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Back to the shop...again
#21
Kat

I think you are going to have to hitch that kitten up and have it pull you down to the Q.
Sparky created, (Sparkles on some Saturday nights)  Max the Wonder puppy approved

2011 Ameri-lite 25 ft bunkhouse with 750w of solar and a 675 Ah bank
2003 Ford Expedition with 435w of tilting solar.
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#22
Sleazy mechanics exploit full time RVers because they figure you'll be long gone by the time their crappy work fails.
Someone wanted me to put this here: http://rollingsteeltent.blogspot.com/
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#23
Smidge might be willing..if I could just explain it to her..in her terms
"I never saw a sight that didn't look better looking back"

Kat, Smidge the cat, and Honey

1988 Honeywell.  E350 chassis   21'
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#24
Even with good honest mechanics, low quality parts and suppliers competing for business can destroy their reputation.
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#25
Just my 2 cents trying to help.
Consider non-ethanol gasoline. Gasoline with ethanol will separate after sitting for some time, eating plastic and rubber components.

http://www.fuel-testers.com/ethanol_fuel...tages.html

I know, I know, non ethanol is hard to find.
Most Marinas carry non ethanol. Here is a website that may be useful.
https://www.pure-gas.org/
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#26
(11-16-2017, 06:29 AM)RoamingKat Wrote: ..that (transmission) line for propane was installed by a mechanic in Sanford, NC. Last year.
So, Simpsons (who has been truely great) drove Honey after replacing the line...the transmission is fine!

Not to muddy the waters too much but I wonder if those lines should be rubber? I've seen a couple of vehicles that had the same problem you had when the radiator was replaced. The original, all-steel lines were cut instead of undoing the connectors at the trans cooler and then rubber hose used to reconnect. Quick and dirty but not as good as the originals. Then again, my Dodge has rubber on the ends that go to the cooler but they are the originals and I'm sure Dodge used nice, high-pressure hoses.

Any Ford guys out there that could add some light?
1993 Ford E150 conversion


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#27
my 01 ford F250 has little short pieces of rubber hose up by the radiator factory. I think they put them there to absorb the vibration of the engine(7.3 diesel). highdesertranger
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#28
(11-16-2017, 05:22 PM)highdesertranger Wrote: my 01 ford F250 has little short pieces of rubber hose up by the radiator factory. I think they put them there to absorb the vibration of the engine(7.3 diesel). highdesertranger

Just checked my '93 E150 and it has all-steel lines (but also has another small dia. rubber hose coming out of the bottom of the rad,too. Don't know what that's for yet). Also checked with my friend and his '94 Chevy 1500 has steel lines.

Anyway, I'm thinking for Kat to avoid future trouble with the RV, she should make sure it's sealed up tight.
1993 Ford E150 conversion


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#29
I asked Simpsons to double check the lines and fittings. They did. All is back to working order. I am going to take a drive tomorrow over the monument. That is a really steep climb up ~8000 feet. I plan to hang out here for a few more days, and take it for a longish drive down to Cortez on Sunday. Just want to really test this before starting out again.
"I never saw a sight that didn't look better looking back"

Kat, Smidge the cat, and Honey

1988 Honeywell.  E350 chassis   21'
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#30
It is not unusual to have flexible lines on fuel as well as transmission cooler. It is required to have the proper material making up the lines. All lines are labeled with their use when new.
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