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"...you know what happens when you assume."

Instead of the standard line, I always tell people, "It makes an ass of 'u' in front of 'me.'" The way I see it, them assuming something certainly doesn't make an ass of me. (That is, UNTIL I point out the stupidity of their assumption. But we won't count that.)
Truthfully, I got so sick of hearing that line that for years now, I use the word presume instead of assume.  I'm sure it frustrates the hell out of people who are in love with that line. Tongue

Regards
John
Then there's the ever fun "There's no I in team!".

(10-11-2015, 04:26 AM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: [ -> ]Truthfully, I got so sick of hearing that line that for years now, I use the word presume instead of assume.  I'm sure it frustrates the hell out of people who are in love with that line. Tongue

Regards
John

These words are used interchangeably in 'common' language, however, technically they have a different meaning.
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/...or-presume

Guy
(10-11-2015, 01:33 PM)gsfish Wrote: [ -> ]These words are used interchangeably in 'common' language, however, technically they have a different meaning.
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/...or-presume

Guy
However, if you have read Blink, by Malcolm Gladwell, then you know a lot of the time people are presuming when even they, themselves, think they are assuming. We make a lot of suppositions based on probability using our internal dataset built up over a lifetime of experience. Sure, we can't offer proof, in the form of numbers and statistics. But, then again, when experts presume someone dead, they didn't actually calculate that either. They just go on past experience. These people just have a larger, hopefully less biased internal dataset. It's like when Kirk told Spock, in The Journey Home, "I'll take your guess over someone else's calculation any day."
(10-11-2015, 01:33 PM)gsfish Wrote: [ -> ]These words are used interchangeably in 'common' language, however, technically they have a different meaning.
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/...or-presume

Guy

English is a fascinating language.  Take your basic German - courtesy of the Angles and Saxons - and add healthy amounts of Celtic, courtesy of the original Britons, Latin, courtesy of the Romans, Old Norse, courtesy of the Danes, and old French, courtesy of the Normans.  Mix well and let simmer for several hundred years.

I love the fact that flammable and inflammable mean exactly the same thing.

Regards
John
As these days, so do.....
Cool and Hot
Good and Bad
Cool
(10-11-2015, 02:20 PM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: [ -> ]I love the fact that flammable and inflammable mean exactly the same thing.

Yeah, chats one of my favorites too.

And when was the last time anyone ever "raveled" a sweater.
(10-11-2015, 05:17 PM)GrantRobertson Wrote: [ -> ]Yeah, chats one of my favorites too.

Dang, I hate autocorrect. It seems to have gotten worse with this latest update of Android.
(10-11-2015, 11:27 AM)sephson Wrote: [ -> ]Then there's the ever fun "There's no I in team!".


but there is a m and e
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