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Looking to put some flooring down in my mini-camper (currently gutted). It's a newer model 2015 Ram Promaster City so there's no rust in sight however the paint on the floor has been scratched quite a bit by the previous owner. Is it necessary for me to prep this floor prior to laying down some plywood subfloor? I'd like to keep things simple. Not really looking to insulate (might be the wrong section for this) or deaden the floor just lay some plywood followed by either cork or laminate flooring. 

Would love some suggestions on:

if necessary, what's the best way to prep the floor to prevent rust?
what thickness and kind of plywood to utilize for subfloor?
pros/cons to cork and/or laminate flooring?
suggestions on trusted flooring brands to use?
other considerations?

There are 6 d-bolts that are stock in my van. I was considering using the existing bolt holes to secure the plywood and possibly cut out some sections of the main floor to expose/utilize the d-bolts for potentially hauling things in the future. Is this overkill or is there any reason why I shouldn't do this?

Thanks in advance! I know it's a can of worms so please feel free to answer any or all of my questions Smile

Photo of my van's floor. Should I treat it somehow or not?

[attachment=11693]
as far as the scratched up floor, paint it. highdesertranger
Looking at that picture, I'm having a hard time getting my head around that floor design...is each of those openings a cavity?

Definitely paint it, no sense in hiding bare metal under flooring of any sort when it's as simple as rolling a coat or two of Rustoleum on it.  

1/2" plywood would be fine, but I'd probably go with 3/4" rigid polyIso foam board, 1/4" luan, and your flooring. Glue the Iso to floor with Sikaflex-221, then luan to Iso with same product + lots of weights to hold it down while drying. Then a floating floor system over that.
I probably wouldn't do anything with the floor it don't look like its scratched down to the medal just into the primer. If your worried about the slightly scratched up floor wipe it down with some rubbing alcohol to remove any oils or dirt and paint it. I would get 5/8" or 3/4" plywood for your subfloor (not OSB or MDF) and whatever flooring you like best. I would probably use the D rings to secure the floor down too.
Or paint it with some of that rubbery bedliner stuff?
(02-28-2017, 09:39 PM)BradKW Wrote: [ -> ]Looking at that picture, I'm having a hard time getting my head around that floor design...is each of those openings a cavity?

... Then a floating floor system over that.

Roger that! Hmm not sure which openings you're referring to? But if you mean the black molded plastic near the sliding doors, well, that houses some sort of electrical sheath with wires etc (and yes it's below the main floor). It's pretty odd. Haven't decided whether to pull the plastic covers off and extend the floor to the edge of the door or cut the floor to somehow weave around these parts. I'll try to snap a picture with the plastic removed to share once I decide on materials and finalize things. Not sure I understand what a floating floor is so I guess I have more research to do ! Thanks for the suggestions !
I'd paint the floor after properly prepping it. However regular rustoleum is the last paint product I would choose. Their marine yacht enamels are 50% more money and 200% more durable, but do not put on too thick in one coat, nor more than one coat in 24 hours and let it cure for a day or 3 before walking/working on it.

Cork flooring is nice stuff, as it is soft and insulative, but the seams swell horribly when it gets wet, and it will get wet. I've installed plenty in homes, and the feel under foot is nice, and it is quiet, but I;ve replaced young sections that got wet. Also it expands and contracts a lot with temperature, and is designed to float on top of the vapor barrier with 1/4 or more more gap around the room perimeter, to be covered with trim.

If used in a Van, i think I would glue the cork laminate flooring together with titebond3, and to the subfloor, which was sealed on all 6 sides with polyurethane.

I used regular fake laminate wood flooring a decade ago. I wish instead I used real tongue and groove hardwood flooring and on the diagonal to bridge the front to back valleys on my Van's floor.
(02-28-2017, 11:12 PM)SternWake Wrote: [ -> ]I'd paint the floor after properly prepping it.  However regular rustoleum is the last paint product I would choose. Their marine yacht enamels are 50% more money and 200% more durable, but do not put on too thick in one coat, nor more than one coat in 24 hours and let it cure for a day or 3 before walking/working on it.

Thanks for the tips! I think, from your description, that going with cork might be slightly more work than I'm interested in. It sounds like fickle stuff. For my walls I am planning on putting up plywood and painting it white. Do you reckon the marine enamels would work well for that application as well? Sounds like good stuff from what I'm reading.
I am not sure how marine enamels work on bare wood. Usually bare wood is quite thirsty. Perhaps a regular primer would be more economical, but research that more.
(02-28-2017, 11:12 PM)SternWake Wrote: [ -> ]Also it expands and contracts a lot with temperature, and is designed to float on top of the vapor barrier with 1/4 or more more gap around the room perimeter, to be covered with trim.

If used in a Van, i think I would glue the cork laminate flooring together with titebond3, and to the subfloor, which was sealed on all 6 sides with polyurethane.

Doing some more research and have a question about vapor barriers. You mentioned cork flooring is designed to float on top of a vapor barrier with space and trim. Is a vapor barrier always necessary for installing flooring such as cork or vinyl plank in a van? If I'm understanding you correctly you are suggesting that subfloor itself function as the vapor barrier by coating it entirely in polyurethane? Is it also necessary to silicon caulk around the poly urethaned subfloor to keep water from reaching the metal floor (have seen several people do this in tutorials)? And would a gap still be left for cork expansion on the edges in this case? Sorry for all the questions! I've heard different accounts about whether it's wise to use vapor barriers since they can possibly cause condensation to get trapped.
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