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Propane Fridge process...
#1
So since we have had the trailer, we haven't really gotten a chance too boondock with it yet, and have been plugged into 30amp at an rv park for 2 1/2 months now.

We get back to traveling end of December, and def won't be plug into to shore power for a good while I hope.

What is your process when traveling having a propane fridge? I've heard its not safe to drive with your propane on. I imagine for the first day or two we will manage about 6 hours of driving each day maybe. So what do you do when you know your fridge will be off for a good while?

I considered freezing half filled water bottles and putting a couple in the freezer before heading out.  I reckon we could just not put anything in the fridge until we know we are gonna be sitting still for awhile and it can keep cold.

I'm coming from having a 12volt fridge in a van that ran all the time, so just trying to get some tricks and tips on propane refrigerators.
16ft Coachman Clipper is the home, and the E150 Pulls it. Live Free(er)
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#2
is it a 3 way or a 2 way. if it's a 3 way put it on 12v when driving. it is illegal to have the propane on when refueling. I thought it was illegal while driving but I guess not, seems like common sense to me to leave it off while driving. the frozen bottles will work, my buddy used to do that. highdesertranger
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#3
I run my fridge (in a class c) on propane while driving. Never had a problem and have talked to lots of folks who do the same. 

I try to remember to shut it completely off when I stop to refuel. 

I've also run the generator while going down the road if it's really hot out and I know I'll be leaving the animals in the rig when I get to my destination. (usually walmart), so the fridge runs off the generator in that situation. A generator needs to be run for at least an hour or so per month anyway, under load, so that kills two birds with one stone.  (My generator runs off gas from the main tank)

I do shut off the hot water heater and furnace when traveling though.
2017 Coachmen Freelander Micro 
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WanderLoveJosh (12-14-2017)
#4
With the fridge in a trailer it's probably a 2-way.

So, you can't get there from here.

Next!

Hey just kidding....have you tried buying block or dry ice and put that in the fridge just before you hit the road?

Leaving the propane and the burner on means that the flame could blow out, or if you have an accident...well...we've all seen RV's burned to the ground at the side of the road.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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#5
I assume its a two way, but I'm hardly right... don't know if this pic helps determine that.


   
16ft Coachman Clipper is the home, and the E150 Pulls it. Live Free(er)
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#6
Don't take that wrong, I just would not want a flame burning in MY vehicle or trailer while driving.

If that was a 3-way fridge it would probably have a DC-AC switch...do you have the manual handy? Let's make sure.

Or, if you have the make and model number, we can do a quick google search.

If it DOES have a DC option, then you can run a heavy cable that will handle 15 amps or so, from your truck battery all the way back to the RV battery, with protections of course, and a switch. (3-way fridges require a lot of power on DC) 

This power cable will let that fridge run on DC (going down the road) without depleting the trailer battery.

Another option is to have LOTS of solar panels on the trailer that will balance that load. 

It might just be simpler to have a large ice chest to fill up with the food and some ice while traveling, that's the low-tech way that I did it.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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WanderLoveJosh (12-14-2017)
#7
Yes, it's a 2 way... 110 & propane. But as tex said, verify this. The model & serial number along with the manufacturer will get you started in your search. In auto mode it'll detect that you're plugged in and run off electric, and detect that you've unplugged and run off propane. And of course in gas mode it'll just run on propane. Countless people travel with the refer on with no issues. There is a safe operating level that the refer needs to be at, but hilly terrain doesn't have the refer at an angle long enough to cause harm. One item that is very helpful, and IMO should be had by all, is this... https://www.arprv.com. Although so many people do travel without incident while having their refer on propane, when a fire occurs in a motorhome or trailer there's a good chance it started at the refer while on propane.
Cheers, Rick
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The following 2 users say Thank You to rm.w/aview for this post:
WanderLoveJosh (12-14-2017), highdesertranger (12-14-2017)
#8
I am not endorsing the product in that link that Rick posted because I have no idea about the product. but it's a great read and anybody with a propane refer should read it. highdesertranger
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WanderLoveJosh (12-14-2017), rm.w/aview (12-14-2017)
#9
I'd like to add that our refrigerator will hold the chill for 5-6 hours after turning off power (gas & electric) to it. A fully stocked refer will help hold the temperature, as well as the frozen items. The temperature will rise of course, but it'll still be in the safe zone for food. If you're thawing something for dinner all the better, and of course frozen water bags or bottles will help. Test your refrigerator while you're still plugged in by turning it off and checking your thermometer periodically.
The interstate system in the US has a limit on how severe the grades can be, but the roads that we travel mostly do not fall into that category. And since we have yet to get the ARP for the RV (prolly will in a few months), when we know that our travel will take us on roads with grades greater than 7% we'll stock up or freeze items while we can, then shut 'er down for travel which in most cases is no more than 4 hours. The short ups & downs don't have as much worry as the long steep grades.
Cheers, Rick
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#10
The 3way in my camper gets about 2 1/2 to 3 weeks on a bottle I leave it on 24/7.
2015 RTR  adrian.schafgans@gmail.com
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rm.w/aview (12-14-2017)


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