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THIS IS THE PERFECT U.S. ROAD TRIP ACCORDING TO SCIENTISTS

http://www.thebolditalic.com/articles/70...scientists 

The mapcreated by Randy Olson with help from Tracy Staedter, pinpoints a mix of 50 major national landmarks, national historic sites, national parks, and national monuments. If you follow the route suggested, you’ll travel across all 48 contiguous states and never leave the country. Take a look for yourself below.

And don’t even think about shortcutting or not following the map. Olson used a genetic algorithm that found the best routes with little backtracking. The result is a map using “true distance,” which is the “shortest route by road between every landmark.” You should probably take Olson's word over anyone else's, considering he's a fourth-year graduate research assistant at Michigan State University.

If you’re more into seeing cities than, say, Mount Rushmore, Olson also created a similar map that prioritizes TripAdvisor’s most recommended metros. 
Far from it.  It skips things like The California Redwoods, Highway 1, Quartzite.  Nothing of the entire West Coast coast with the exception of SF.

It was written by someone who has obviously never been on a roadtrip.  (You should probably take Olson's word over anyone else's, considering he's a fourth-year graduate research assistant at Michigan State University.)   Dodgy  Book learning is not a replacement for hard experience.  

The perfect road trip is one where nothing breaks down.    Big Grin  You take your time, and meet interesting people.

I spent many years studying, but also many more years doing. I have uncounted miles traveled~~~ I prefer the doing and traveling to the studying.
GotSmart, when will you learn? Just do everything you're told, especially by someone "edumacated", and you will be much more docile and easily manipulated.
(12-01-2015, 08:33 AM)im so glad you said this -- i assumed it was not "perfect" and that real vandwellers would be far better experts. 

GotSmart Wrote: [ -> ]
Far from it.  It skips things like The California Redwoods, Highway 1, Quartzite.  Nothing of the entire West Coast coast with the exception of SF.
The perfect road trip is one where nothing breaks down.    Big Grin  You take your time, and meet interesting people.
I agree with GotSmart. A real road trip doesn't look anything like Olson's map. His city map isn't much better. He skipped some of the best cities including a favorite of mine - St Louis, Missouri which is a great city for van dwellers because it has many free attractions and lots of options for free overnight spots.

Thanks for posting the link though. It is an interesting concept. :-)
(12-01-2015, 10:01 AM)buckwilk Wrote: [ -> ]GotSmart, when will you learn? Just do everything you're told, especially by someone "edumacated", and you will be much more docile and easily manipulated.

ERRR...   I done be edgumakatered, n I gots a deplomee to proves it!  I was de most onry kid en de klass!   Cool  

Nothing gave me greater pleasure than to prove the failings of a so called expert.  I had professors that would specifically tell me not to answer as they wanted the other students to dig their own graves.   Tongue  It was a lot of fun being the oldest student in 98%  of my classes. 

If someone wants the perfect road trip,  Good luck.  

If you want a great adventure, ask Tony & Karen, Bindy & us, or any number of members on here.  You will never get a "One size fits all" answer.
Asking "scientists" to design the perfect road trip is like asking lawyers to design the perfect health regimen for you.  What the hell would either of them know about it?

Now, if I wanted an outsider to design the perfect, no time limit, road trip, I'd ask the Smithsonian to do it.

Regards
John
Allow me to propose an alternative:

1. Flip a coin. Heads is east/west and tails is north/south. Flip the coin a second time to determine the actual travel direction.

2. Avoid all interstate highways and toll roads.

3. Do not use any tourbooks.

4. Do not eat in any restaurants that are part of a chain franchise.

5. Ask a diner waitress what is the most fun thing to do in that area. If her suggestion also sounds fun to you, invite her to come along. [Note: you will know if this is a bad idea from her hairstyle.]

6. Avoid any motel that is part of a chain franchise, but skip others that have SUVs in the parking lot with really, really nice hubcaps.

7. To find the best place to go on a Saturday night, ask people in a laundromat (start with any who are pregnant).

8. Buy a souvenir in every bowling alley you see.

9. Always check out museums at Indian casinos.

10. Each time you stop for gas, repeat step one. If you keep this up, you'll eventually hit all 48 states.

I’m sure others here can add to the list.


Damian
Ha, ha Damian I like your list! Have you actually done this? It must have led to some interesting experiences.
(12-03-2015, 10:15 PM)**** warning: i\m having trouble writing in this forum as it keeps reverting to bold and sometimes removes a part of my message -- sorry. it may be my browser acting up (opera). i would agree, damian,  with your step 2 as fuel is the same as rent and the quicker and faster you go, the more it costs you per week. also, major highways make one miss so much, and are only useful for free overnight stays in the carparks of roadhouses (what we call major servos in remote areas of australia). i lived in a toyota coaster bus (converted by us to camping) with my partner and 2 young kids, back in the mid 80s. we left from perth, along the southwest coast, to adelaide, then to alice springs, up to darwin, then through the kimberley (the bus floating away on a flooded road), to broom, along the west coast and back to perth. it took us 1 year, and the kids were schooled by correspondence. we took the slow scenic routes as much as possible. it was a great trip and cost us very little (almost never staying in caravan parks). we met so many interesting people (including japanese students at a youth hostel who taught the kids origami), saw dinosaur footprints near broom, played with wild dolphins at monkey mia. a few years later (with an extra kid - a baby) i drove across the usa from vancouver, portland, california coast, disneyland, grand canyon, st louis (seeing my sister's new 'tara' mansion), then to baltimore and ocean city. we were in an old buick stationwagon i bought in portland (called a 'boat') and stayed at the cheapest motels we could find (the baby slept in her sheepskin stroller inside the closet while we ate and watched tv weather reports). it was a great adventure. took route 66 ("kooky, kooky, lend me your comb") as much as possible.  but my first major road trip was in the mid 70s, from baltimore to florida, then to texas (driving a VW Thing through the snow) and then mexico, hitchhiking most of the way with 2 other aussie women. we used a big sign we made showing a huge kangaroo holding out a thumb -- very effective as some people drove back to pick us up!  (the movie 'crocodile dundee' was very popular at the time.) since all my experiences are so long ago, i wonder if road travel is as much fun today as back then. cheers, ginger Wrote: [ -> ]Allow me to propose an alternative:

1. Flip a coin. Heads is east/west and tails is north/south. Flip the coin a second time to determine the actual travel direction.

2. Avoid all interstate highways and toll roads.

3. Do not use any tourbooks.

[snip]

I’m sure others here can add to the list.


Damian
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