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Hey guys, I'm about to hit the road again, and I've finally wised up and decided its time to start traveling with a  spare. 

I have a 96 dodge ram van B2500 5.9. Any recommendations on an easy to install and affordable rear door mount? And while I'm at it, any recommendations for a 2 bike rack for the rear hitch?

Thanks brothas and sistas!
What is affordable for some is exorbitant to others Tongue

I installed a front receiver hitch and a spare tire carrier to hold the spare on the front of the vehicle and get some of the weight off the back end.  Like these:

http://www.realtruck.com/curt-front-moun...790MA.html

http://www.carid.com/curt/spare-tire-mou...Agrb8P8HAQ

This would give you all the room you need on the back for lightweight bike's and have a great "crush zone" on the front.
^^ This and from past experience with rear door mounted spare tire carriers, all I can say is don't do it unless you have no other choice.

From my earliest 61 Ford Econoline up through three generations all had rear tire carriers until the manufacturers started the below frame tire carrier system.

All suffered from door hinge sag within a few years. The hinges were never meant to carry the weight of a spare tire. That and the mounting on the door edge opposite the hinge used to rust sooner than later.

If you do absolutely have to mount the tire there, at least put it on the left door and open it as seldom as possible, the passenger side door being the first one to be opened. That will save the hinges somewhat.
(11-12-2015, 02:43 PM)Almost There Wrote: [ -> ]^^ This and from past experience with rear door mounted spare tire carriers, all I can say is don't do it unless you have no other choice.

From my earliest 61 Ford Econoline up through three generations all had rear tire carriers until the manufacturers started the below frame tire carrier system.

All suffered from door hinge sag within a few years. The hinges were never meant to carry the weight of a spare tire. That and the mounting on the door edge opposite the hinge used to rust sooner than later.

If you do absolutely have to mount the tire there, at least put it on the left door and open it as seldom as possible, the passenger side door being the first one to be opened. That will save the hinges somewhat.

X2.  They are also great at breaking the taillight lens if the door is not restrained.
(11-12-2015, 03:00 PM)B and C Wrote: [ -> ]X2.  They are also great at breaking the taillight lens if the door is not restrained.


Oh yea, forgot about that! I think I had a favorite wrecking yard on speed dial!!

The vinyl covers were a little more forgiving than the continental kits... Rolleyes
On my Ford E 350 I've mounted mine on the left rear door where  the top of the tire is about 8 inches  above the bottom of the door's window. (obstructing the view just slightly)   These is a big & heavy R16" 235X85 series tire and an effort for me to mount and dismount if needed.   For a Women,  I'd suggest just trying to find room
under your bed laying flat on the floor as a carry palace for it.  

One issue I've ran into with the rear door mounted spare tire is my license plate mounts on the door on this vehicle.  That's where the license plate lighting is set up.  With the spare mounted on the door I had to get a
thin piece of aluminum sheet the width of the license plate and about the width of it and  make like a second
license plate to bolt the actual license plate to the aluminum and the top of that aluminum to the holes the
license plate originally was fastened into.  This bit of extension got the license below the spare where it could be seen and be legal,  while the lighting was still able to illuminate it after dark.  I guess a person could take an old license plate and turn it around backwards and spray paint it to match the color of your Van and use it the same way.
Thanks Brian.

I wouldn't have thought of a front mount but it does seem like it solves some of the problems with a rear door mount.

I carried the spare to the dodge inside with me and it took up more space than I liked.

Nancy
(12-07-2015, 10:27 AM)towhee Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks Brian.

I wouldn't have thought of a front mount but it does seem like it solves some of the problems with a rear door mount.

I carried the spare to the dodge inside with me and it took up more space than I liked.

Nancy

Yeah, mine came inside one of the outside storage compartments and it does take up a LOT of useful storage space.  Since I am towing a vehicle, a rear hitch mount wasn't going to work and if there are van doos involved it would always be in the way even with one of those things to lower it easily.  As a side benefit, it is a great extended front bumper Tongue  and another point to be towed from if stuck.

I am not sure if there are any front hitch receivers for your particular receiver though  Huh  A quick search turned up 0 results.  If you know a welder/fabricator, they should be able to take care of you.
I've a rear drivers side door mounted spare tire carrier that came with the van.

It certainly is possible to wipe out the tailight lens if one removes the restraint.  That door can only open so far with the tire on.  Sometimes an issue, but mostly not, for me anyway.

I once mounted two full size spares on it on a long trip deep in Baja, But I used some strain relief  to the roofrack to take some of the weight off of the carrier and twice needed both spares far from civilization, so I was glad to have them.

  A lower hinge pin sheared  a few years later and I took another year or longer for me  to actually repair it.   The single upper hinge was holding the entire door on for at least a year.  I'd run some thinner rope around it  with some cedar wedges in between rope and hinge to at least try and keep it from pulling out when i opened the door

Replacing this pin required a machine shop  My 10 ton puller was no match.  The machine shop gave up too and drilled it out.  I should have just gotten junkyard hinges, which I did later, for my side doors whose brass bushings were well worn.

I've got slightly oversized tires, 30x9.5x15 compared to the original 235/75/15's.  IF these tires were any bigger, I'd have to modify the carrier's bolts moving the tire further from Van body to allow the other door to close past the tire.  I could easily see it being far too difficult to lift a large tire/rim combo and slide it over the studs, for a smaller or older person.  Especially if a 1 ton Van with 16 inch rms and E rated tires which might be 80 Lbs or more.

I've taken off  the carrier more than once, to treat the rust and repaint it. Rustoleum preventing rust, my ass. It now has Stainless steel fasteners, and a marine yacht  enamel paint and remains mostly rust free.

I keep a tire cover over the full size matching  spare, but had to modify it with some grommets and rope to stay tight and in place.

I regularly stand on my Spare tire  mounted on my Door, when squeeging the Solar panels.  I weigh almost 220lbs. Door sag is not an issue with my dodge.  When the door is closed much of the weight is not on the hinges.

I'd say look to a junkyard, and find one on the same make/similar year as your Van for the easiest direct bolt up.  I used some old neoprene from a wetsuit to protect the paint on the hinges from the part of the carrier which slides over the hinges  One can bend the hook out slightly so it does not shear off the paint sliding and expanding over the hinge.  Do not cross thread the bolt if one expands this hook.

The Dodge hinges , at least upto 1994 are seriously beefy and the tire rack is hardly overstressing them, the hinge Pins can shear, the brass bushings can elongate, but the actual metal of the hinge is nearly 7/16" thick.  Don;t know about ford or Chevy or anything new.

No way would I sacrifice interior space to carry a spare.  The rear door mounting is hardly ideal, But is the best option, for me.  I once helped someone unload their spare from atop their van, and nearly hurt myself doing so, pretty much dropping the tire to save my back, luckily it bounced favorably.

  My passenger side rear door has the ladder.  This too can and has damaged a taillight lens when I removed the restraint  I fiberglassed it and left it for 10 years.  My taillight lenses had eventually deteriorated to the strength of a nacho chip.  Thankfully RockAuto has inexpensive replacements. but they required some fine tuning of the edges to mate nicely

I'd fear a front mounted tire carrier blocking radiator airflow, but many vehicles seem to have them without issue.

The rear door mounted carrier  can partially obscure one brake light and totally so from extreme angles.  Since the brake and turn signal are one and the same on many American Vans, basically when braking, and signalling, one only has one brake light which is often way too dim from an aged bulb, cloudy lens and a oxidized reflector.

With the preponderance of self important and highly deluded texting instagram checking drivers, obscuring a brakelight even partially could perhaps contribute/ lead to an accident.  I recently added a 3rd brake light which is LED and comes to full brightness instantly, whereas incandescent 1157 bulbs common in Van taillights take much longer to illuminate to full brightness.  I had to run a dedicated wire to the brake light switch for this 3rd brake light.  Tapping any nearby wire would have the 3rd brake light come on with either turn signal.

I am glad my liscence plate is not incorporated into the spare tire carrier.  Not sure how these designs incorporate the wiring for the mandatory LP light