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Ok ... I see many builds using tongue and groove pine and I have priced it and it is reasonable. My question is.... how much warping happens with this build? I have seen several people talk of warping in the heat and I was wondering how I could avoid such a thing when I build... if there is a way? I noticed that one guy built with the tongue and groove pine and then later it looks as if he went and put up a plywood wall over it. I would ask him but can't get a hold of him to find out why. So if anyone has any advice I could sure use it! HuggZ
narrower strips = less noticeable warp or gaps from shrinkage.

moisture/temperature extremes= more warping/swelling/shrinking/cracking.

prefinishing both sides with a sealer can slow the transfer of moister within paneling and therefore help minimize all that movement.

A plus is that thin, narrow strips can be handled by one person easier than large panels, and can be bent (within limits)to fit the curve of a van easier.

t/g needs straps or some sort of nailbase to glue and nail/screw to....

I have come to prefer wood as framing and accents where movement with humidity is less of a visual or structural issue...now I tend to use cloth glued over foam, then painted for most of my interior and thin plywood and solid wood for shelving and cabinetry......
of course, it may be that after 40 years of installing t/g in homes and cabins- I'm just tired of it..LOL

Box stores like Home Depot carry prefinished 4x8 panels that are beaded to resemble t/g as an alternative also....


Sort of on topic; I used to work at a home improvement store and one day I saw a new product, tongue and groove cedar closet lining, at an unbelievable price. Turned out to be a typo ($5 instead of $50), but several customers and employees had grabbed a couple of boxes before it was fixed, myself included

Anyway, I had a pick'em up truck with a camper shell back then, and used the t&g on top of the textured plastic bedliner to make a level floor, using gorilla glue to hold it together. Bottom line: I don't know how t&g pine would work for walls, but the cedar version worked great for truck bed flooring. I never had a problem with moths getting into my clothes or food, either.
I suspect the amount of warpage would depend on how well the strips were attached to the base layer: a good layer of a water resistant glue should hold the strips firmly.
The reason I was asking was in reference to a vardo. The guy said he used 3/4in on the sides and wished he would of used 1/4 in instead. Do you think that could of caused the warping? 

Thanks so much for the info everyone I do so appreciate it HuggZ
Pine is a very soft wood.
Even though the surface may feel hard, once you scratch it, you can tell just how soft the inner heart of the wood feels.
While pine is often used in spite of this issue, when this wood gets wet, it is very apt to warp.
Warping is caused when moisture soaks into the soft wood.
The wood expands when wet, and then contracts once it dries out.
The result can range from slight warping to very badly damaged wood.

every board needs to be sealed six sides before installing ....

blkjak ....
what would be a harder more sturdy wood to use? 
hardwoods are too expensive ....

i used square edged #1 pine with two coats of quality deck paint 6 sides ....

i used phillips washer head screws face applied 1&1/2 inch long #10 - two fasteners per connection - spaced boards 1/8 inch ....

i covered the framing first with heavy gorilla tape to prevent squeaks ....

blkjak ....

Sounds like a great idea!
tip - layout you exposed fasteners for a better finished product ....

so you have a vertical center line and a set dimension spacing for the two fasteners per connection ....

blkjak ....

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