Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante
#1
How does the shrinking of these two Utah national monuments affect the nomadic community?
I.e., it probably would be wise to move this up on the priority list of areas to see?
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to Gardenias for this post:
rvpopeye (12-05-2017), FlowerGirl (12-05-2017)
#2
They'll still be there, just so will extractive companies
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to John61CT for this post:
FlowerGirl (12-05-2017), Gardenias (12-04-2017)
#3
It hurts my heart to think about it. Just nauseating. What will go next?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
YARC
Monkeyfoot
She Who Must Be Obeyed
The Nominator
Badge count 4
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to Cammalu for this post:
Gardenias (12-05-2017), FlowerGirl (12-05-2017)
#4
It just depends on how the roads and fences are put in and how well the no trespassing laws are enforced. Navajo people have been trucking firewood to heat with out of there for years and seldom stay on the road and cattle men have grazed cows there for over 100 years.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 1 user says Thank You to bullfrog for this post:
Gardenias (12-05-2017)
#5
I just spent a couple weeks boondocking through southern Utah, including BE and GSE. Nearly all the region is controlled by Forest Service, Park Service or BLM. They seem to do an amazing job of balancing competing needs. There really is no immediate change regarding acccess but there is a huge FUTURE RISK! It's about saving wilderness for our grandkids ...

BLM will still manage the land, but will have to consider extractive uses like mining, drilling, ranching in some wilderness areas that would have been better protected.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to Surly Biker for this post:
Gardenias (12-05-2017), FlowerGirl (12-05-2017)
#6
This news hurts to hear, and I'm feeling doubly bad for the Native Americans....
Hard to discuss this without it turning partisan, so I'll refrain.
Today it's....
Prayers for our Earth...keeping them coming.

Love. Peace. Nature.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to FlowerGirl for this post:
mayble (12-05-2017), Gardenias (12-05-2017)
#7
Bears Ears was best preserved by the fact few people knew what it was and where it was. Now that everyone is trying to preserve it by putting the spot light on it just will make more people come and ruin it. Almost double the visitation in the first few months of this year and four times the damage. Probably be as many people here as there were 1200 years ago when thousands of dwellings were built. Will probably take another 1200 years before this years trash blows away or buries it like it did theirs!
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to bullfrog for this post:
FlowerGirl (12-06-2017), highdesertranger (12-05-2017)
#8
^
Have you been there?  Honestly, that's not close to my recent experience during the spring and fall season. It's beautiful, clean, magnificent in every way.  And the land managers do a great job of preserving wilderness and providing access. 

To say providing greater protection ruins the land doesn't make sense. It's up to each of us to tread lightly and minimize impact.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 1 user says Thank You to Surly Biker for this post:
bullfrog (12-05-2017)
#9
Yes visitor numbers will increase over the centuries / millenia no matter what.

That's the only timescale makes sense for such topics.

Our culture's shortsightedness will be our downfall, and likely within decades. Good riddance.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 2 users say Thank You to John61CT for this post:
bullfrog (12-05-2017), Surly Biker (12-05-2017)
#10
(12-05-2017, 10:06 AM)Surly Biker Wrote: Have you been there?  Honestly, that's not close to my recent experience during the spring and fall season. It's beautiful, clean, magnificent in every way.  And the land managers do a great job of preserving wilderness and providing access. 

To say providing greater protection ruins the land doesn't make sense. It's up to each of us to tread lightly and minimize impact.
I've lived here the past 12 years, you and everybody else that is coming ain't making it any better.  More people means more problems.  Most of the "Land Managers" hadn't even been there until last couple years and they were lucky they didn't get shot when they visited.  We had 2 BLM Rangers that got ran off by the armed cowboys and threatened by the local officals earlier.  After that you had to go find someone if you needed help.  Glen Canyon Recreation Area Rangers tried to help out this year by sending LEs from Halls Crossing via Mulley Point to Hite as well as one Utah DNR officer from Bullfrog.  Average response time from 2 to 4 hours if you were on pavement.  One rescue took over 10 hours just to get there.  This is what happens when the government does this without funding that ranching, hunting and mining provide. Come back in a few years and see if it got better or worst. For now it just takes away desperately needed resources from the other areas we are trying to "preserve".
Add Thank You Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2018 MyBB Group.