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Full Version: Don't Forget A Blow Dryer In Cold Temps!
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I know all too well the importance of a blow dryer in an RV or to defrost a vehicle lock.  This morning we awoke, 2 dogs that were anxious to "go" and a frozen handle on the door.  Luckily, the door was to the south and only took about 2 or 3 minutes to break loose.  We are trying to finish up things here and an artic thing came in.  I have two dryers and I'm going to keep the other in the vehicle in case we get locked out.  

It appears many areas will be unseasonably cold this year.  We were running a good 10 degrees below normal and now probably 20 degrees.  Great year to decide to move out of the house.  We did have very light snow, just enough to get it wet and then freezing temps.  

Good news is that we stayed warm and cozy inside, just wasn't able to get out at the minute we decided to go!
Snow, where are you again? It's bitter here hitting 11 below last night and a balmy -7 right now.
I'm in central KS. I think it was 18 degrees last night and will be colder tomorrow night. Per the weather forecast, it looks like we'll get out the week of Christmas as we have to sort stuff from storage, small unit but full. Thrift shop here we come!

Also, researching and have learned another method is to use a cardboard tube (like TP one) and breathe into it. It takes very little moisture to seal one up.

The last owner of the trailer only kept it one year. There is a crack near where the door latch is, so I'm betting it got frozen once and he never stayed in here again. It would be frightening for people not used to "frozen" (I grew up with "frozen", "snow" is earned), but I wasn't too happy to have two anxious dogs, "legs crossed and eyes balls floating" and a frozen latch.
That's only good if you have power.

Turn on the van engine, crank the heater up to HIGH. And try getting out via one of the other doors -- sometimes one won't be frozen.

Here in the PNW, it will rain, then freeze; the water runs between the door and the frame, and the whole door is frozen in place. One of my neighbors told me to insert some plastic sheeting to prevent that, but it works better on swinging/barn doors than it does sliders. You have to work harder to get it to work with the slider.

To get into a vehicle from the outside, I usually just heat up the key with a lighter. When I get my van, I will buy a large suction cup and stick that over the barn door lock -- maybe that will help getting out from the inside. This kind might work ($6): https://www.amazon.com/Adams-Christmas-5750-88-1040-Suction-Wreath/dp/B0042SQPO6/ref=pd_sim_469_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=K0NMKPXSB0QKS5YR7YBX
I noticed both Amazon and Walmart carry this folding handle 12 vdc hair dryer.  (if you are without a 1500 watt inverter that could power a blow dryer like you would have at home).  


[Image: 14099f14-39d6-4705-bf30-539bc14146b6_1.d...nBg=FFFFFF]


https://www.walmart.com/ip/RoadPro-RPSC-...e/26382447

https://www.amazon.com/RoadPro-RPSC-818-...B000BHQ5JC
Thanks for the link on the 12vdc as I had seen them some years back. My husband purchased some lubricant/drier stuff and sprayed the lock set area and will also do around the door seal. Keeping the seals on doors and windows in a vehicle pays off as I have been iced out of my car more than once.
Our inveter could handle the hairdryer on high but it was used on low at around 400w while camping.
Lubrication is the word.

Lube the lock itself with a lock lube, non oily graphite. (Oil attracts gummy dirt like a magnet)

Use an oil on the lock/latch moving parts. (Oil repels water)

Use spray silicone on the rubber door seal and body mating surfaces. (Silicone prevents any frozen sticking. (Silicone is a lubricant and sheds water)

Now, the only time you'll deal with ice is in a horrible ice storm where your unit literally gets encased in measureable ice, but a few good raps on the door as you hold the latch open should free you.

Dave
I bet passing 180 watts, the tip on that ciggy plug gets twice as hot as the heating elements do. Of course that supposes the 12v receptacle's fuse does not blow first, or the wiring leading to it does not decide that it is time to release the stinky blue smoke.

Ciggy plugs have an affinity for listening to humans curse.
My 200w 12v coffee pot melted its own plug. Works so much better without it.
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