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I have been doing some research on how State Parks define what is an acceptable camping rig, since I am going to be using an unusual camping rig. I have checked out some, and sometimes the wording is vague on what they deem to be a camping rig. I am not going to be staying for any extended times. Just an overnight or few days at the most, on road trips.

Florida for example defines a camping rig as:

"Camping Rigs
A camping rig is defined as combinations of vehicles, trailers, tents and/or hammocks. Pedestrians without a camping rig will not be allowed to stay. While most campsites can accommodate a variety of camping rigs, some campsites may not accommodate large trailers or RVs having both large slide-outs and a dining fly. Be sure to indicate specifications when making a reservation. Setting up in buffer zones or other use areas that interfere with neighboring campers is not allowed.

Hammock camping rigs and any other associated lines may be attached to trees that are minimum of 12 inches in diameter measured at chest height and using a minimum of 1-inch wide flat web straps. Some parks may provide hammock posts instead of trees."
https://www.floridastateparks.org/conten...mping_Rigs


Whereas Texas defines it as:

"Camping: The act of:
(A) occupying a designated camping facility;
(B) erecting a tent, or arranging bedding, or both, for the purpose of, or in such a manner as will permit, remaining overnight; and/or
© using a trailer, camper, or other vehicle for the purpose of sleeping during nighttime hours.
http://tpwd.texas.gov/spdest/parkinfo/ru...gulations/


 I would be setting up a Ford Escape with the seats laid down flat with an air mattress and bedding (pillow, blankey, etc). I am pretty sure I would fit the Texas definition. But I am unsure about Florida. The words "combinations of vehicles, trailers, tents and/or hammocks." could be defined in different ways I think. I could just put a small tent in the vehicle and be legal, but I wouldn't be setting it up unless absolutely necessary. Space is of a premium in this type of setup, and even though it doesn't take up much space, I don't want to carry something I am not going to use on a regular basis.
Any suggestions, or out looks on this would be helpful to me.
Buy a crap 5 dollar tent.  Set it up outside and say you will be sleeping in that.   Sleep in vehicle and laugh all the way through the night at how clever you are.

Edit:  Since you will be in a smaller vehicle you can store stuff in it to give you more room to move around.
"as combinations of vehicles, trailers, tents and/or hammocks"

If you have any ONE of these you qualify. That's how the sentence is organized.
(02-01-2016, 04:48 PM)Stevesway Wrote: [ -> ]I have been doing some research on how State Parks define what is an acceptable camping rig, since I am going to be using an unusual camping rig. I have checked out some, and sometimes the wording is vague on what they deem to be a camping rig. I am not going to be staying for any extended times. Just an overnight or few days at the most, on road trips.

Florida for example defines a camping rig as:

"Camping Rigs
A camping rig is defined as combinations of vehicles, trailers, tents and/or hammocks. Pedestrians without a camping rig will not be allowed to stay. While most campsites can accommodate a variety of camping rigs, some campsites may not accommodate large trailers or RVs having both large slide-outs and a dining fly. Be sure to indicate specifications when making a reservation. Setting up in buffer zones or other use areas that interfere with neighboring campers is not allowed.

Hammock camping rigs and any other associated lines may be attached to trees that are minimum of 12 inches in diameter measured at chest height and using a minimum of 1-inch wide flat web straps. Some parks may provide hammock posts instead of trees."
https://www.floridastateparks.org/conten...mping_Rigs


Whereas Texas defines it as:

"Camping: The act of:
(A) occupying a designated camping facility;
(B) erecting a tent, or arranging bedding, or both, for the purpose of, or in such a manner as will permit, remaining overnight; and/or
© using a trailer, camper, or other vehicle for the purpose of sleeping during nighttime hours.
http://tpwd.texas.gov/spdest/parkinfo/ru...gulations/


 I would be setting up a Ford Escape with the seats laid down flat with an air mattress and bedding (pillow, blankey, etc). I am pretty sure I would fit the Texas definition. But I am unsure about Florida. The words "combinations of vehicles, trailers, tents and/or hammocks." could be defined in different ways I think. I could just put a small tent in the vehicle and be legal, but I wouldn't be setting it up unless absolutely necessary. Space is of a premium in this type of setup, and even though it doesn't take up much space, I don't want to carry something I am not going to use on a regular basis.
Any suggestions, or out looks on this would be helpful to me.
greetings,  even though i have a pop up tent trailer i also carry a 3 person dome tent in the cab of my truck. the box is about 6in on all sides  and 2&1/2ft long i think if space was a serious issue i could fold the tent flat and fit it on top of a tote or box while traveling and store the poles/anchors  in another spot.  i hope this helps.  happy trails, texas jaybird & queenie
These rules are written so that the powers that be have something to fall back on in the event that a livestock hauler pulls in and wants to "camp". Don't worry about it, chances are no one will care where you sleep.
I called one of the State parks in Florida (Kissimmee State Park) and asked them what the rig definition was. And he said that anything you use to sleep in is acceptable in all the state parks in Florida. They don't care what you use, car, van, suv, tent, rv. What they are concerned with is that you don't have more than one camping vehicle or rig plugged into the electric at the site. So, your combination is for limiting the amount of vehicles at a site. Example..... you can have 1 car, 1 car with a tent, or 1 car towing a trailer, etc. And you are only allowed to have one of those camping rigs set up at your site.
Thanks to everyone for your help.