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Hi there,

Been a member for a little while now but just finally got a van! It's a ford transit connect wagon. 

Since it's the wagon model it has all the molding that the cargo van does not, my idea is to keep this all intact and fill it with some sort of insulation. I wouldn't want anything that would be too difficult to get back out or clean up. I was thinking about old/summer/winter clothes, when I'm not using them. In addition to a layer of reflectix to go over wiring etc and the general body of the vehicle. 

I couldn't find any information on this, has anyone tried this? Is it too dangerous? Thanks! 

Jeff
I'd be worried that the cotton in the clothing would soak up moisture and mold. Just try leaving you cloths in the hamper too long and see how they smell.
Clothing will absorb and retain moisture and accelerate rust (this includes moisture from humid air).  Cotton will lose all insulating value when wet, wool and synthetics will loose some insulating value.  All would be difficult to dry out without removing.  You would be further ahead using isopoly or foamular or even styrofoam.

 -- Spiff
I agree, not something I would recommend. For temp placement, I still like Reflectix or its generic available here in the home/lumber larger retailers at a slightly less cost.
Just tossing this out there...those clothes storage bags that you suck the air out of, can't think of the name of any of them at the moment, but the ones that people use to store out of season stuff or whatever in smaller space...wouldn't those work at least from the moisture/mold point? Hmm, could possibly be a way for those tight on space to store out of season clothes... Opinions either way?
(09-04-2016, 03:50 PM)anewbiewannabe Wrote: [ -> ]Just tossing this out there...those clothes storage bags that you suck the air out of, can't think of the name of any of them at the moment, but the ones that people use to store out of season stuff or whatever in smaller space...wouldn't those work at least from the moisture/mold point?  Hmm, could possibly be a way for those tight on space to store out of season clothes... Opinions either way?

If you suck all the air out, I'm pretty sure you are removing the insulating value.
" I wouldn't want anything that would be too difficult to get back out or clean up."

Now, if my sister said that, it would be because she was going to make all of her decisions based on its resale value. Make your decisions based on the reason you bought it.

Why would you want to 'de-insulate' a van???
(09-04-2016, 05:09 PM)Optimistic Paranoid Wrote: [ -> ]If you suck all the air out, I'm pretty sure you are removing the insulating value.

You wouldn't have to suck all the air out as long as it's got that air-tight seal so hypothetically it could be done in a way to not remove all the insulation value.  Since the thought came into my head though, I kind of like it and can see myself personally adapting it in a dedicated accessible section, not for insulation, but for the out of season storage I mentioned. I will be far more concerned with heat than cold when I get on the road though.
clothing gets heavy.  How hard is a large garbage filled with clothes to lift?

Use styrofoam sheets.  They are light weight and easy to cut into shape.
wow thanks everyone! very good calls all around!
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