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Yes, I did a search for the use of Roxul here in the forums, and what I found didn't answer many questions.  Nothing personal, folks, but it appeared that several of the people were guessing or assuming.

Have you checked out the toxicity of most of the available insulations?  Here's some info (2011): http://www.healthyhouseinstitute.com/a-1...n-Overview
 &
http://www.healthyhouseinstitute.com/a-1...n-Overview (2010)
Spray foam: toxic
Rigid foam, polyiso, styrofoam, pink and blue foam: toxic
Pink fiberglass: dangerous, toxic, some of it stinks
Cotton: treated w/boric acid, sinus irritation; grown w/more pesticides than anything else, contains residue
Cellulose: absorbs moisture, about 20% is chemicals
Cork: fairly minor issues, but can be ten times the cost of fiberglass
Rock wool (Roxsul): minor contamination w/lignite and mineral oil, bound with phenolic resin (which is also used in medicinal products, including mouthwashes, toothache drops, throat lozenges, analgesic rubs, and antiseptic lotions, and smoking tobacco. https://www3.epa.gov/airtoxics/hlthef/phenol.html (2000)

What I'm drawing from all this is that everything seems to be either toxic or expensive.

In that case, what about applying multiple layers of the safest stuff, Reflectix?  By the way, the recommended air space was three-quarters of an inch.

Let's hear your opinions, folks!
everything is toxic when you get right down to it. pick your poison. I wouldn't use anything that could absorb moisture. highdesertranger
(08-06-2016, 10:15 PM)TrainChaser Wrote: [ -> ]Yes, I did a search for the use of Roxul here in the forums, and what I found didn't answer many questions.  Nothing personal, folks, but it appeared that several of the people were guessing or assuming.

Have you checked out the toxicity of most of the available insulations?  Here's some info (2011): http://www.healthyhouseinstitute.com/a-1...n-Overview
 &
http://www.healthyhouseinstitute.com/a-1...n-Overview (2010)
Spray foam: toxic
Rigid foam, polyiso, styrofoam, pink and blue foam: toxic
Pink fiberglass: dangerous, toxic, some of it stinks
Cotton: treated w/boric acid, sinus irritation; grown w/more pesticides than anything else, contains residue
Cellulose: absorbs moisture, about 20% is chemicals
Cork: fairly minor issues, but can be ten times the cost of fiberglass
Rock wool (Roxsul): minor contamination w/lignite and mineral oil, bound with phenolic resin (which is also used in medicinal products, including mouthwashes, toothache drops, throat lozenges, analgesic rubs, and antiseptic lotions, and smoking tobacco. https://www3.epa.gov/airtoxics/hlthef/phenol.html (2000)

What I'm drawing from all this is that everything seems to be either toxic or expensive.

In that case, what about applying multiple layers of the safest stuff, Reflectix?  By the way, the recommended air space was three-quarters of an inch.

Let's hear your opinions, folks!

As HDR says, virtually everything on earth is toxic in one way or another given the right/wrong application. Most of the available insulation materials are eliminated by their ability to absorb moisture and inability to shed it. Since I've not studied up on the actual toxicity levels, I'm not going to delve in to each one of them.

I've bolded the section of your post that I will respond to.

Reflectix is a radiant heat barrier with less than stellar insulative properties. Multiple layers of a radiant heat barrier, unless applied with a dead air space BETWEEN each layer of reflectix does NOT increase the R value by any great amount (it's about 1.1 per layer added) which IMO is a waste of money.

Here's a chart from Reflectix showing a great variance of air gaps required to achieve various R values (not radiant heat reduction) for housing installations. As you can see it varies from 1/4" to 9.5" but that is for R value, not radiant heat barrier usage.

http://www.reflectixinc.com/images/uploa...200615.pdf

For a van installation where achieving a 100% coverage and DEAD air space is nigh unto impossible with windows, ribs etc in the way, IMO using a single layer of the thickest bubble wrap you can get, a single layer of reflectix and sealing it the best you can with metal tape is about as good as you can do to achieve a RADIANT HEAT BARRIER. If you want insulation as well, then pick your best option and go for it.
Remember that insulation does not block heat or cold, it slows it
Bob advises the use of insulation only if you will have AC, or in cold environments where you will need to use a heater, and when I read his reasons, I have to agree
Yes, insulation only slows down the heat loss in the cold and buffers you a bit from the external heat.  A bowl of hot chili surrounded by six feet of the best insulation known to man will eventually freeze solid at low temperatures.

I have camped in a cargo van with insulation, and in one with windows and minimal insulation, and the difference is CONSIDERABLE!

It seems to me that if insulation is not exposed to large amounts of liquid water, proper ventilation should dry out moisture from breathing, humidity and temperature changes.

Toxicity is something that people have been trained to ignore, but traveling and sleeping confined in a small space wrapped in toxic materials seems foolhardy, at best.

What I'm taking from the posts I've found here is that no one knows about or uses Rock Wool insulation in any form.  I can deal with that.  But guesses tend to annoy me, because they take up valuable time and piss me off.
it seems that it might not be inert, in other words it has limits to exposure, in other words it's like everything else,

People can be exposed to mineral wool fibers in the workplace by breathing them in, skin contact, and eye contact. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set the legal limit (permissible exposure limit) for mineral wool fiber exposure in the workplace as 15 mg/m3 total exposure and 5 mg/m3 respiratory exposure over an 8-hour workday. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has set a recommended exposure limit (REL) of 5 mg/m3 total exposure and 3 fibers per cm3 over an 8-hour workday. from wiki.

it also is good at holding moisture. highdesertranger
I wouldn't even worry about it.

Why is insulation always the one thing people concern themselves with toxicity over? But you don't give a second thought to the foam in your car seats, the door panel trim, the dashboard cover or the thing burning fossil fuel that propels you down the road spitting out poisonous carbon monoxide while you go. Then there are the other vehicles that spit it out next to you, behind you, in front of you and no one ever worries about that though. Don't forget the packaging your food comes in, pesticides sprayed on it or the chemicals in the ingredients nobody can pronounce, what's stuffed inside your pillow, the dyes in your clothes, chemicals in your shampoos and laundry detergents, and the list goes on and on. We live in a very toxic world, so why is it always the insulation that scares people the most?
ERLH, I couldn't agree more. that was kinda the point I was trying to make. highdesertranger
I was thinking about rock wool, but have not seen any local. Home depot wants you to order a pallet if you go on-line. That is like a $500 gamble. I also am considering cellulose. Maybe putting it in plastic bags. Not so much for moisture protection but in case I have to pull a panel off sometime later I don't want that stuff going everywhere. Most of the air could be sucked out of the bag, so expansion and contraction wouldn't be a big issue. Denum is made from cotton which is grown with a lot of pesticides, but the insulation is made from recycled product. So most of it was washed a hundred times before it got recycled. Fiberglass has been used for a long long time, and I don't think there is much evidence that it is harmful unless disturbed. If you put a sheet of plastic over to seal it in place, it is about as good as anything.

A while back I went to the Home Depot web site and compared the R value of the different types of insulation. When you look per inch, the R value is not all that different between any of them.
I found my earlier post and here are the numbers that I came up with for R value per inch.

This is how it works out per inch, fiberglass 3.7, foam 3.8, denim 3.4, cellulose 4.6, rockwool 4.2.
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