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Me and my wife were called to my hometown last week. We were told that my sister(my only sibling) had died in a car accident. Her child wasn't in the car at the time when it happen. Anyways they want me to adopt the little girl. My wife says yes but travel with her with the extra money we make. How do you raise a child on a RV?
(10-09-2015, 08:59 PM)Clyson Wrote: [ -> ]How do you raise a child on a RV?
Home school!
Your travels can be incorporated as part--a major part probably--of the education.
I haven't checked, I understand many states have home school programs. When I did it with my two, the state mailed materials to our locations. We mailed completed lessons back to the state--they paid the postage--and a teacher graded the work.

At the time, we had to keep moving to stay in the program, or return home, where we could stay in. If we settled out of state they would stop.
If you want, I'll give you the name of the absolute best math program I EVER came across. (I used to teach 2nd graders). Not used in many schools and takes a bit of teacher learning and trust--it is the best ever, hands down.
One word of caution re homeschooling on the road is that the child will lose the social aspect of school. This is critical for child development. If one were homeschooling in one location they could still get peer interaction with sports teams, boy scouts etc. Not so on the road.

They say that the ability to get along with others and be social is more important for employment than intelligence.
(10-09-2015, 09:38 PM)OElla1 Wrote: [ -> ]Home school!
Your travels can be incorporated as part--a major part probably--of the education.
I haven't checked, I understand many states have home school programs. When I did it with my two, the state mailed materials to our locations. We mailed completed lessons back to the state--they paid the postage--and a teacher graded the work.

At the time, we had to keep moving to stay in the program, or return home, where we could stay in. If we settled out of state they would stop.
If you want, I'll give you the name of the absolute best math program I EVER came across. (I used to teach 2nd graders). Not used in many schools and takes a bit of teacher learning and trust--it is the best ever, hands down.
Thanks! I would love a link to that program
(10-09-2015, 10:20 PM)One Awesome Inch Wrote: [ -> ]One word of caution re homeschooling on the road is that the child will lose the social aspect of school. This is critical for child development. If one were homeschooling in one location they could still get peer interaction with sports teams, boy scouts etc. Not so on the road.

They say that the ability to get along with others and be social is more important for employment than intelligence.
Thanks true. My wife said the same thing. Do you have any suggestions how we can improve her social skills?
I'm an advocate of the mobile life to everyone I meet. Except people with kids. I just don't think that's fair to them to be brought up that way without a choice. I've often said to friends that the only time I could imagine giving up this life is the day I have kids.

Of course, the other side of the coin is that this may be better for her than foster care etc.

If you are going to consider this, then give her a choice. Have a conversation with her and explain both options. People give kids far too little credit in terms of talking down to them and making decisions for them. And she'll learn a sense of ownership from her decision without being able to fault anyone else.

That's assuming she's old enough to have a conversation of any sort.
That may be true of some, but not all.
google success of homeschooling   here's one link
http://www.brighthubeducation.com/homesc...schooling/
Both of my girls went into non traditional careers. The older got a 5 year scholarship for books, fees, tuition to a US school of her choice. Her school of choice changed their program for her. She also got a couple of other scholarships that helped with her other needs--food & clothing. She graduated with 2 degrees, with honors, had jobs after her first semester, and did community service/outreach while a student. She got her masters degree a couple of years later.
The second one was in the first class that was coed in her school. She also graduated with two degrees, and recently completed her masters degree.
They did well, and are doing well. Smile
As we were traveling, granted not for a l-o-n-g time, my kids totally enjoyed it. They would rather have continued on the road, but we did settle in a place.
(10-09-2015, 10:42 PM)TMG51 Wrote: [ -> ]I'm an advocate of the mobile life to everyone I meet. Except people with kids. I just don't think that's fair to them to be brought up that way without a choice. I've often said to friends that the only time I could imagine giving up this life is the day I have kids.

Of course, the other side of the coin is that this may be better for her than foster care etc.

If you are going to consider this, then give her a choice. Have a conversation with her and explain both options. People give kids far too little credit in terms of talking down to them and making decisions for them. And she'll learn a sense of ownership from her decision without being able to fault anyone else.

That's assuming she's old enough to have a conversation of any sort.
I will have a talk with her later this weekend. I'll make sure I don't influence her choice. I just don't want her to be raised in a orphanage and foster homes for the rest of her child and teenage years. Many foster parents do it for the extra money. Of course I would love for my nephew to be adopted to a loving and caring family, but at the same time I want her to experience something new. We must make a choice by the 23 of October.
I started home schooling mine when they would have started school BECAUSE of what they would have faced in the schools. I didn't want them facing that at that age.
As far as socializing with other children their age, opportunities will possibly be available at various venues, via kids programs. Of course they are not on-going, but that's not a problem at that age. If you decide to stay in one place for more than a few weeks, enroll her, if you want, in a child care program. Home schoolers here have/had a Friday meeting at the local park for age appropriate sports and games, arts, other socializing.
It was not a problem for my kids, and I would bet other HS parents would agree.
Not a program, that was an incorrect word. Two books, one for pre-school and kindergarden
and one for 1&2
It is not a book for the child. It's a teacher's manual, remember. The child doesn't have a book in this program. You use the book to guide the child through activities requiring manipulatives and recording sheets. Through using this book, the kids understand and learn by doing, later writing it down.
My students saw it as playing, when in fact they were hard at learning the whys.


Mathematics Their Way: An Activity-Centered Mathematics Program for Early Childhood Education Spiral-bound – 1995  by Mary Baratta-Lorton
http://www.amazon.com/Mathematics-Their-Way-Activity-Centered-Childhood/dp/020186150X/ref=pd_sim_14_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1MD24H0ZKB17B8024SCH&dpID=51q1jVAfJgL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR125%2C160_

Mathematics... A Way of Thinking
http://www.amazon.com/dp/020104322X/?tag=mh0b-20&hvadid=4163836330&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_3okxd5fqke_e
Do read all the reviews.

It requires adult preparation: read the lesson and follow it--it guides you through. Most of the manipulatives we used were free, or very inexpensive and easy to get. One thing I did get from a store was mis-cut keys from the hardware store.
My 2nd graders LOVED math with this way of learning. I loved it.
I can't say enough for it. I will say again, the adult reads the manual and follows it pretty closely/exactly. It is astounding.

off my soap box now... Big Grin
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