Photos of my Camps in 2015

Grand Tetons NP, Wyoming

Grand Tetons NP, Wyoming

I’m posting this on January 2, 2016 and since it’s become common to end the year with posts summarizing it, I’ve decided do it as well. Because I traveled more this year than most  I thought I would do a post with nothing but pictures of the many campsites I had this year. Because I traveled so much, I had a whole bunch of them and this isn’t all of them, there were too many to include them all in one post!

Big Horn National Fores (NF) Wyoming

Big Horn National Forest (NF) Wyoming

When I’m traveling into new areas, I’m pretty much blind when I get there so I have to discover it for myself. I’ve told you before how I use my Benchmark and DeLorme Atlas to find Forest Roads and just drive down them until I find I campsite. I almost always want to go back far enough that I won’t have anyone else camping near me, so in these pictures you’ll rarely see anyone else nearby.

Coconino NF, Sedona, Arizona

Coconino NF, Sedona, Arizona

Rarely do I choose them for their beauty; instead they just happen to be along the way to my next destination. But, I’m going to that place because of its exceptional beauty so it works out that many of my camps are in beautiful areas.

Monument Valley--Arizona

Monument Valley–Arizona

Quite a few of these camps were just one night because I just got lucky to find them in the perfect place between destinations. Others I stayed at for a longer time, maybe even up to a week or two because I stayed there multiple times. The only exception was I stayed at the Moab camp for about a month while I waited for the weather to warm up and the snow to melt further into the Rockies.

Moab, Utah

Moab, Utah

It’s very easy to spend a month at Moab because it’s a great little town and has incredible beauty all around it. It has two National Parks (Arches and Canyonlands NP) a great State Park (Deadhorse Point SP) and the Colorado River to play in and take photographs all around. Moab is a Nature Photographers and an Adventurers heaven on earth!!

West Yellowstone, Montana

West Yellowstone, Montana

Now, as you look at the photos, I hope you’ll compare the places I’ve lived in the last year with where you’ve lived. If you’re still living in a stick-n-brick house, where would you rather wake up every morning?

Prescott, Arizona

Prescott, Arizona

The same four, white walls on the same street with the same neighbors, going to the same job, watching the same TV shows, only to do the exact same thing you did yesterday–knowing you’re going to be there (or somewhere just like it) for the rest of your life? Or would you rather be a nomad, waking up in a new and stunning place whenever you chose in a new beautiful camp in a constantly different place with all new things to see and do?

Kamas High Camp, Utah

Kamas High Camp, Utah

With the constant change of scenery there is no way you’re going to be bored or find life monotonous or tedious. Once you make the transition from a “time-clock” mind to a “wild” mind your eyes and senses will slowly be restored and you’ll be able to see the world around you and be amazed at how different each place is and how entertaining the differences can be. Cody and I take walks at every camp and the flowers, trees, soil, rocks, vegetation, animal life and even the sky is different at all of them and has a very different feel or vibe to it. It’s an adventure and a sustained joy to explore and connect to each one.

BLM Land, Cody Wyoming

BLM Land, Cody Wyoming

Many of you feel the tug to live free and wild but you’re intimidated about some of the difficulties you’ll face. It’s true that there are many sacrifices to be made to live the life of a Nomad, but it’s my hope that seeing these many camps I’ve enjoyed this year will give you even a hint of how much more you get than what you give up.

Bear Tooth Highway, Montana

Bear Tooth Highway, Montana

You’ll sacrifice the most unimportant and menial things in life and regain the most vital and essential thing in life, a connection to nature and through it to your true self. To me that’s worth any price!

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

So I hope you enjoy this little trip down memory  lane of what was one of the very best years of my life and I hope it provides you a little motivation to do whatever it takes to live a true and authentic human life, the Nomadic life

Gardiner, Montana

Gardiner, Montana

I’m making Videos on my good friends James and Kyndal’s YouTube Channel. See them here:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_W_E5SFCxwpSOaqMjOOBTg

(The Rubber Tramp Rendezvous in Quartzsite, Arizona starts in three days and with so many of you are on your way here, I’ve made a video tour of Quartzsite showing the most important things a nomad needs to find. See it here:)

If the video doesn’t appear, click or cut and paste this into your browser:
//youtu.be/m8Dd_x3x9Bs

Thanks for supporting this site by using these links to Amazon. I’ll make a small percentage on your purchase and it won’t cost you anything, even if you buy something different.

CLICK HERE TO SHOP AMAZON.COM

Coconino NF, Flagstaff, Arizona

Coconino NF, Flagstaff, Arizona

Snowy River Range, Wyoming

Snowy River Range, Wyoming

Medicine Bow NF, Wyoming

Medicine Bow NF, Wyoming

BLM land Quartzsite, Arizona

BLM land Quartzsite, Arizona

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Sedona, Arizona

Sedona, Arizona

BLM land-Ehrenberg, Arizona

BLM land-Ehrenberg, Arizona

Smith River camp, Wyoming

Smith River camp, Wyoming

Gardiner, MontanaGardiner, Montana

BLM land, Wyoming

BLM land, Wyoming

Nephi. Utah

Nephi. Utah

 

BLM land, Capital Reef, NP Utah

BLM land, Capital Reef, NP Utah

Bryce, NP Utah

Bryce, NP Utah

Kamas, Utah

Kamas, Utah

Big Horn NF, Wyoming

Big Horn NF, Wyoming

BLM land, Utah

BLM land, Utah

Idaho

Idaho

Near Sturgis, South Dakota

Near Sturgis, South Dakota

Bob
About

I've been a full-time VanDweller for 12 years and I love it. I hope to never live in a house again!

50 comments on “Photos of my Camps in 2015
  1. Thank you for sharing all of those photos with us. It is neat to see your year of camping in one post, visually. That white van of yours is becoming quite famous! 🙂 You are an excellent photographer, and I appreciate how much you share. I hope 2016 is even better for you!
    Jim Schmechel recently posted…who is God?My Profile

  2. Cathy (SnowGypsy) says:

    I agree, awesome photos! I really enjoyed the tour of Quartzite. I think the video will help people a lot. I know when I have went into an unknown area when traveling that one can end up panicked when everything is foreign to them. They recognize nothing and have no markers as to wear they are or where they are going.

  3. BeckyIO says:

    Awesome recap Bob! I’m drooling over these camp locations and hope this year I’ll be able to spend more time in these kind of places. 🙂

    Also wanted to let you know I’m going to be “late” to RTR. My fridge died in TX and I’ve been waiting for the Casita factory to open up after the holidays to get it replaced and/or fixed. If they can get me in tomorrow I could theoretically make it by the work-camping seminar on the 8th but it’s 50/50 at best right now.
    BeckyIO recently posted…Haslet CamperForce ReviewMy Profile

    • Bob Bob says:

      Thanks Becky! I saw on your blog that yo might be late–I’ll keep my finger crossed! Either way, it’ll be good to see you again!
      Bob

  4. Jeff Johnston says:

    Photos are awsome! Looks like you found the pot of gold in the picture of the end of the rainbow touching your van! Where is the leprechaun? LOL

  5. Bob Baar says:

    Great recap Bob. Cheap rv living is the first email I always open, love to see your posts, there is always something I learn or enjoy.the photographs are spectacular, I am envious of all those beautiful campsites. I hope 2016 is even better.

  6. Marshall says:

    Fantastic shots Bob! Thanks!

    I noticed that when you took the shot at the Tetons you had the tent up. Does the forestry service or whatever mandate a tent? I ask because they do here in FL at Ocala. A tent must be up to stay overnight. They do not allow overnight camping in a van in dispersed locations. You are supposed to stay in the tent at night, but we have never been checked on after dark and stay the nights in the van.

    Are they like that out west? So far in all our travels that was only mentioned to us at Ocala. Thanks.

    • Bob Bob says:

      Marshall, I just use the tent to hold my site and as a model for photos. I’ve never had to set up a tent as a condition of staying in a place but that is another reason to carry one just in case.
      Bob

  7. I await the continuation of your summer travel reports.
    Al Christensen recently posted…I think this is the egg Airstreams hatch fromMy Profile

  8. Tammi says:

    Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous!!! And the Wyoming pictures still call to me the loudest. Thanks again, Bob, for taking us along on your journeys.

  9. Steve says:

    Bob, I have a few questions.
    1. I noticed that you have a tent set up in the first pic. What did you use it for? Was it worth taking and setting up at times? I am worried that it will take up valuable space and not really serve a useful purpose.
    2. I know you camp on the BLM lands and such. Are you ever bothered by rangers, law enforcement, or other people that are out there also?
    3. How much water do you keep with you and where did you replenish it along the way?
    4. Was there gas stations within reasonable distances so that you didn’t have to constantly worry about running out of gas? You said that you would go back pretty far to some campsites and that could prove to be a problem if you were low on gas and the stations were far apart.
    5. When you are out there do you use your bucket for going to the bathroom or just do the cat holes. And if you do use the bucket and trash bags, how do you store it till you get to a place to dispose of it?

    I just have to say that you are in some beautiful places. I guess that for the little inconveniences or extra things or doing them differently is well worth what you get in return. I will see.

    • Bob Bob says:

      Steve, I’ll answer your questions in bold:
      1. I noticed that you have a tent set up in the first pic. What did you use it for? Was it worth taking and setting up at times? I am worried that it will take up valuable space and not really serve a useful purpose. I only use it as a model for photos and to hold my space. If space is limited don’t take it.
      2. I know you camp on the BLM lands and such. Are you ever bothered by rangers, law enforcement, or other people that are out there also? Not in the summer when I’m traveling because i never stay in one place long enough to be a problem. In the winter around Quartzsite it is a problem but I just go to where it isn’t.
      3. How much water do you keep with you and where did you replenish it along the way? I carry 5-10 gallons and I’ll get it at convenience stores, ranger stations or anywhere I can. You learn to look around and find them. I also carry a filter and will get creek water at times.
      4. Was there gas stations within reasonable distances so that you didn’t have to constantly worry about running out of gas? You said that you would go back pretty far to some campsites and that could prove to be a problem if you were low on gas and the stations were far apart. I keep the tank above 1/2 all the time and it’s never a problem. I do end up paying a lot for gas at times because it’s in the middle of nowhere.
      5. When you are out there do you use your bucket for going to the bathroom or just do the cat holes. And if you do use the bucket and trash bags, how do you store it till you get to a place to dispose of it? I use the 5 gallon bucket and I just store it in garbage bags. It’s almost never mores than 5-7 days before I get back to town at least for the afternoon.

  10. Calvin R says:

    This post combines beauty, inspiration, and functionality in one excellent package. I particularly liked the first picture and the Sedona/Prescott ones. The video is useful in a big way.

    I’ll join in to ask about the tent. I was startled that another commenter posted about tents being required in Florida. Any information on that front will help.

    The video was especially helpful. With that much information, I could do a much better job of visiting Quartzsite than I actually did when I was there.

    • Bob Bob says:

      Thanks Calvin. Sorry, I know nothing about camping in Florida so I can’t help you there. I carry the tent as a model for photos and to hold my space while I’m gone.
      Bob

  11. Mitchell says:

    Great idea to do the video and to include the map. Well done!

    I’ll be there next year.

  12. Jeff Johnston says:

    Thanks for the informative and well made video on Quartzite; much appreciated!

  13. Ming says:

    ah, what a great camping year you have had. Thank you for sharing the photos, they are a great inspiration to get ourselves out there!!

    Happy New Year!

  14. Walt says:

    Some great spots. I’m especially interested in the spots around Moab as I may be there with my son in early June. Are there specific areas you’d recommend? I’m particularly interested in areas that I can get a 35-foot Class A into.

    • Bob Bob says:

      Walt, there are really very few dispersed cams left around Moab, the BLM is steadily closing them. If I were going there in June I was would go up into the National Forest in the Manti LaSal mountains just southwest of Moab.

  15. Kevin says:

    Beautiful camping spots and locations. Thanks for putting things in perspective Bob. I’m Definitely stepping out of the rat race this year to finally enjoy spots like these! See you at RTR!
    Kevin recently posted…Photos of my Camps in 2015My Profile

  16. Teri Live Oak Fl says:

    Love your campsites. What’s there not to like, right. I must have missed the Steamboat Springs post.

    • Bob Bob says:

      Thanks Teri. So many other things have come up as posts I haven’t done steamboat Springs yet. There are still three more posts to come before I am done with my 2015 summer travels. By then it will be time to start my new 2016 summer travels!
      Bob

  17. tommy helms says:

    For added impact, after each campsite photo, look at a picture of the slums of Detroit, Chicago, Baltimore, Toledo, Los Angelos, etc.

  18. Steve says:

    Bob, one thing does concern me. I am a bit of a worrier, and tend to over think think things at times. But, you stated that you sometimes get creek water and run it through your filter. Do you drink that water? I know that the Platypus GravityWorks Filter System filters out some things, but it doesn’t catch and purify it against everything. It is a good filter system but I personally wouldn’t drink the water from it. Unless you can test the water source to know what is it you are taking a big chance.

    In this day and age there is NO WAY I would drink that water, even if you ran it through 5 of those filters. What you are doing is not purifying water. Only a water purification plant in a city or where ever is going to get water to a safe drinkable state,in my opinion. They are constantly testing the water and monitoring lots of different contaminants. I don’t care if you have lived next to the lake, stream, or whatever body of water for a long time, you have no way of telling what is in that water unless it is professionally tested.
    Please don’t take this the wrong way, I just don’t know how you could trust that water.
    If I am missing something here let me know. I am always open to learning new things. Maybe I’m not looking at this the right way.

    • Bob Bob says:

      Steve there is always risk in life and we are constantly forced to weigh the risk versus reward. Some people are more risk-averse than others, and no one is wrong, they just have different comfort levels with it.

      Where I go I’m pretty remote and I feel pretty confident in the filter, so I accept the very slight risk of using it.
      Bob

  19. Awesome Photography BOB ..

  20. Viviane says:

    Have you ever had problems with wild animals of any kind? I know it sounds silly, but that is the only reason i get afraid to go out alone.

    • Bob Bob says:

      Viviane, it isn’t silly at all, many people are afraid of animal attacks. The good news is that there is almost nothing to be afraid of. There are only a few areas where bears are a serious threat and it’s easy to avoid those places or to prevent the problem. The odds of being attacked by a mountain lion are so low that you can just put it out of your mind totally. The same with rattlesnakes, they are out there but the odds of you being bitten are extremely low. And if it does happen, you will probably just recover no problem.

      With reasonable caution and prevention it is a non-existent problem.
      Bob

  21. Robin C Morgan says:

    My wire and I will be leaving for AZ in Feb. from St. Louis. fb page METAPHYSICAL MEANDERINGS
    Have been camping for 50 years, now at 62 and 56′ respectfully, my wife and I are leaving in a used pop-up.
    Hope to meander and see family, but especially want to experience that awakening.
    See you on the road.
    Robin and Deb

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