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I'm heading out to colorado in september for a bachelor party and was hoping to stay for another week(last week of september) roaming around in my van.   So, I'm considering throwing something together.

I have an e250 cargo van and was wondering if putting 1" polyiso insulation on the roof and window cutouts would of any use against the cold at night?  Or would it be pointless?  Average temps at this time seems to be around 65 high and 25-30 low. 

I plan to have plenty of warm clothing, 0degree sleeping bag and wave 3 heater, though I hope to not run the heater much.   I'm also they type of person that would rather be a little cold than be baking away in heat, if that matters at all.

I don't plan to keep the van, just thought it might be nice to do a little "trail run" as I've been contemplating picking up a chevy extended van to modify.

Any input would be much appreciated.  Thanks!
Insulating a cargo van helps quite a bit in my book. Ever seen a bare interior rain inside from the normal moisture we put off? Happened in my first van years ago and sold me on insulating and a little venting, especially when cooking or heating.
Thanks for the reply Bindi. Does it matter that I'll only be insulating maybe half of the van?

I plan to cook outside, but will probably run the heater for a bit before I go to sleep and a little bit after I wake up.
That's a great plan! That should work just fine for you.

Remember, averages are just that, much of the time it is warmer and much of the time it is colder. Colorado in September is a crap shoot ot could be a blizzard or it could be a heat wave. You're wise to go ready for the worst, and then if it's super nice you can just enjoy it!
Bob
well both Bindi and Bob both gave great advice. a little insulation wouldn't be a bad thing. seeing how you are not planning on keeping the van I would keep it to a minimum. just make sure you have the clothing and sleeping bag to handle the extreme. better to have the gear and not need it then to not have the gear and need it. highdesertranger
Thanks Bob and HDR. I plan to keep an eye on the weather and figure worse come to worse I can head back to the front range if it looks like it might get bad.
You might be able to find a large piece of carpet taken out of someones house. often they are in good shape, people just want a different color. (I have dumpster dived behind carpet stores in my youth). Run it down one wall, across the floor and up the other. Pretty easy to pressure wash in in your driveway first. You can also get some used tall drapes or quilts from second hand stores. Put up a divider closing off the drivers area. The front and side windows will loose a lot of heat. Cardboard works pretty good for insulation. You can use white or wood glue to bond several layers together. Paint them if you like. Glue a thrift store picture to the inside. If you have large enough pieces, you can cover the walls also instead of carpet. Good duct tape should hold it in place.
(08-24-2015, 10:33 PM)DannyB1954 Wrote: [ -> ]You might be able to find a large piece of carpet taken out of someones house. often they are in good shape, people just want a different color.  (I have dumpster dived behind carpet stores in my youth). Run it down one wall, across the floor and up the other. Pretty easy to pressure wash in in your driveway first. You can also get some used tall drapes or quilts from second hand stores. Put up a divider closing off the drivers area. The front and side windows will loose a lot of heat. Cardboard works pretty good for insulation. You can use white or wood glue to bond several layers together. Paint them if you like. Glue a thrift store picture to the inside. If you have large enough pieces, you can cover the walls also instead of carpet. Good duct tape should hold it in place.

Carpet and cardboard both absorb moisture. Carpet inside a house gives it off rather well because of the volume of air in the home, not so much inside a van.

Carpet also absorbs smells, usually the bad ones... Rolleyes

Having used the 'good' duct tape, I found that it still loses it's stick factor when exposed to the heat of a van wall sitting in the sunshine for any length of time. We learned 30 odd years ago not to expect duct tape to hold anything up in a vertical position inside a van. And that was when we still thought that 'duct' tape could be used for heating ducts... Big Grin
(08-25-2015, 05:41 AM)Almost There Wrote: [ -> ]Carpet and cardboard both absorb moisture. Carpet inside a house gives it off rather well because of the volume of air in the home, not so much inside a van.

Carpet also absorbs smells, usually the bad ones... Rolleyes

Having used the 'good' duct tape, I found that it still loses it's stick factor when exposed to the heat of a van wall sitting in the sunshine for any length of time. We learned 30 odd years ago not to expect duct tape to hold anything up in a vertical position inside a van. And that was when we still thought that 'duct' tape could be used for heating ducts... Big Grin

I believe the op's intention was a temporary solution for an up coming trip. His temperatures are expected to be cold at night. They say they want to modify a different van for permanent use. My suggestions were how to get by on the cheap for the trip. I keep hearing about insulation getting wet and absorbing moisture. Don't let it rain inside of your van. Something that absorbs moisture will also let it evaporate. Under the front mats of all vans the factories put a fiber soundproofing and insulation to keep out engine heat and noise. When was the last time anyone had to pull this out to let it dry? If moisture gets under a waterproof insulation How does it dry?

I insulated a portable work shed with cardboard in the San Francisco Bay area. It was 3 sided with a roof, so you could put it up to the machinery with a forklift and work on it. When I was not using it, that side was exposed to the environment. It worked well for years. May still be working, (I retired).
the factory insulation they put on the floor of vehicles does not dry itself out. once it gets wet you must remove it to air dry it. it will not dry out on its own. this is if you are lucky enough to get it out in one piece. if the insulation is soaked and you try to remove it most of the time it just falls apart. highdesertranger
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