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[attachment=6460]

This is the bed I recently made. The idea came from a forum member. Thanks Off Grid 24/7.

It is twin-size (39" x 75") and the legs are 19" so I can store tall things under it. It is very light. I am not strong and I can easily carry it over one shoulder. I would estimate that it weighs less than 35 pounds. The legs come right off making it even easier to move.

It is made using:

1" EMT electrical conduit. My cost from Home Depot was $6.50 for a 10 foot piece x 3.
1" canopy fittings. My cost from tarps.com was $5.50 for flat roof corner x 4 (be sure to get flat NOT pitched) and $4.50 for tee x 2
1/4" manila rope. My cost from Home Depot was $6.50 for 50' x 2.

Total cost about $65.00. You could save money by using 1" PVC fittings. I didn't go that way because the conduit doesn't fit snugly in them. The canopy fittings have eye screws to tighten against the conduit. You could save money by buying 3/16" plastic rope.

Wrapping the rope was tricky. I had several false starts. Some suggestions: place the loops closest to the corners very close to the corners; try to find a 100' coil of rope so you don't have a knot and try to figure out a good knot to tie the ends to the frame so that you can pull them good and taut and that won't slip. I'm not good at knots so if anyone has a suggestion I'd appreciate it.

I have a separate post inquiring what to use as a mattress.
that's cool. we are going to need a follow up report, after you have used it. highdesertranger
(03-12-2016, 10:14 AM)highdesertranger Wrote: [ -> ]that's cool.  we are going to need a follow up report,  after you have used it.  highdesertranger


I have slept in it for two nights.

The rope has stretched and needs to be tightened. One way to deal with that is to put an adjustment bar toward the end. Here is a pic of that

[Image: rope-beds-take-2.html]

http://noxlady.blogspot.com/2010/03/rope...ake-2.html

I didn't do that because I didn't have anything to use, but I may add it if the rope continues to stretch. But it will always sag a bit.

I was concerned that the conduit rails would get pulled together and bent. I just measured and they haven't but they might for a heavy person. They may flex while you're on the bed which would contribute to the sag.
Nice!  Depending on what type/construction of rope used stretching will be different.  Also, webbing would be a good choice.  I really like it.
A couple of comments:

There was a time when ALL beds used ropes to support the mattress.  That's where the phrase "sleep tight" comes from.

I would have used parachute cord - breaking strength 550 lbs and it comes in 100 foot lengths.  I would have gotten two, and run one across the bed and the other lengthwise, interweaving the lengthwise one over and under each alternate crosswise rope.

Finally to keep it tight, I would have gotten four turnbuckles, like these:

http://www.amazon.com/RadioShack-Guy-Wire-Turnbuckles-2-Pack/dp/B007Z7KRNG/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1457805772&sr=8-8&keywords=turnbuckle

One on each end of each rope.

Regards
John
(03-12-2016, 12:10 PM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: [ -> ]A couple of comments:

There was a time when ALL beds used ropes to support the mattress.  That's where the phrase "sleep tight" comes from.

I would have used parachute cord - breaking strength 550 lbs and it comes in 100 foot lengths.  I would have gotten two, and run one across the bed and the other lengthwise, interweaving the lengthwise one over and under each alternate crosswise rope.

Finally to keep it tight, I would have gotten four turnbuckles, like these:

http://www.amazon.com/RadioShack-Guy-Wire-Turnbuckles-2-Pack/dp/B007Z7KRNG/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1457805772&sr=8-8&keywords=turnbuckle

One on each end of each rope.

Regards
John


Good suggestions. The way I roped it is not conducive to tightening the rope since I don't have the adjustment bar.

The way you suggest roping it is the same as Off Grid 24/7. That way may be better especially without the adjustment bar.

I wonder if the turnbuckles will tighten the rope throughout. It might need to be a type of rope with minimal friction.
If you use poly rope, think boat rope, it usually doesn't stretch as much...

I have found that horizontal runs vs. diagonal runs don't sag as much.

I use a clove hitch on the rope ends, then add a knot to the loose end to totally prevent it from pulling through.

While the connectors from tarps.com are definitely sturdy, they also prevent the legs from folding, which can have pluses or minuses depending on your setup.  In my design I used strictly Home Depot parts to facilitate one stop shopping without the need of mail order...

Looks like you're on your way to a good sturdy, yet lightweight and breathable bed though, GOOD WORK!

Here's a picture of a clove hitch I found...

[attachment=6462]
Run a few cross members.  At least one or two and then put the rope in the same pattern in each section.
This is really awesome!

Gigi
(03-12-2016, 04:19 PM)Off Grid 24/7 Wrote: [ -> ]If you use poly rope, think boat rope, it usually doesn't stretch as much...

I have found that horizontal runs vs. diagonal runs don't sag as much.

I use a clove hitch on the rope ends, then add a knot to the loose end to totally prevent it from pulling through.

While the connectors from tarps.com are definitely sturdy, they also prevent the legs from folding, which can have pluses or minuses depending on your setup.  In my design I used strictly Home Depot parts to facilitate one stop shopping without the need of mail order...

Looks like you're on your way to a good sturdy, yet lightweight and breathable bed though, GOOD WORK!

Here's a picture of a clove hitch I found...

I started roping with horizontal runs but ran out of rope. It would take well over 100' for a twin bed and I couldn't conveniently get back to Home Depot. I went to the dollar store and bought poly rope but then I decided that mismatched rope wouldn't be a good idea. I may go back to Home Depot for more manila rope and redo the roping. I am anti-plastic and like to use natural whenever possible.

I was going to use six tees to connect the legs to the frame but I couldn't visualize how the crisscross roping of the legs would keep the bed from falling over. I can see how it would keep the legs from splaying out but not how it would keep the frame from falling to the right or to the left. Of course one side of the frame would be against the vehicle and if you angle the legs slightly that would pin it but I have the bed in the middle of my bedroom floor for now.
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