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I was reading about this on the web...went to their website:

Insulation4less.com

Lots of claims.    What do you folks think of this?
Seems a bit pricy, but if a double layer fits in the walls and provides 21R.   Plus being easier to install..I might go for it.   But, seems too good to be true.
21R? Prob not. Looks kinda similar to Reflectix double sided bubble stuff.
Test parameters for R value claims:

"*Parameters of test: 24-inch on center 2" x 6" wood assembly. Roof application. Test method ASTM 1116. Airspace of 2.64 inch on each side of product. Heat-flow direction down. Interior side of product exposed."

Air space is the key here. Gluing this stuff to your van walls will definitely help some as an insulator and sound deadener, but R16 ain't gonna happen with one layer (or R21 with two).

 5mm (0.2") closed cell polyethylene foam between foil sheets......

Sprayed polyurethane foam is rated R7 at one inch thick.

If 'polyethylene' is that much more effective, wouldn't refrigerated trucks, coolers, freezers, etc. be using it instead?

I still think 1/2" - 1" polyiso sheets are the best bang for the buck (not to mention less messy and ease of use).

my 2 cents.


Check out the negative reviews at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Prodex-Total-Inch-Insulation-700/product-reviews/B000NNGA3A/ref=cm_cr_getr_d_show_all?pageNumber=1&reviewerType=all_reviews

Be sure to read all of them, and how the company figures the R-value (some 'creative license' is used there). And how well it does in a house isn't quite the same as in a metal van. They say 'no condensation', but if you've got that kind of insulation on the inside and sheet metal changing temps on the outside, I suspect that doesn't hold true. Basically, the word is "They use deceptive advertising and pricing schemes. But the product is junk as well."
I put Prodex in, first for sound management. It doesn't have to be totally sprayed with adhesive and stuck... it uses double stick tape every 2'.
The Prodex was nearly half the price of the Reflectix which is why I considered it in the first place (then the no $20 a can 3M adhesive...)
Be very educated about "R" values... reading the fine print you will find the air gap that was required during the testing... and there is always at least a 1" air gap to give ANY "R" value.

I added an additonal cover it all layer before going out to the RTR, for warmth factor and it did very well. (I've since removed that so I can finish it all better and with more closed cell...)

ALSO... and I might post this elsewhere.... THINSULATE is another expensive product. It kept catching in my craw until I thought about it.... they used to make QUILT BATTING! (maybe still do!)... so I priced quilt batting at the fabric store...and realized I HAVE 6 old pillows at home with the same stuff in it! I have since ripped open a pillow and am stuffing some of the deep hole pockets in my Transit with it (cleaned of course.) The pillows were $3 each at Walmart btw and gives more than the 28 ounce quilt batting bag for $8.00 from what I figure.
Thank you all for your advice.

After reading the reviews...here and on the web...decided to skip this product and just go with good ole reflectix. Order should arrive next Thursday.

Now to find a source for polyiso...
Hmmm Reflectix is more expensive, plus you spend the $$$$ on the expensive spray adhesive. How did you come to this conclusion I wonder?
(03-04-2017, 07:41 PM)DrJean Wrote: [ -> ]I put Prodex in, first for sound management.  It doesn't have to be totally sprayed with adhesive and stuck... it uses double stick tape every 2'.
 The Prodex was nearly half the price of the Reflectix which is why I considered it in the first place (then the no $20 a can 3M adhesive...)
Be very educated about "R" values... reading the fine print you will find the air gap that was required during the testing... and there is always at least a 1" air gap to give ANY "R" value.

I added an additonal cover it all layer before going out to the RTR, for warmth factor and it did very well. (I've since removed that so I can finish it all better and with more closed cell...)

ALSO... and I might post this elsewhere....   THINSULATE is another expensive product.   It kept catching in my craw until I thought about it....  they used to make QUILT BATTING!  (maybe still do!)...  so I priced quilt batting at the fabric store...and realized  I HAVE 6 old pillows at home with the same stuff in it!   I have since ripped open a pillow and am stuffing some of the deep hole pockets in my Transit with it (cleaned of course.)   The pillows were $3 each at Walmart btw and gives more than the 28 ounce quilt batting bag for $8.00 from what I figure.

Is fire safety a concern at all regarding the loose pillow fabric? I'm thinking that stuff has a bad burn rating, no?
None of the reflective materials have an R-Value. R-Value is a standard set by the government and adopted by industry as a universal standard. It's universally understood that Reflective materials have zero insulation value. When a company claims its Radiant barriers have an R-Value, it is a made-up number they pulled out of the air, it's totally meaningless.

There are no government or industry standards for Radiant materials because they have none.

On the other hand, when Polyiso claims an R-Value of 6.2, that number is backed-up by government testing and industry standards. It's a real number and has real value.

Buy Polyiso with a reflective layer on one side, and it will do the exact same job as Reflectix and also have a real R-Value (the highest of all sheet goods).
They are all tested using the same tests. I think a combination of a radiant barrier attached to an insulating product AND a closed cell foam probably works for all types of barriers (sound, radiant, moisture...)?

http://firestonebpco.com/assets/2016/03/...lletin.pdf

https://greenbuildingsolutions.org/blog/...-r-values/

A radiant barrier's effectiveness depends on proper installation

When installing a foil-type barrier, it's important to allow the material to "droop" between the attachment points to make at least a 1.0 inch (2.5 cm) air space between it and the bottom of the roof. Foil-faced plywood or oriented strand board sheathing is also available.

Radiant barriers consist of a highly reflective material, usually aluminum foil, which is applied to one or both sides of a number of substrate materials such as kraft paper, plastic films, cardboard, oriented strand board, and air infiltration barrier material. Some products are fiber-reinforced to increase durability and ease of handling.

Radiant barriers can be combined with many types of insulation materials in reflective insulation systems. In these combinations, radiant barriers can act as the thermal insulation's facing material.


Prodex has on their site the testing that discloses the 1" air gap within the "test box".... perhaps because of the issues Reflectix got into for fraudulent advertising?
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