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Planning the build for the van I just bought.  I have watched tons of videos and read forums. I have narrowed down the insulation to polyiso, no reflectix, and probably some sound deadening material is certain places.
I like the idea of 1"x2"s as a framework on the floor, 1" polyiso in between and 3/4" plywood on top as the floor (maybe a floor covering in the non-bed and non-cabinet areas)
The question I have is:
1... do I just let the floor "float" OR 
2...screw it down to the van's metal floor (not liking this idea) OR
3... glue each layer down with Liquid Nails or some other appropriate glue.
Any experience or thoughts?
Thanks
I'm going to use a floating floor because everything I put on top of it is going to hold it down as well as most of what I put on it being secured to the walls in some way.

Also, if you ever wanted to remove the floor or repair a section of it, it's going to be MUCH easier if it isn't secured to the floor metal. I also don't want anymore holes in the floor because they are exposed to harsher conditions underneath making for more ways for the floor metal to corrode.
I'm using prodex under the Ford flooring rubber floor (fills grooves). Prodex will provide some sound buffering as well...I have to maybe put two layers on the wheel wells though. It's probably 1/3 the cost of reflectix. At the bottom of the index page here, Bob has a link for the newest stuff. I'll use non-skid floor protectors under any "furniture" I put in and they will be attached to the walls so they don't slide around and the floor shouldn't either. I am thinking of putting outdoor rugs (I have 2 matching nice ones I hope fit well) down on top of the rubber floor.

I guess it depends upon how heavy you are when you walk, and how heavy the things you're putting on that floor as to whether you want it moving, squeaking or whatnot?

If you screw it down, use furring strips attached at the sides, and still as you probably saw on those videos, you must seal those holes and screw or you will rust!
Polyiso will act as sound deadener. So fill the grooves in the van floor with lath strips in order to even things out, put down the polyiso, then cover it with plywood. Three-quarter inch is WAY overkill. You're not putting it over joists. Polyiso won't compress. All you need to do is protect it from punctures and gouges. Something like luan or masonite is plenty thick for your purposes.
I floated 3/4" plywood on the bare floor.

No matter what insulation method I've used on the walls and ceilings of vans, I've never insulated the floor. If it's cold out, there is no amount of insulation I could use that would keep the floor warm anyways.

BUT, I laid out the plywood such that all the seams were going to be under cabinetry. The only full sheet of plywood starts at the passenger side just behind the passenger seat(about equal to the side door opening. It was carved along the passenger side so that it fit snugly against the passenger side wall. A 2' x 8' piece, similarly carved on the drivers side was almost forced in to place...(snug fit!). Then the balance of the rear of the van was done, again matching against both walls and is snug to the closed rear doors.

I used 3/4" so that I had something thick enough to ensure a good hold from the screws that are holding all the cabinets/bed frame, etc. down to the floor.
There is no need to use lath strips.  The Poliso will compress.  I used 3/8 Advantek, and screwed it down with these.  Stainless steel self tapping flat head.  I did not want things jumping out of place if I was in an accident. 


https://www.grainger.com/category/self-d...subsetTest
Let it float. It's not going anywhere.
(10-31-2016, 09:52 PM)GotSmart Wrote: [ -> ]I used 3/8 Advantek...

A few years ago I did the advertising for Advantek and other Huber Engineered Woods products.  If you wanted to use it properly, you would've glued it as well as screwing it.  Big Grin

Mighty spendy stuff, and heavy (since it's mostly polymer adhesive) , but I supposed its water-resistant properties might be useful—especially with screw holes in the van floor.
(10-31-2016, 10:12 PM)MrNoodly Wrote: [ -> ]A few years ago I did the advertising for Advantek and other Huber Engineered Woods products.  If you wanted to use it properly, you would've glued it as well as screwing it.  Big Grin

Mighty spendy stuff, and heavy (since it's mostly polymer adhesive) , but I supposed its water-resistant properties might be useful—especially with screw holes in the van floor.

When I rebuilt the floor in the jewelry store, the owner wanted 3 layers of Advantek, (Glued and screwed) Then the 3,000 lb safe came in.  Then Durarock and tile.  It may have been excessive, but after the raccoon came through a hole and trashed his showroom, he was not about to go cheap. With the safe tiled in place, nobody could move it.  

Anyway, 3 + years, and no problems.
Just my case, 2007 Ford Van. I laid in 5/8" wood floor and screwed it down. It's solid, I can attach things to it and it has not been a problem at all.
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