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How many here are working while on the road?Seasonal,temporary or full time.When me and Vic hit the road in 1997 we worked seasonal in Mt and Wy for 3-4 months each summer.Since I started SS in2007,we have not worked other than volunteer work.We applied for jobs for the beet harvest in ND this fall.I don't know why,just looking for a new adventure I guess.
I'm debating about taking my sales job on the road with me. It's all phone calls and emails and if I apply myself I can make a tidy sum with it without a whole lot of time spent on it. OTOH, I'd like to finally be fully retired so I'm really torn about it. I have until the fall to make up my mind and arrange for suitable connectivity.

While I'm an Ontario resident there's not a whole lot of camp hosting jobs here but when I finally get to move to BC I expect that I'll try for camp hosting jobs out there since there's more placements than people apparently.

I won't be able to do camp hosting or any other job while in the US since getting work permits is about impossible when you're a Canadian.
(03-04-2015, 12:20 PM)Almost There Wrote: [ -> ]I'm debating about taking my sales job on the road with me. It's all phone calls and emails and if I apply myself I can make a tidy sum with it without a whole lot of time spent on it. OTOH, I'd like to finally be fully retired so I'm really torn about it. I have until the fall to make up my mind and arrange for suitable connectivity.

While I'm an Ontario resident there's not a whole lot of camp hosting jobs here but when I finally get to move to BC I expect that I'll try for camp hosting jobs out there since there's more placements than people apparently.

I won't be able to do camp hosting or any other job while in the US since getting work permits is about impossible when you're a Canadian.

What about the other way around? Since there are more placements than job seekers in BC, any idea how easy it would be for a US citizen to land a temp job north of the border...?
(03-04-2015, 12:45 PM)mconlonx Wrote: [ -> ]What about the other way around? Since there are more placements than job seekers in BC, any idea how easy it would be for a US citizen to land a temp job north of the border...?
Nah, same thing goes, you're welcome here as a tourist but without a work permit you're screwed and getting a temporary work permit for anything other than farm labor (harvest time) is extremely difficult. You don't want that job trust me! Canadian farmers import Mexican labor for that.

You can do volunteer work but if that has any perks like a free campsite then it's seen as an employee benefit and then you're on the payroll. That's why I can't take a US camp hosting position.

The only way to do it would be to team up with a Canadian and do 6 months each side of the border each putting the work in the name of the one with the citizenship. But you'd have a hell of a time at the border twice a year...sigh!!

Don't get me started on US and Canadian immigration policies.... Rolleyes
Don't know if I would go the camp hosting route.I don't think the pay is that great.Me and Vic worked at dude ranches mostly,with free food and housing.At the end of the summer we usually averaged about $2000 each per month,plus board.
Lot of Canuck comedians, actors and news people come down here. Do they get a special waiver? Maybe we can send The Biebs back north? Smile
(03-04-2015, 02:18 PM)LeeRevell Wrote: [ -> ]Lot of Canuck comedians, actors and news people come down here.  Do they get a special waiver?  Maybe we can send The Biebs back north?  Smile

Ahhh, yes, the entertainment industry - special rules apply. And no thank you on the Biebs.... Tongue

Both countries maintain a list of preferred professions where there are shortages. Nurses for example can get their work visa in a heartbeat. Some of the US medical groups actually host job fairs up here to attract nursing professionals. They then help them get their paperwork. Basically you have to have the job offer and then the new employer has to swear on a stack that they can't find an American to fill the job and are willing to wait while the paperwork is processed so that you can work for them. It also doesn't give you residency so you have to go through the whole thing on a regular basis. Joe or Jan Blow just looking to move across the border because they like it better - not a chance in hell.

US and Canadian immigration policies is one thing you don't want to get me started on, it's like telling me that Canadians get 'free' health care - waving a red flag in front of a bull would be kinder.... Big Grin
Let's stay on topic about working on the road.

Canadians are such fascinating creatures they deserve their own thread--just not here. [Image: tongue.gif]
Bob
I've been in the PC repair business now since 1995, live and work in the Los Angeles area, I'm really tired of the way things in this area are going. One of the reasons I'm converting my van.
My work is typically on site or via a remote connection. There are times I need my shop/workspace and that's gonna be tough in the van. I don't have a high top!.
But I'm seriously considering trimming back what I can offer. If I hang in or near the area I can do 80 % of the calls I get no problem. If I get out of the area I can do 50% or more via remote if I have a decent internet connection. For now I'm going to give it my best shot, that's the only way I know if I can continue to earn enough every month.

So with that said I'm gonna give it the old college try as they say. It will no doubt be quite a change, but then again, if I can get out of this town and enjoy some of the country it will be all worth it.
A friend of mine does pretty well doing only remote computer repairs.

I sell ebooks via Amazon.