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ok I got a ford conversion van what I need to know is should I take the walls down and look see what type of insulation is in the walls because there is pink fiberglass in the back door going to try  to get it ready for next summer so I probably ask questions to do this job and do it wright .
(07-08-2016, 05:21 AM)Buster My Service Dog Wrote: [ -> ]ok I got a ford conversion van what I need to know is should I take the walls down and look see what type of insulation is in the walls because there is pink fiberglass in the back door going to try  to get it ready for next summer so I probably ask questions to do this job and do it wright .

IIWM, I certainly would!

That pink insulation you see was probably used throughout the conversion and is either crammed in there, thereby reducing it's R value dramatically and/or missing in a lot of places.

Taking panels off will also let you see whether there have been any leaks like from the windows that need to be addressed.

Whether you gut the conversion van or leave the factory finish in place will be up to you but many end up gutting it entirely to build their own interior when they realize how much wasted space there is in the factory conversions.
(07-08-2016, 06:09 AM)Almost There Wrote: [ -> ]IIWM, I certainly would!

That pink insulation you see was probably used throughout the conversion and is either crammed in there, thereby reducing it's R value dramatically and/or missing in a lot of places.

Taking panels off will also let you see whether there have been any leaks like from the windows that need to be addressed.

Whether you gut the conversion van or leave the factory finish in place will be up to you but many end up gutting it entirely to build their own interior when they realize how much wasted space there is in the factory conversions.
I like the interior of the van but I know how that most of this type of work is done on the cheap most of the time
(07-08-2016, 06:20 AM)Buster My Service Dog Wrote: [ -> ]I like the interior of the van but I know how that most of this type of work is done on the cheap most of the time

should I go with the pink again or with the foam and a bubble wrap or both
if you are going to go the trouble I would reinsulate with polyiso foam. highdesertranger
(07-08-2016, 06:27 AM)Buster My Service Dog Wrote: [ -> ]should I go with the pink again or with the foam and a bubble wrap or both

Definitely switch out to the polyiso insulation rather than replacing the pink fiberglass where you can.

Taking apart the interior may be a little more complicated than you initially think it will be. You may want to just skip some areas knowing that it's a major job to get to the spot.

Whether you also add reflectix and bubble wrap (as a dead air gap) will depend entirely on what you want achieve.

There are many great discussions on the viability of various types of insulation and radiant heat barriers. Worthwhile studying up on them and the installation methods before you tackle the job.
(07-08-2016, 07:08 AM)Almost There Wrote: [ -> ]Definitely switch out to the polyiso insulation rather than replacing the pink fiberglass where you can.

Taking apart the interior may be a little more complicated than you initially think it will be. You may want to just skip some areas knowing that it's a major job to get to the spot.

Whether you also add reflectix and bubble wrap (as a dead air gap) will depend entirely on what you want achieve.

There are many great discussions on the viability of various types of insulation and radiant heat barriers. Worthwhile studying up on them and the installation methods before you tackle the job.

I want to keep in a budget and do the job wright there is going to be my service dog with me to
My conversion van wasted so much space on the walls. Several inches on each side.

The only thing I have remaining of original conversion van interior is some of the oak trim I retasked elsewhere.

Now I have 1/32 carpet underlayment super 90'd to the walls with another 1/8th inch white plastic sheeting and a white painted exterior. My fiberglass roof has only 1/2 inch polyiso and the white plastic sheeting.

My intended locations are mild climate, and in summer I can keep interior cooler or no hotter than ambient temperatures ( until late afternoon when ambient temps drop faster than the van can radiate the heat it stored) with the use of ventilation and reflectix window shades up front, and also covering the black windows which radiate a lot of heat to the interior when in direct sun.

I made widespread use of 12v computer fans and can exchange the full volume of air inside the an every 3 to 5 minutes with them. One fantastic fan on the roof on high speed could do a full exchange in under a minute.

If you do not want to screw with the interior, then concentrate on air exchange and research the methods to install a fantastik fan with a rainproof cover onto the roof. One does then require an open window or other way for air to be replaced what the fan will suck from the roof.