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Buyers Remorse might be starting...
#21
Artsyguy,

  I will throw my 2 cents in.  To answer a question in your OP,  Is this normal?  Unfortunately yes.  I have a 2012 gmc savana 2500 and I also have a very steep driveway.  Only about a 25 degree incline but still very steep, but it's only 75 feet long.  I've backed on a fairly level portion of my grass and have been unable to make forward progress.  Almost There hit the nail on the head.  The rear end in these things are extremely light.  The original tires are pretty sad too.  Highway tires.  I have planned my build to have several hundred pounds over the rear axle as Almost There suggested.  Temporarily you'll need much more weight on that rear axle.  We don't have lots of snow in winter but I park my van on the street if I think I have to go somewhere.  Those street tires just don't cut it.
Stands Upwind YARC 
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Artsyguy (11-19-2017)
#22
(11-19-2017, 01:59 PM)Artsyguy Wrote:   I had them down to 65lbs, but that triggered the tire sensors and I don't like glowing lights on my dash, so the dealer set them back to 80.
Have I ever mentioned I hate tire sensors? Well, I hate tire sensors. They tend to limit your options by telling you what you should do, as opposed to what is best at the moment. I try not to let a computer tell me what to do unless it's absolutely necessary for the well being of the drive train.
 Fortunately I never had that problem with any but one of my vehicles. I sold that one.
Doing the Van thing since the early eighties.
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highdesertranger (11-19-2017)
#23
(11-19-2017, 01:59 PM)Artsyguy Wrote: I had them down to 65lbs, but that triggered the tire sensors and I don't like glowing lights

That is another gripe I've got the darn TPMS system.  I perform most of my own maintenance including rotating my tires.  After rotating, yep yellow warning light on dash.  The problem is it takes a special "tire relearn" tool so the computer knows where the tire is.  After living with the light for several months I ordered one off of amazon for $23.  Still pissed about that.  I'm not going to take it to the @#$# dealer everytime to reset!!
Stands Upwind YARC 
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#24
(11-19-2017, 02:50 PM)highdesertranger Wrote: question when down to 65psi did it slip on the drive way?  were they underinflated?  what's the minimum psi that doesn't set the sensor off?  highdesertranger

I think I can take the rears down to 70 without tripping the TPS.
2015 Chevy Express 2500 Stealth Van named, Seneca Lodge Too.  See you at a racetrack near you soon!
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#25
(11-19-2017, 03:35 PM)Fgapper2 Wrote: Artsyguy,

  I will throw my 2 cents in.  To answer a question in your OP,  Is this normal?  Unfortunately yes.  I have a 2012 gmc savana 2500 and I also have a very steep driveway.  Only about a 25 degree incline but still very steep, but it's only 75 feet long.  I've backed on a fairly level portion of my grass and have been unable to make forward progress.  Almost There hit the nail on the head.  The rear end in these things are extremely light.  The original tires are pretty sad too.  Highway tires.  I have planned my build to have several hundred pounds over the rear axle as Almost There suggested.  Temporarily you'll need much more weight on that rear axle.  We don't have lots of snow in winter but I park my van on the street if I think I have to go somewhere.  Those street tires just don't cut it.
This is useful me. I'm not sure what I can do to get it heavier, since it's more of a weekend trip van rather than a living full time van. Plan currently was to have one 12v deep cycle battery behind driver seat. 20lb propane tank at passenger rear corner. My Camp Chef stove weighs around 20-30lbs. Those are my heaviest things that I need.  I'll get it figured out for sure, just need to make a few minor changes in driving/parking style. First World problem! Big Grin
2015 Chevy Express 2500 Stealth Van named, Seneca Lodge Too.  See you at a racetrack near you soon!
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#26
You will need water also for wash and drinking.  4  seven gallon containers from walmart full of water is another 200+ lbs.  And if you're like me you've got 200 lbs of toys to bring. Big Grin 

I bet that would get you up and down your driveway.  Except in the snow. Big Grin
Stands Upwind YARC 
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slow2day (11-19-2017)
#27
(11-19-2017, 07:22 PM)gapper2 Wrote: You will need water also for wash and drinking.  4  seven gallon containers from walmart full of water is another 200+ lbs.  And if you're like me you've got 200 lbs of toys to bring. Big Grin 

I bet that would get you up and down your driveway.  Except in the snow. Big Grin

Like I said previously, I'm not living in my van.  I take 3 gal jugs of water with me on a race weekend, and use about 1/2 that.  No room for toys, since I'm rocking a full size bed.  Where I go water and showers are plentiful and free.  I may just throw some concrete slabs under the bed, in the back for the winter and see what happens.  I think it will come down to just resigning myself to the fact that it's just a flatland vehicle and adjust my driving habits from there.  It's really no different than understanding I no longer can park in parking garages.
2015 Chevy Express 2500 Stealth Van named, Seneca Lodge Too.  See you at a racetrack near you soon!
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#28
Sandbags better than concrete.

Secure so can't move in an accident.
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Artsyguy (11-20-2017)
#29
We used to carry in winter what we called "dead dogs" pieces of truck tubes filled with sand folded over on the ends. Extra weight helped and when stuck on ice poured out the sand in front of drive wheels for traction.
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tx2sturgis (11-20-2017)
#30
If the van is always very light, you don't need 80 psi...I run 70 in the rear and 65 up front and that's plenty. 

And yes, you can buy a learning tool to reprogram the TPMS. Not sure how the GM unit works but with the Ford, you get the dashboard computer in learning mode, 3 on-off cycles of the ignition key or something like that, then you use the little keyfob style transmitter at each wheel, and the horn beeps to let you know the computer accepted the current pressure as the correct pressure.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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