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Full Version: Replacement valve for bug spray shower?
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After a few months of thinking every day that I needed a shower in my rig, it finally became real few days ago. Well sort of.

I finally got the curtain rod up, shower curtains on it, tub underneath it, soap in shower, warmed up water, filled the sprayer tank, got naked, stood in the shower, and ...

The stupid little pressure relief valve on the side of the tank that I knew would be a problem when I first saw it became a problem. So after a few frustrating moments of messing with it, I finally took the pump handle off and dumped the water over my head using the sprayer as a cumbersome bucket. Highly annoying.

The problem is that the tank will not hold pressure because the pressure relief valve lets it out almost immediately. It did hold pressure and worked mediocre when I first got it about a month ago, but but now not at all. The tank simply will not hold pressure, even from only one or two pumps of the handle.

I want to pluck out that pressure valve, and replace it with some kind of actual better valve from the plumbing section of Home Depot or Lowe's. Or another source if that's important. I can drill the existing hole bigger, if needed, but not able to put threads in it. No tools for that.

Does anyone have any suggestions for a very simple on off valve I could screw into the tank? And any method tips for simplest way?

Tom

Photo of valve:

[attachment=11455]
What's the max pressure on the tank?

I have no idea, but are you thinking of something like this?

https://www.rcpw.com/snow-plow-parts/mey...06100.html
why not just plug it? or just get another spray bottle they are not that expensive. highdesertranger
I'd just replace the whole thing. I don't think that's a common problem and probably more a defective unit from the git go.
I don't know why they even have pressure reliefs. Maybe so you can release the pressure before opening the top? I can understand that reason if you have chemicals inside of the tank, (you don't want it to spray on you as you open the top), But with only water in the tank who really cares? I would just plug the hole with a nut and bolt. You are not going to pump the tank up to a dangerous pressure anyway.
Pressure: No way to know the answer to that as far as I know. It's just a typical cheap bug sprayer.

Type: No, not that one. I have a picture of one in my mind that I've seen before, but I can't find it on the internet right now. It's a brass valve that's screws directly down, but perpendicular to it is a short red bar/T handle.  As I recall,  the pressure on that one would vent through a hole in the top of the handle. The attached photos are not that one, but something similar.

Plug it:  That would work, but not be ideal. I like the idea of being able to release the unnecessary pressure when done so that the handle is easier to unscrew. That's the answer to Danny's question also.

New one:  Also possible, but nothing says it won't have the exact same problem, and I put some work into this one to get it all connected and spray painted it black already. I'd rather not waste that work if possible.

I think the best of all options is what I originally asked about -- finding a decent valve I can use to plug the hole.

Tom

[attachment=11464]

[attachment=11465]
Update:

My solution was to unscrew the original pressure valve that came embedded in the tank, drill it out to resize as necessary, and use epoxy to install a PVC valve that I purchased at one of the usual stores for about $5. There was specialized epoxy for plastics which was appealing, but I chose marine epoxy because it could be used on a wider range of materials beyond this one project.

I also bought a little bit of rubber gasket material and cut out a rubber gasket to go under the large screw top / pump handle. If I would have had an old dead intertube, like the one I just threw away before this project, I would have used that instead.

It's working great and holds much more pressure now than it did before. 

My only concern at the moment is that pouring near boiling water into the bug sprayer might end up melting the plastic intake tube that runs all the way to the bottom of a sprayer. I guess time will tell.

Tom

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Original pressure valve

[attachment=11734]


New pressure valve

[attachment=11735]
"My only concern at the moment is that pouring near boiling water into the bug sprayer might end up melting the plastic intake tube that runs all the way to the bottom of a sprayer. I guess time will tell."

Just add cold water first.
(03-04-2017, 10:20 AM)Michael4104 Wrote: [ -> ]"My only concern at the moment is that pouring near boiling water into the bug sprayer might end up melting the plastic intake tube that runs all the way to the bottom of a sprayer. I guess time will tell."

Just add cold water first.

I already do. The sprayer is one-quarter to one-third full of cold water before I start pouring in hot water. However, that plastic intake tube that I'm worried about is positioned directly in the pour line and is not movable. By the time the sprayer is full of water, and the water is all mixed together, there is no problem. But before it's mixed, the hot water is unavoidably poured directly onto that plastic tube until the sprayer is full.

So far, it hasn't melted anything as far as I know.

All in all, I'm quite happy with this newly modified bug sprayer shower. I was worried that it was going to be a drizzle or a mist. It is not. The stream that comes out of that kitchen sprayer is quite good. It takes five or six pumping sessions (10-20 pumps each time) to get through a shower.  More pumps as the water level drops. That's fine after you get used to it. Total water used is less than 2 gallons, and that includes enough water to wash off my feet on the way out of the tub, and usually to quickly rinse the shower curtain and tub.

Tom