VanDweller Community Forums

Full Version: SPRAY FOAM INSULATION: Why I won't use it
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
I am coming to the conclusion that I will probably avoid spray foam. Reasons:
1. Spurious or not, health concerns are real and they never really stop off-gassing.
2. People use it to fill voids but according to some manufacturers it never cures under such conditions. 
3. Horror stories about uncontrolled expansion resulting in bulging body panels. Maybe that wouldn't happen to me, but maybe it would. 
4. That you have to wear a safety suit and masks to apply it.
5. It's really permanent. If you screw up, you are screwed.
6. Sounds messy.
7. My wife has had cancer twice and is very cautious about environmental exposure to chemicals. 
8. If carbon footprint and environmentalism is an issue, it seems odd to use a petroleum-based product to cut down on petroleum i.e. energy useage. 
9. Reports of rust and metal degradation. Illustrations of this in THIS forum.

Given the above-stated concerns about foam insulation, especially spray foam, I am wondering whether there is a cellulose-based automotive insulation. Maybe something in pads, foil-backed? What I have stumbled across so far is polyester. My wife is even thinking leave the interior uninsulated - and I know there are those who prefer the raw walls - and hang wool blankets on the walls when used for camping. Simplicity.
If even rigid poly iso is a concern for you, 3m thinsulate would be a much better option than nothing...
the problem with cellulose-based insulation is it absorbs moisture. the wool blankets would work I have done it on tents, but again they absorb moisture. however they can be easily removed and aired out(dried). highdesertranger
Spray foam has little insulation value unless it is at least 1" thick. You are better using polyiso or denim. I had a GMC motorhome that had tons of sprayfoam factory applied and it was basically worthless. It helped a little with heat conduction on the frame spars but there are better materials for that. I added denim insulation behind the walls and ceiling. Made a huge difference.

It does over expand and cause other problems. It made windows hard to slide in a house I owned...
(04-22-2016, 08:29 AM)ZoNiE Wrote: [ -> ]Spray foam has little insulation value unless it is at least 1" thick. You are better using polyiso or denim. I had a GMC motorhome that had tons of sprayfoam factory applied and it was basically worthless. It helped a little with heat conduction on the frame spars but there are better materials for that.  I added denim insulation behind the walls and ceiling. Made a huge difference.

It does over expand and cause other problems. It made windows hard to slide in a house I owned...

Thanks for the info.  I am interested in denim and will have to look it up.  Have heard about jute.
(04-22-2016, 07:41 AM)BradKW Wrote: [ -> ]If even rigid poly iso is a concern for you, 3m thinsulate would be a much better option than nothing...

Hi, I have looked up the 3M.  It is mainly used for clothing.  Have you used it to insulate a van wall or seen it used?  Thanks.
I wouldn't use anything that holds moisture, unless it's easily removable. highdesertranger
Since a van is nothing more than a small metal building on wheels, and people seem to use reflectix stuff for windows quite a bit, why not something like this to insulate all the walls?  http://www.ecofoil.com/Applications/Meta...Insulation
I would prefer to keep my windows available for use of light and air.
There is this Thermafleece wool-based insulation from the UK.

https://celticsustainables.wordpress.com...nversions/
(04-22-2016, 10:53 AM)glworden Wrote: [ -> ]There is this Thermafleece wool-based insulation from the UK.

https://celticsustainables.wordpress.com...nversions/

There are also US products such as this:
http://www.blackmountaininsulationusa.com/
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8