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Let's talk about heating with diesel.
#31
(12-31-2017, 03:15 PM)gsfish Wrote: Here's one.
http://dickinsonmarine.com/

Guy


My boat had this exact heater, or a different brand with the same design. No forced air. If you were sitting in it’s vicinity you were warm, mostly due to radiant heat. But I ended up using a 120V forced air space heater all the time because it was much more effective.

I have seen little devices that sit on this diesel heater and blow some air...

Whether via circulating hot air or water thru the floor I think you need to heat the air to really feel warm. Or at least I do.

I’d go for a diesel powered recirculating water type heater... and embiggen your battery system so you can run it all night.


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#32
I'm musing over these bunk heaters some more.

So, they can be set up to heat the engine through the coolant, and some can be set up to make hot water for the RV plumbing... but the same unit cold not heat both the engine and potable water, correct?

The thing that turned me off that one model is it dumps its water in freezing temps. I understand that's a safety but that's useless to me as I'm interning to build a system that operates at -20F. Can that thing be installed in the living space and vented outside?
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#33
(01-02-2018, 03:27 PM)highdesertranger Wrote: also note on that Dickerson Heater it appears to be gravity fed. so the fuel tank must be mounted above heater. might want to look into that. highdesertranger

On my boat it had a tank well below it, but the tank was pressurized, so it had a little rod you would use to pump it up. Despite it being out of the way, and hard to get to, that was never a problem for me, I had to pump it every 3-4 months or effectively twice a year since half the year I wasn’t using the heater.



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#34
It seems the primary objection to furnaces is battery drain for the fans. I believe a hydronic solution could be made that uses much less battery— instead of running the heated liquid thru a radiator and pushing air thru the radiator with a fan— a necessarily high amperage draw— the lines with the hot liquid could simply run under a series of aluminum heat sinks. These are cheap and widely available and are how CPUs used to be cooled. You could even drill a hole thru a block of aluminum and attach the heat sink to that. They are designed for radiating heat are super effective at it (they have very high surface area for the space.). The loop of hot liquid could run around the interior walls once (much less distance than cross crossing under the floor, and thus less powerful pump needed to move the liquid) and thru many such heat sinks. Then your only electrical draw is the heater control system and a peristaltic liquid pump, which should be pretty low since it doesn’t need as much energy as a even one fan.


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#35
Technomad, I wonder why you're having such a poor experience with your Newport? I had  Bering model in my 33 foot sailboat and was never cold, down into the low double digits outside. Exact same burner as your heater. I wonder if there's a problem with the install or adjustment.

I used a Caframo 12v fan to ush air from the ceiling to the cabin sole and that kept air from stratifying and circulated air through the boat. I tried heating the boat with electric heaters, but it took two heaters tokeep up.
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#36
There are air blower units more electrically efficient, figure 20-30AH per 24 hours if used that much.

RV style furnaces are the worst.
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#37
(01-10-2018, 08:58 PM)TMG51 Wrote: I'm musing over these bunk heaters some more.

1) So, they can be set up to heat the engine through the coolant, and some can be set up to make hot water for the RV plumbing... but the same unit cold not heat both the engine and potable water, correct?

2) The thing that turned me off that one model is it dumps its water in freezing temps. I understand that's a safety but that's useless to me as I'm interning to build a system that operates at -20F. Can that thing be installed in the living space and vented outside?

*bump*

Does anyone know the answers to these two questions?
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#38
(01-14-2018, 12:28 AM)TMG51 Wrote: *bump*

Does anyone know the answers to these two questions?

The bunk heaters that I am directly familiar with just heat air in the living space.

What or which model dumps water? A link or make/model would be helpful, even though I have no experience with something that does that.
Never trust a camp cook with lots of shiny new pans...
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#39
Webasto, Espar make liquid heating models, not just air-blowing, which I guess "bunk heater" implies.

"Parking heaters" is another search term, the liquid ones are "hydronic" systems

Planar is gaining market share as cheaper, a lot of Chinese knockoffs as well, but parts, service & support are the hard part in the US since most states still allow trucks to idle while parked.

As for the dumping issue, never heard of that. These units I'm talking about here are designed for arctic conditions, use an antifreeze solution, different concentrations for different climates.

So whether or not the engine coolant is in the loop is a design/installation detail, not a feature of what model you choose.

It would be possible to set up valves to include the block when needed in winter, bypass it otherwise for fuel efficiency.

The water for human use is never heated directly, only through heat exchanger "calorifiers". So that's a Yes to Q #1.

Air exchangers aka radiators, with or without blowers are used to heat the living space(s).
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#40
Oh, about dumping water, I was referring to this from Webasto. Watch the "how it works" video and it says it automatically drains in cold weather.

https://www.webasto.com/gb/markets-produ...l-top-evo/

Or read this guy's blog post.
http://roadtreking.com/winterized-again-...to-heater/

I assume this is because this model heats potable water directly, not cycling a coolant system to transfer heat...
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