yo rockie Wrote: Well, thanks Almost There, you seem to have a good grasp on the subject!  Maybe you can help me with this question: I had some Makita power tools before and was going to go that route again.  They were 18V.  I'm wondering if I should go with the less powerful 12V this time?  Would it be a better match for charging with solar?  I've been intending to go to Home Depot or Lowes but I'm pretty sure they won't have a clue what I'm talking about.

Haha, don't know a thing about the difference between 12V and 18V power tools except that the voltage is different. I don't think it makes a difference in charging, it probably  makes a difference in how much oomph the tool has though. Note I said probably...haven't a clue.

I've not owned cordless power tools for years. I gave up on them because the batteries always wore out for the day before I did.... Rolleyes I went back to the old-fashioned drag the power cord around with me style tools.

This is one problem that having stuff in the women only section creates. Go ask in the regular section and 20 knowledgeable guys will give you an answer...  Big Grin  Either that or PM one of the guys like HighDesertRanger (Mike)
Worry is a misuse of imagination!
 
Build link: http://www.cheaprvliving.com/forums/Thre...g-Arabella
Full-timer again as of November 24, 2015 - 14 glorious years on the road before that!



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#13
I don't know about the solar inverter stuff yet but. I DO know how to run several power tools!

Ryobi is OK, but I prefer Dewalt' 12 v. as someone mentioned. A good battery charged drill like that should come with several
attachments needed. Be sure it does. Like, the reversible flat and phillips screw heads, extension head for tight places
you can't get into otherwise.

then there's the getting used to changing the heads out. If you haven't done it before have someone
show you how! Generally they come with the charger and two batteries.

Skill saws are great for slicing through wood that's over 3/4 in. thick. at straight angels But, jig saw lets you move it around at any angel.
(curving rounded areas)

I wish I wouldn't have sold my tools man! lesson from me, NEVER sell off your tools!!
title~ "Deliberate Discharge", 2 'Stinkin' Badges',  1 'Flying Manure Spreader'  1 'Pink Elephant' Big Grin
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The following 1 user says Thank You to JustACarSoFar for this post:
yo rockie (11-14-2017)
#14
(11-14-2017, 07:42 AM)ValerieP Wrote: I bought the Ryobi that Bob recommended in one of his videos. They are cordless, but I could use another battery. I was terribly frightened of them- especially the skill saw because my dad had a bad accident once. But, I overcame the fear and have used the electric drill, skill saw, and jigsaw.

I wish I'd seen that video.  But, after a LOT of research I purchased a Dewalt 20V driver that came with two batteries, a charger and carrying case.  Tomorrow I'm going back for the jigsaw that's compatible.  Then the fun begins!  Wish me luck!
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ValerieP (11-14-2017)
#15
(11-14-2017, 02:40 PM)JustACarSoFar Wrote: I don't know about the solar inverter stuff yet but.  I DO know how to run several power tools!

Ryobi is OK, but I prefer Dewalt' 12 v. as someone mentioned. A good battery charged drill like that should come with several
attachments needed. Be sure it does. Like, the reversible flat and phillips screw heads, extension head for tight places
you can't get into otherwise.  

then there's the getting used to changing the heads out. If you haven't done it before have someone
show you how! Generally they come with the charger and two batteries.  

Skill saws are great for slicing through wood that's over 3/4 in. thick. at straight angels But, jig saw lets you move it around at any angel.
(curving rounded areas)

I wish I wouldn't have sold my tools man!  lesson from me, NEVER sell off your tools!!

Got my Dewalt driver today!  I'm so glad to hear you say that the jigsaw will suffice and that I don't need the circular saw.  I'm picking that up tomorrow.  Sure wish I had a helper, but I'm just going to go ahead a tackle this myself.  Might look funny, but hopefully it will be ok.
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JustACarSoFar (11-14-2017)
#16
Rockie - I lacked the circular saw as well and did just fine. I didn't have one and really don't like using one so I just did work arounds... Smile

Remember that the lumber yards will cut wood to any size you need. I always took in my list of exactly what I needed cut out of what. I did layouts in advance and placed things for maximum coverage..sewing skills in doing fabric layouts helped there... Big Grin 

They used to charge a buck after the first cut but the last few times I've used H/D for multiple cuts they've not charged me at all...guess it depends on who you get and how busy they are...maybe whether they're in a good mood too... Rolleyes

Take a look at my build thread and you'll see that I mostly managed to hide any bad squiggly cuts by planning ahead.... Big Grin Big Grin

Using the jigsaw takes a little bit of practice. Most of the trick is in using the right blade for what you're cutting. I picked up a package that had all different blades in it and they were labelled as to what they were for.

I also swear by the use of the Kreg Jr. kit for screwing things together. It's my favorite tool!
Worry is a misuse of imagination!
 
Build link: http://www.cheaprvliving.com/forums/Thre...g-Arabella
Full-timer again as of November 24, 2015 - 14 glorious years on the road before that!



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The following 2 users say Thank You to Almost There for this post:
JustACarSoFar (11-14-2017), yo rockie (11-14-2017)
#17
(11-14-2017, 08:54 AM)sreesekelley Wrote: As Norm Abram would say,  " There is no tool more important than eye protection".  For anyone just starting out with power tools get some safety glasses.  They are cheap and eyes are important.

I had to Google Norm Abram but recognized him right away when I saw his picture.  And yes, I also watched some videos on YouTube and one in particular stressed eye protection.  So tomorrow, when I pick up my new jigsaw, I'm going to purchase that too.  Thanks for the tip, Sreesekelley.
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#18
(11-14-2017, 05:50 PM)Almost There Wrote: Rockie - I lacked the circular saw as well and did just fine. I didn't have one and really don't like using one so I just did work arounds... Smile

Remember that the lumber yards will cut wood to any size you need. I always took in my list of exactly what I needed cut out of what. I did layouts in advance and placed things for maximum coverage..sewing skills in doing fabric layouts helped there... Big Grin 

They used to charge a buck after the first cut but the last few times I've used H/D for multiple cuts they've not charged me at all...guess it depends on who you get and how busy they are...maybe whether they're in a good mood too... Rolleyes

Take a look at my build thread and you'll see that I mostly managed to hide any bad squiggly cuts by planning ahead.... Big Grin Big Grin

Using the jigsaw takes a little bit of practice. Most of the trick is in using the right blade for what you're cutting. I picked up a package that had all different blades in it and they were labelled as to what they were for.

I also swear by the use of the Kreg Jr. kit for screwing things together. It's my favorite tool!

Wow, what a lot of work you did!  So, I can see you know what you're talking about.  I'm starting out with a very small vehicle so there won't be anything nearly so elaborate that I need to do.  My brother's advice seemed good and so I'm waiting until I try this out a bit to make sure it's all I think it's going to be.  Then, spring for the van.  So, I have a Honda Element and I'm going to work with what I have.  I'm investing in pretty good tools so that I can use them again when (not if) I know I want to live the full-time lifestyle.  I'll use them to build something more comfortable and practical in a van.  I'd not heard of the Kreg but Googled it and will read up on it.  I appreciate the tips and encouragement.  Thanks!
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#19
(11-14-2017, 08:54 AM)sreesekelley Wrote: As Norm Abram would say,  " There is no tool more important than eye protection".  For anyone just starting out with power tools get some safety glasses.  They are cheap and eyes are important.

And hearing protection too.
..................................................
1997 Class B Dodge van 3500.
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yo rockie (11-14-2017)
#20
A bit o nonsense - I haven't done much research on tools as yet. Someone else mentioned Bob's recommendation of RYOBI tools. I like the idea of RYOBI as they also offer other products you can use their battery packs with such as LED Lanterns and pretty sizeable personal fans. You can see a fellow van dweller using I think 2 fans in a YT Interview/Tour with Bob, she has a used Roadtrek...
Tongue Those ARE chocolate drops, go ahead, taste them Tongue
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The following 1 user says Thank You to ClassyGlobal for this post:
yo rockie (11-28-2017)


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