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Feedback please on this idea for having a van plus trailer
#21
remember signs advertising your business = commercial. all commercial vehicles must stop at weigh stations. just a thought. a 4x4 towing a lifted converted cargo trailer can go a lot of places. highdesertranger
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bullfrog (12-23-2017), free2enjoy (12-17-2017)
#22
Have you considered Sportsmobile? Or even a 4x4 service body Van? Sounds like you're settled on new but, with the right platform, the used market can be a wonderful value. In Canada, how writing off equipment works, owning can be just as good at getting money back as leasing a vehicle. Not sure of the logistics south of the border though.

Moreover, if you have the time and are willing, a custom cargo trailer would be MILES a ahead for durability over a factory hard side RV. The trailer will most likely not enjoy anything but gravel roads.
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free2enjoy (12-17-2017)
#23
(12-17-2017, 10:51 AM)TubaDoor Wrote: Have you considered Sportsmobile? Or even a 4x4 service body Van? Sounds like you're settled on new but, with the right platform, the used market can be a wonderful value. In Canada, how writing off equipment works, owning can be just as good at getting money back as leasing a vehicle. Not sure of the logistics south of the border though.

Moreover, if you have the time and are willing, a custom cargo trailer would be MILES a ahead for durability over a factory hard side RV. The trailer will most likely not enjoy anything but gravel roads.

Regardless, you're on to something: Self-contained and able to work anywhere you want? Truly hope that works out for you! That is my ideal but working as a mobile door mechanic/tuba player seems out of reach and/or totally unwieldy to pull this off. Good luck! 
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free2enjoy (12-17-2017)
#24
(12-16-2017, 07:48 PM)bullfrog Wrote: jimindenver does a pretty good job with his rig even with the weight of alot of solar maybe he will post.



My 25 foot bunk house is 4200 pounds dry and running around 7000 pounds loaded to the gills. It is lifted and pulled by a Ford Expedition 4x4. I do have limitations as far as how tight of a switchback I can take and a deep short gulch will get the tail to drag if I do not take it at a long angle and even then I have to watch how far I tip the rig. Other than that I can tell you that I do not see too many vans on the jeep trails.

Now then, off road is not gravel, It's not wash boards, to me it means dropping down to 4x4 low and crawling over rocks at a speed so slow that it takes a hour to go a mile. It is tiring paying attention to the placement of 8 wheels knowing that it isn't where the truck goes but rather where the trailer will follow. With no spotter I get out multiple times checking clearances over and over. It is worth the effort if and when I feel like being alone.
Sparky created, (Sparkles on some Saturday nights)  Max the Wonder puppy approved

2011 Ameri-lite 25 ft bunkhouse with 750w of solar and a 675 Ah bank
2003 Ford Expedition with 435w of tilting solar.
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free2enjoy (12-17-2017)
#25
(12-17-2017, 11:25 AM)jimindenver Wrote: It is tiring paying attention to the placement of 8 wheels knowing that it isn't where the truck goes but rather where the trailer will follow. With no spotter I get out multiple times checking clearances over and over. It is worth the effort if and when I feel like being alone.

Would some strategically-placed cameras be worth the expense and effort, perhaps?  They're getting so small and cheap these days!  A video switcher so you can swap between 8 views, wow like 20 bucks on Amazon.

Not having to always stop and get out, priceless.  Maybe?
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#26
Depending on your DIY abilities, building yourself a custom cargo trailer conversion might have a lot of benefits for what you are proposing. Due to the high cost of light weight travel trailers, and the poor construction of most TTs I went the custom cargo trailer route. This way you can outfit it to meet your own personal needs without extra weight of all that fragile stuff they fill RVs with. With RVs you get to drag around a lot of built in stuff that will not be durable. A converted cargo trailer can be much lighter and much more durable. There are a lot of videos on YouTube for inspiration. Another CT advantage is stealth. Another CT advantage is registration. My state has one time registration for cargo trailers and annual registration for TTs. There may be some disadvantages that I have not encountered yet with the CT conversion, but so far I am glad that I did it myself, and I love my CT conversion.

Sent from my SM-G900T using Tapatalk
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free2enjoy (12-20-2017)
#27
I would be wary of taking the Transit on remote sites. I really like the Transit but the clearance particularly in the back is really low and tires are very small. 

I did a test drive and got stuck / spun my tires in a couple of places in the desert that never happened with the Chevy Expresss/GMC Savana that I eventually got. 

It was the poor traction and low clearance which made me decide the Transit was not for me.
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free2enjoy (12-20-2017)
#28
Just for fun, here's a Transit 4x4 short video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aK3spfaRJf0
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#29
cortttt Wrote:It was the poor traction and low clearance which made me decide the Transit was not for me.

There is a 'factory' 4x4 Transit available (outsourced from the factory to a converter), if I remember correctly.   And the normal RWD is available with a mechanical limited slip diff.   Transit does have the least clearance of the fullsize vans, but I imagine driver skill is more important than the stats.

OP:  since you are 6'3" I'd recommend the High Roof (6' 9.5") rather than Medium Roof (6').
frater/jason @ RTR 1000ft E of main camp on "dark blue" road
blog | Promaster van | offtopic answers
"I would unite with anybody to do right; and with nobody to do wrong" F. Douglass
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free2enjoy (12-27-2017)
#30
(12-27-2017, 06:22 PM)frater secessus Wrote: There is a 'factory' 4x4 Transit available (outsourced from the factory to a converter), if I remember correctly.   And the normal RWD is available with a mechanical limited slip diff.   Transit does have the least clearance of the fullsize vans, but I imagine driver skill is more important than the stats.

OP:  since you are 6'3" I'd recommend the High Roof (6' 9.5") rather than Medium Roof (6').

I looked at the medium and high roof.   I wouldn’t be living in the van and the medium roof was very good for what i need the van for.   :-)
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frater secessus (12-28-2017)


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