Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Feedback please on this idea for having a van plus trailer
#11
You and your driving skills/judgment will be the most important factor. Manufactured camping trailers have low hanging tanks made of plastic with little protection, are heavy with those tanks full and at 20' would most likely limit where you could take them off good graded roads without damaging them. Some people resort to a 4x4 truck with topper or a short 5th wheel pulled with a 4x4 truck. Some seem to do well with vans with a locker and some recovery tools but an older heavy 20' camper pulled by a built out van would probably be hard on the drive train. Lots of people use a toyhauler to get close then park, unload and explore on a purpose built ATV or UTV with enough camping gear for a few weeks. jimindenver does a pretty good job with his rig even with the weight of alot of solar maybe he will post.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 1 user says Thank You to bullfrog for this post:
free2enjoy (12-16-2017)
#12
(12-16-2017, 03:08 PM)WanderingCanuck Wrote: Have you considered a cube van or moving van/truck with some space above the cab?  One of these has been high on my list of considerations.  You get lots of easily configurable space, a big engine that's meant for hauling and rear wheel drive (usually dual).  You can choose the length - 10', 12', 16', 20' and partition the interior as you need.

Stick a company logo on the side if you aren't trying to be stealthy and as far as anyone else is concerned, it's just your delivery vehicle.

I need the van to be my daily driver so the choices have been the Sprinter, ProMaster, Nissan NV, and the Transit.  

No way with the Sprinter...not buying a Mercedes product.  

The ProMaster for my needs won't work because of the front wheel drive and the rear axle.  It's probably ok for towing a trailer around town but I doubt it's a good choice for towing a camper up and down mountains.  

The Nissan is actually too small even with the high top and the high top looks like an afterthought.  

That leaves the Transit.  I can get it in silver, the medium roof is perfect while not looking like an ice cream truck like the Nissan high roof, and I liked the truck suspension in the rear.  I think the turbocharged engine will be the ticket for the mountain towing but I still need to learn more.  I also like the Transit's modern cockpit.

The box trucks will simply be too big for being a daily driver.  

Likely, I would be buying an end of year closeout deal.  And for the camper it likely would be on that is 2-4 years old.  

For advertising, I would design magnetic signs using the same graphics as my website.  I do all the design work.  When we hit the road we will put the signs up and when we are ready to head for a campsite, we would already have the signs down.  We won't be advertising to our fellow campers, just making friends and enjoying time wherever we are.
Add Thank You Reply
#13
(12-16-2017, 06:15 PM)akrvbob Wrote: You’re going to be an RV and you will be stuck camping with the RV crowd—is that remote enough for you?

It’s far too limiting for me so I sold my 6x10 cargo trailer and travel in just my van.

To be fair, some RVers do go back past the RV crowd, but they usually have a 4x4 tow vehicle and still can’t go where I go with a 2wd van because the trailer limits them.
Thanks Bob!

I currently live in a campground fulltime in my 5th wheel in South Florida and definitely don't want that as my normal routine even though the people here are wonderful and the campground is in the agricultural district outside the metropolis.  I don't want to be in an RV marina.  

But I don't want to leave my business behind.  My intent is to live on less that we make from the business and grow our wealth month by month.  

Maybe what we can do is drop off the camper for a few days at a time somewhere (campground storage) and take the van for some boondocking with tents?  I intend to have solar on the van roof and portable solar too.  I was also planning on having an additional water tank in the van to use for the trailer, etc..., so maybe building this flexibility into the van will help add options to what we are able to do.

I watched your video today of the couple that bought a Winnebago rental and got a lot out of that...thanks for all you do!

Andrew
Add Thank You Reply
#14
(12-16-2017, 07:48 PM)bullfrog Wrote: You and your driving skills/judgment will be the most important factor.  Manufactured camping trailers have low hanging tanks made of plastic with little protection, are heavy with those tanks full and at 20' would most likely limit where you could take them off good graded roads without damaging them.   Some people resort to a 4x4 truck with topper or a short 5th wheel pulled with a 4x4 truck.  Some seem to do well with vans with a locker and some recovery tools but an older heavy 20' camper pulled by a built out van would probably be hard on the drive train.  Lots of people use a toyhauler to get close then park, unload and explore on a purpose built ATV or UTV with enough camping gear for a few weeks. jimindenver does a pretty good job with his rig even with the weight of alot of solar maybe he will post.

Those are all excellent insights for me, thanks!

To avoid the weight, I'm looking at the flexible panels even though they can be damaged easier.  It would be easy to carry spares and use them also as portable panels.  

The trailers I'm looking at would be around 4000lbs empty.  I was looking at 14-16' single axle ones but I'm not sure a single axle is the best choice since if I get a flat, I could keep towing the trailer enough to get to a safe place to change the tire??
Add Thank You Reply
#15
(12-16-2017, 08:09 PM)free2enjo Wrote: The trailers I'm looking at would be around 4000lbs empty.  I was looking at 14-16' single axle ones but I'm not sure a single axle is the best choice since if I get a flat, I could keep towing the trailer enough to get to a safe place to change the tire??
I looked at these vans a few years ago, was amazed by their roominess, but was struck by the torque curves on some - to really get to the 5000 lb tow capability, those V6s needed to be at 4000 rpm. Don't remember which that was, but if you're planning on towing with one, might be worth a good look.
Add Thank You Reply
The following 1 user says Thank You to drysailor for this post:
free2enjoy (12-16-2017)
#16
(12-16-2017, 06:15 PM)akrvbob Wrote: You’re going to be an RV and you will be stuck camping with the RV crowd—is that remote enough for you?

I know this is probably a dumb question but considering the limitations of towing a cargo trailer and being with the RV crowd, are there still plenty of BLM areas to pick from?
No hurry ... No worry
Add Thank You Reply
The following 1 user says Thank You to BikeBoomer for this post:
free2enjoy (12-16-2017)
#17
(12-16-2017, 08:47 PM)drysailor Wrote: I looked at these vans a few years ago, was amazed by their roominess, but was struck by the torque curves on some - to really get to the 5000 lb tow capability, those V6s needed to be at 4000 rpm. Don't remember which that was, but if you're planning on towing with one, might be worth a good look.

Thanks, I will definitely take a look along those lines.  :-)
Add Thank You Reply
#18
(12-16-2017, 08:47 PM)drysailor Wrote: I looked at these vans a few years ago, was amazed by their roominess, but was struck by the torque curves on some - to really get to the 5000 lb tow capability, those V6s needed to be at 4000 rpm. Don't remember which that was, but if you're planning on towing with one, might be worth a good look.

Maybe this Wiki page can offer insights into the turbocharged V6 that is available on the Transit van

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_EcoBoost_engine
Add Thank You Reply
#19
(12-16-2017, 07:51 PM)free2enjoy Wrote: I need the van to be my daily driver so the choices have been the Sprinter, ProMaster, Nissan NV, and the Transit. 

I'm down to the same list myself, favouring the Transit and ProMaster at the moment. My only stumbling block is kayak storage, which is where the cube van idea comes in.
What doesn't kill me makes me smarter
Add Thank You Reply
#20
(12-16-2017, 09:22 PM)WanderingCanuck Wrote: I'm down to the same list myself, favouring the Transit and ProMaster at the moment. My only stumbling block is kayak storage, which is where the cube van idea comes in.

I really liked the ProMaster for many reasons, but that front wheel drive kind of makes it seem like a gigantic minivan and I'm thinking for towing it would be a nightmare.  

I liked that the floor deck is so low, that the front legroom with the sideways mounted engine is excellent, and that it is the lowest price of any of these.  

I'm about 4 years from likely hitting the road.....I would love an electric option to become available.  I currently drive a Chevy Volt and love electric drive.
Add Thank You Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2018 MyBB Group.