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http://graphics.latimes.com/retirement-n...tification


Saw this in a retirement forum...If it should be moved, go ahead...
(01-30-2016, 01:16 PM)Wanderer Wrote: [ -> ]http://graphics.latimes.com/retirement-n...tification


Saw this in a retirement forum...If it should be moved, go ahead...

This is why some of us are judgemental instead of indiscriminately accepting and supportive of everyone wth half baked ideas that comes onto the forum. But for a couple of very lucky breaks, over which we had no control, these people could be DH and me. Don't think that we do not know that.
Good story and a gutsy lady.  Wishing the best for her.
I want to live life as much as I can, before I don't have any. 


That sums it up.
Thank you for sharing this.
Eeks.

To be fair, there is a time and a place to spend your last dime on a quality sit-down meal. The blogger "Mobile Homemaker" mentions this in her post "Controlling Desperation":

"If you cannot think of what to do, if you believe that all hope has gone, if you are tired of trying, then pause. Breathe deeply. Do you have any money at all? If you do, spend it on a good meal, even if you are spending every dime. Get a good meal, and sit in a warm place eating it, with friendly people serving it. Eat and enjoy, and think about good things. ... There is nothing so painful as desperation. Nothing so counterproductive. Now that you are feeling good again, nothing has changed, except you. You are different. Now you can think. ... Try to identify your most pressing problems individually, and find a straight line to a solution."


My therapist, who uses an EcoTherapy model focused on resetting the central nervous system naturally, also emphasizes how important it is to 'lean into' small pleasures, and eating especially is one that has a profound effect on the nervous system if it is food you enjoy. Because of this, I sometimes choose to spend more on a gourmet meal and then skip a few to even out the budget. I find this is the most mentally stabilizing for me. I know it doesn't seem to make sense initially, but when it prevents panic attacks that tend to cost even more then a twisted but sensical logic appears.

I don't know if that's the case here, all I'm saying is that's been my experience and apparently the experience of at least a couple others.

That said, it's hard to make excuses for the fact that she makes so much more than me and still sunk herself into deep debt. When I make a decision to splurge for the sake of my overall mental health, it's with the understanding the I will be sacrificing in another area to keep the zeros adding up. Often it's some other essential that gets its corners cut, such as physical health, so there's always a balancing act happening over which essentials are highest priority at that time. I'm not seeing evidence that she's actively serious about living within her means, and that bothers me.

Also, yeah, can't afford tickets. So don't speed! My boyfriend got ticketed for not stopping fully at a red light before making a right-hand turn. Cars behind me get annoyed sometimes when I never go more than 5 above the speed limit or make sure to stop fully at red lights even at right hand turns. It's because I freakin' can't afford to pay a ticket, so I'm a little extra cautious. I got ticketed once when my van's master brake cylinder went out and I all but crash landed in a 15 minute parking spot. Stayed there a lot longer than 15 minutes waiting for 5 lanes of traffic to die down enough to semi-safely cross the street to a mechanic's. The ticket massively upset me, but I sent in a letter of explanation, my apologies, and a copy of the mechanic's receipt backing up my story, and never had to pay it.
There are actually THREE stories here.  In the second one, about Mark and Denise Fuller, they mention that he has a military pension of $2700 a month.

Is there anyone here who couldn't live comfortably on $2700 a month?

The one fact tying all three examples together is that they ALL have huge debt they are trying to cope with.

A cautionary tale, indeed.

Regards
John
Agree with Optimistic Paranoid. I am also wondering how she got $50,000 in credit card debt. Also, for the cost of her lunch, I can make at least 4 healthy meals for a family of 3 adults and even more if financially pressed. I have been at the point of reading my electric meter everyday as I computed how much we could afford each day, and in the evening, whether we had the lights on and tv depended on where we were for the day on affording the electrical power that day.

I have never wasted my time thinking about what I "deserve" but working with what I could afford. That goes a long way in keeping one out of debt.

It was over 30 years ago that I read that electric meter everyday. I would have to admit having went without things made me financially smart and endlessly frugal despite what income came into the household.

This woman would have the choice to move into low income housing and get financial support in the way of public assistance, so she is making a choice. We all don't have endless choices to choose from so we work with what we have and get on with it or whine to someone and feel sorry for ourselves.

Something tells me that this woman is actually enjoying the moving around and having the jobs that she has and that a news person decided to exploit her situation. I have seen several stories like this that were negative toward the RV lifestyle. Most of the people failing in the RV lifestyle were failing in the stick/bricks lifestyle and just took their problems along with them. A lifestyle change is more than just moving from a fixed resident to a mobile one.
(01-31-2016, 08:16 AM)Snow Gypsy Wrote: [ -> ]Agree with Optimistic Paranoid.  I am also wondering how she got $50,000 in credit card debt.  Also, for the cost of her lunch, I can make at least 4 healthy meals for a family of 3 adults and even more if financially pressed.  I have been at the point of reading my electric meter everyday as I computed how much we could afford each day, and in the evening, whether we had the lights on and tv depended on where we were for the day on affording the electrical power that day.

I have never wasted my time thinking about what I "deserve" but working with what I could afford.  That goes a long way in keeping one out of debt.

It was over 30 years ago that I read that electric meter everyday.  I would have to admit having went without things made me financially smart and endlessly frugal despite what income came into the household.

This woman would have the choice to move into low income housing and get financial support in the way of public assistance, so she is making a choice.  We all don't have endless choices to choose from so we work with what we have and get on with it or whine to someone and feel sorry for ourselves.

Something tells me that this woman is actually enjoying the moving around and having the jobs that she has and that a news person decided to exploit her situation.  I have seen several stories like this that were negative toward the RV lifestyle.  Most of the people failing in the RV lifestyle were failing in the stick/bricks lifestyle and just took their problems along with them.  A lifestyle change is more than just moving from a fixed resident to a mobile one.

I don't understand the debt, either. How did she even get anyone to give her that much credit? We moved into retirement with no debt. But I do know people our age who are still paying off cars and 2nd\3rd mortgages. That is just baffling.
A couple of other interesting things I saw in the article:

Regarding the second couple, it said that "Mark has started taking classes to become an on the road rig repairman and inspector known as an RV Doctor."

Out of curiosity, I Googled "RV Doctor Classes" and found this site:

https://rvtechcourse.com/

There may be other, similar courses available, and possibly these would be of interest to some of the people here.

Finally, in the third and final segment the couple:  "Months later, they bought a diesel truck at an auction.  Then it's engine blew.  Cost:  $18,000."

I've said it before, and I'll say it again:  do not, Do Not, DO NOT buy a diesel pickup truck.  The modern ones are expensive disasters waiting to happen!

Regards
John
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