VanDweller Community Forums

Full Version: Tires
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
I would like to get a survey of what people are using.

   I have had someone tell me to avoid Firestone for the RV.  Just junk
   I had a worker at the tire store tell me that the Michelin tires have issues with sidewall failure
    Same guy recommend iron man ...never heard of it before.

   This is going to go on an e350 RV. (Total gross weight 10,000... Expected  finished curb weight 8,000). 

What do people use?  What weight vehicle?
I'm running Toyo AT2 tires on my Ram 2500. They were expensive, but it looks like I'll exceed the 50,000 mile warranty by a little and this is on a truck that weighs between 10,000 and 11,000 lbs most of the time. They are all terrain tires as my truck is 4 wheel drive. I've been happy with the traction and handling also - they of course don't have the same traction as a mud terrain, but do well, and handle better, along with no mileage penalty that I can see. I live in Colorado so drive on snow and ice all winter - performance has been good there also. The tires on my truck are 285/70/17 size, but they offer a wide range of sizes in this tire to meet many needs I plan to replace them when the time comes with the same tires, and I think I would run them on a van also if I had one. I'm actually thinking of putting a set on my cargo trailer conversion also.
never heard of Michelin having side wall failures. I kinda depends on your driving. If you are going to do a lot of off road driving I would recommend BFG All Terrains if you are doing mostly highway driving I would go with Michelin's. what ever you do get LT load range E tires and I would try to get made in the USA tires. also road hazard is a must, plus if you are traveling the country buy from a nation wide retailer so your road hazard is actually worth something. highdesertranger
Several people here recommended Michelin tires for me when I asked last spring.

Here in Canada they had the best warranty of anything I could find - 100,000 kms and they weren't considerably more expensive than other tires I looked at.

I like them, they're good on the road, and no complaints about noise. They also handled everything I threw at them in the AZ desert last winter.

Proper inflation for the load you're carrying is of great importance. Every time I have an oil change done I have to arm-wrestle with the guys who want to under inflate my tires. And they're not even the tire dealers who want them low on pressure so they wear out faster!

I'm running Michelin LTX MS/2s on my GMC 2500.
I'm a big fan of Goodyear Wranglers. I've got mudders on the back of my van which have held up extremely well for mudders. But my girlfriend just replaces a really nice set of all-terrain after 55,000 miles. They worked so great she bought the exact same tire.

They offer them with Kevlar on the sidewalls, I recommend that for the desert and off road where I like to go.
Bob
(06-15-2016, 07:56 PM)Almost There Wrote: [ -> ]Several people here recommended Michelin tires for me when I asked last spring.

Here in Canada they had the best warranty of anything I could find - 100,000 kms and they weren't considerably more expensive than other tires I looked at.

I like them, they're good on the road, and no complaints about noise. They also handled everything I threw at them in the AZ desert last winter.

Proper inflation for the load you're carrying is of great importance. Every time I have an oil change done I have to arm-wrestle with the guys who want to under inflate my tires. And they're not even the tire dealers who want them low on pressure so they wear out faster!

I'm running Michelin LTX MS/2s on my GMC 2500.


I just installed today a new set of 4 Michelin Defender LTX, this is a new release, they replaced the LTX MS/2. Michelin added new components that promises to last longer with a thread wear of 800 vs 720 on MS/2s. 70.000 mile warranty, not bad.
before I got my tires install, I went to michelinman.com and asked (via chat) recommended pressure and they said 29!
Not happy with that, I made a call to michelin tech center and the guy (very polite) based on the tire size and vehicle model said he would not recommend more than 36psi on both axles.
So 36 I said to the installer (Costco) and they were recommending 35psi front, 38psi rear.
My concern is that at 36psi they look under inflated, and the vehicle is not even loaded with camping stuff.
My van is a 03 GMC Savana 1500 conversion van.

"Almost There" What exact pressure are you running on your LTXs?
Bridgestone Duravis M700 HD here on a F-Superduty (Now known as an F-450) with a sixteen foot box and likely 13000 pounds. Loving them so far and best of all? Made in JAPAN! Sorry to the USA folks, but these are some quality shoes for the old girl!
(06-16-2016, 08:18 PM)03Savana Wrote: [ -> ]I just installed today a new set of 4 Michelin Defender LTX, this is a new release, they replaced the LTX MS/2. Michelin added new components that promises to last longer with a thread wear of 800 vs 720 on MS/2s. 70.000 mile warranty, not bad.
before I got my tires install, I went to michelinman.com and asked (via chat) recommended pressure and they said 29!
Not happy with that, I made a call to michelin tech center and the guy (very polite) based on the tire size and vehicle model said he would not recommend more than 36psi on both axles.
So 36 I said to the installer (Costco) and they were recommending 35psi front, 38psi rear.
My concern is that at 36psi they look under inflated, and the vehicle is not even loaded with camping stuff.
My van is a 03 GMC Savana 1500 conversion van.

"Almost There" What exact pressure are you running on your LTXs?

I'm on 225/75R16s with a maximum tire pressure shown on the tire of 80 PSI Cold for single tire. I run them at 60 on the front and 65 on the rear to help compensate for all the weight I have in the cargo area - 2 Whynter fridge units, 4 Trojan batteries, cabinets, bed, gear, more gear, storage, etc, etc. etc.

Check the tires themselves for the weight and pressure ratings and then do a quick calculation of how close to upper load limits you think you are.

There is actually a way to figure out if your tires are properly inflated for the load. I can't remember where I found it but it goes like this:

Take your vehicle with it's usual load to a paved parking area. Use a piece of kids sidewalk chalk to mark a straight line across the width of the tire tread. You can do all four wheels at the same time but it's easier to figure out if you just do one axle at a time. Clean the pavement of loose stones etc and then pull the vehicle forward until you've driven over the chalk lines you put on the tires.

If the tread lines from the chalk meeting the pavement are even all the way across the width of the tread then you're within a good pressure range. If the outside is missing, you're overinflated - the outside edges aren't hitting the pavement. If the inside is missing then you're underinflated - the sidewalls are supporting the tire.

Repeat until happy!!

I found that most places want to under inflate your tires. You get a slightly softer ride but you lose gas mileage and the tires wear faster. Not surprising if they're in the business of selling gas or tires... Rolleyes Rolleyes
I just replaced the tires on the 1993 Class C I recently purchased.
The Michelins that were on it were 13 years old with 20k+ miles on them, and looked like they could go another 20k.
I replaced with the same. I've heard nothing but good things about Michelin.
I put goodyear wrangler duratrac LT 265/70R17 on my 1500 silverado. they make so much noise that i don't drive over 40 mph with the windows down.
Pages: 1 2