Willin’ to be movin’
#11
Shuttle vans are on my personal list. I live in a ski town and they have some newer 4x4 models that look awesome. FWIW, a pickup chassis, if you can find it, does have some advantages - stock 4x4, a bit tougher construction, and easier to work on. Box trucks built on a pickup chassis are definitely around.
-Douglas Tooley

My Blog
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#12
Good info. What year and make are you interested in. After reading the van breakdown sticky. I am leaning towards a GMC. I had a Safari for a few years that held up well for many years.
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#13
I'm not a mechanic, but the rep on Chevys and Fords are that Ford is more reliable but Chevy easier to fix.
-Douglas Tooley

My Blog
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#14
Of of the options on my short list is a cargo trailer, to pull behind my Suburban. It would be relatively "unfinished" inside, like some of the smaller toyhaulers, so I could fold up some of the furnishings to accommodate something like a small motorcycle... or even a portable bicycle repair shop. The point behind it would be to avoid having to use the Burb for short trips and as much local transportation as I could get away with... as it's a thirsty beast.
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#15
I am having similar thoughts. I really don’t see the need to build out a trailer with all sorts of fixed cabinetry, tables and what not.

Even a bed can be as easy as a roll up pad and a sleeping bag thus leaving space to work and stretch out with feeling cramped.

Folding tables and chairs make sense to me as does furniture and cabinets on casters which can be moved around and removed
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#16
Welcome Chongolio! I watched a couple of your videos and subscribed. I like how you are using your videos as expressions of art - AND - that they are almost all 5 minutes or shorter. Smile
It's little I care what path I take,
And where it leads it's little I care,
But out of this house, lest my heart break,
I must go, and off somewhere! 
 ~ Edna St. Vincent Millay
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DLTooley (01-05-2018)
#17
Cooool! Thanks for watchin’ and subscribin’ Glad to know you like them.

For the most part I enjoy the creative process but also feel there is a lot of room to grow and experiment.

Personally, I like watching shorter vids and it keeps me on point when making them.

More recent updates will begin after my next upload which will be the last of my New Mexico adventure.

The challenge I face is how to document my move into the nomad lifestyle without the narcissism as well as make the video interesting.
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dawnann7 (01-05-2018)
#18
(01-04-2018, 03:16 PM)Chongolio Wrote: I am having similar thoughts. I really don’t see the need to build out a trailer with all sorts of fixed cabinetry, tables and what not.

Even a bed can be as easy as a roll up pad and a sleeping bag thus leaving space to work and stretch out with feeling cramped.

Folding tables and chairs make sense to me as does furniture and cabinets on casters which can be moved around and removed

Another benefit to this: If your living gear can be packed up in the front of the trailer, along the sides, or even suspended from the roof, any open space in your cargo trailer can be used to haul... cargo!
Keep an eye on sites like Uship and the like, and you may find a payload heading in your direction. Great way for your home to generate some income while you travel.
Some do better than others, but even if it only helps ease the costs of travel, it's a win.

There was an episode of Shipping Wars (in which they find their worst drivers and film them bumbling about) in which one of the drivers had to move an expensive wedding cake. She did this, in 90+ heat, in a standard cargo trailer with no climate control at all.
It did not turn out well, and she even mentioned to the shipper (and during the drive) that she hopes the cake isn't destroyed. Oy... I'd have shown her the door right away...

I was sitting there thinking... if you had an insulated trailer with an a/c on it... problem solved!!!
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#19
I have an unpack type set up in my truck. It works great on public lands, and is pretty quick with practice. It is not stealthy, and it would be nice to have enough room to sleep without unpacking. That could definitely be done with a cargo van.

I like Chongolio's videos too. Great production, especially the art, attitude, and shorter length!
-Douglas Tooley

My Blog
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#20
(01-05-2018, 10:25 AM)velojym Wrote: Another benefit to this: If your living gear can be packed up in the front of the trailer, along the sides, or even suspended from the roof, any open space in your cargo trailer can be used to haul... cargo!
Keep an eye on sites like Uship and the like, and you may find a payload heading in your direction. Great way for your home to generate some income while you travel.
Some do better than others, but even if it only helps ease the costs of travel, it's a win.

There was an episode of Shipping Wars (in which they find their worst drivers and film them bumbling about) in which one of the drivers had to move an expensive wedding cake. She did this, in 90+ heat, in a standard cargo trailer with no climate control at all.
It did not turn out well, and she even mentioned to the shipper (and during the drive) that she hopes the cake isn't destroyed. Oy... I'd have shown her the door right away...

I was sitting there thinking... if you had an insulated trailer with an a/c on it... problem solved!!!

Definitely will check out Uship gigs. Ain’t nothing wrong with putting some cabbage in your pocket while out seeing the world!
Live Wild • Play Loud • Fly Free
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