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Just recently I was talking with my daughter (the soon to be vandweller) whom is selling her home, planning to buy a piece of property to homestead.  There are several close by counties that allow homesteading or at least have lowered their building codes to accommodate homesteading & tiny home occupancy.  She had been living in her 12 x 12 since Oct '16 as a trail run to see how she could adapt to the VanDwelling life.  She loves it.  Her renters were a young couple that both had jobs, a little higher than minimal wage but still could never seem to get enough to pursue the American Dream.  

Here is my thoughts, they are on numerous waiting lists for suitable apartments or houses. They have grouped with 2 other couples & placed their names on multiple lists hoping to get a place to rent.  The housing market here in OR is horrendous, they are building non-stop but losing ground to the influx of new residents including the homeless crowd.  To get on the list they must put down a deposit for each tenant, average $50 more or less, the fee is NON-REFUNDABLE, they say it's for the cost of a background check & referrals & such.  The couple has only had one referral since Oct.  But still keep putting their names on the lists.  

I'm sure everything is on the up & up, with all the honest property management companies taking their deposits.  They mentioned they were on 8 lists (8 X 2 X $50 = $800) if each couple they are coupled with has paid the $800 then the Mgt Company has now pocketed $2400 for one referral.  There are several companies within our area all taking the names of countless people, anyone what to guess how many prospective renters that involves?  I'm sure there's other gratuities involved if they do finally get a rental either from them or the landlord.  WHAT A SCAM!  We have tent cities all over the place, under overpasses, along river banks, parks, streets & the panhandling that goes on at each offramp is laughable.  Each has a nice bike & big dog sitting by their side, while they sit with their cardboard sign on a 5 gal bucket.
(06-03-2017, 01:29 PM)grandpacamper Wrote: [ -> ] I'm sure everything is on the up & up, with all the honest property management companies taking their deposits.  They mentioned they were on 8 lists (8 X 2 X $50 = $800) if each couple they are coupled with has paid the $800 then the Mgt Company has now pocketed $2400 for one referral.  
Maybe somebody like you should gather as much data on them as possible and report them to the Feds?
Forgive me but I wasn't too sure what the post was about. At first I thought maybe homesteading due to this statement: "homestead.  There are several close by counties that allow homesteading or at least have lowered their building codes to accommodate homesteading & tiny home occupancy."  Which would have been good to read about since western Oregon is pretty prime real estate. But then it went to renters on waiting lists and the exhobitant costs. 

Is the topic about your daughter who is soon to be van dwelling or mostly about the lower income housing shortage in Oregon (Portland or other cities I presume). I'm just confused.  
Huh

I couldnt tell the date of this article (poo) but here is a portion of it: 

Open Section 8 Waiting Lists in Oregon 



[Image: open-section-waiting-list.jpg]


Many people are under the misconception that the section 8 waiting list in Oregon is closed until further notice. Afterall, it wasn't that long ago that Multnomah County opened their list for a few days, allowing sum 20 thousand people to apply, only to choose 3000 applicants to add to their waiting list, and then reclose it. Those 3000 applicants were chosen via a lottery.

Given the need in Multnomah county, this seems like a pretty fair way to handle the overwhelming requests.

The list in Washington County, and in Tillamook County are closed too, in fact that's the case in many counties around the world. But... if you REALLY want to get yourself a section 8 voucher, which is now more commonly called a Housing Choice Voucher, well, I'll tell you how.

You can wait for one of the major county's to open their lists. Then see if you're a lucky lotto winner, and I wish you luck. I plan to do just that.

I also plan to seek out lessor known counties in Oregon and apply with them. There are counties with open lists. In some cases, you can even use that voucher in the county you want to live in! You may be able to immediately port your voucher to Multnomah, Clackamas, or Washington county, or you might have to wait a year, in the county where you applied, and then port to your county of choice, or you might just be stuck where you applied.


Taken from: http://oregonlowincomehousing.blogspot.c...-many.html
(06-03-2017, 01:29 PM)grandpacamper Wrote: [ -> ]Just recently I was talking with my daughter (the soon to be vandweller) whom is selling her home, planning to buy a piece of property to homestead.  There are several close by counties that allow homesteading or at least have lowered their building codes to accommodate homesteading & tiny home occupancy.  She had been living in her 12 x 12 since Oct '16 as a trail run to see how she could adapt to the VanDwelling life.  She loves it.  Her renters were a young couple that both had jobs, a little higher than minimal wage but still could never seem to get enough to pursue the American Dream.  

This was my attempt to introduce the subject I wanted to open for discussion.  Sometimes I relate too many mundane details,  Sorry.

Here is my thoughts, they are on numerous waiting lists for suitable apartments or houses. They have grouped with 2 other couples & placed their names on multiple lists hoping to get a place to rent.  The housing market here in OR is horrendous, they are building non-stop but losing ground to the influx of new residents including the homeless crowd.  To get on the list they must put down a deposit for each tenant, average $50 more or less, the fee is NON-REFUNDABLE, they say it's for the cost of a background check & referrals & such.  The couple has only had one referral since Oct.  But still keep putting their names on the lists.  

I'm sure everything is on the up & up, with all the honest property management companies taking their deposits.  They mentioned they were on 8 lists (8 X 2 X $50 = $800) if each couple they are coupled with has paid the $800 then the Mgt Company has now pocketed $2400 for one referral.  There are several companies within our area all taking the names of countless people, anyone what to guess how many prospective renters that involves?  I'm sure there's other gratuities involved if they do finally get a rental either from them or the landlord.  WHAT A SCAM!  We have tent cities all over the place, under overpasses, along river banks, parks, streets & the panhandling that goes on at each offramp is laughable.  Each has a nice bike & big dog sitting by their side, while they sit with their cardboard sign on a 5 gal bucket.

This was my concern, I was wondering if this was going on.  No one had an answer, some just shrugged their shoulders & said, they assume the money is probably being pocketed.  

I will try to be brief from this point on. I actually thought it was self explanatory, but what do I know not being a writer.
As a ex-landlord I can tell you those management companies do not get to pocket that application fee.

The agencies that do nationwide background checks and criminal checks require the landlord to pay $30 each for them. Then another $20-$25 for the credit check. Which includes the full credit report.

This is paid per person. This is done through a direct bank withdrawal.

So...for each person I paid $50-55. I did not "pocket" any money in this process.
But, I sure wasn't paying that myself. I started absorbing that cost. But...after 3 or 4 prospects failing ...I quickly realized I was paying a lot of money and still had no qualified tenant.
I was under the impression that background checks can be done thru subscriptions services. No matter either way. This whole concept of having to pay for your own background\credit checks is sketchy as hell. Who benefits and who loses? I know who loses, those that don't have the resources to afford this multiple times. Who benefits? No idea, but I have some thoughts. If you're on the side of, "its cool, nothing to see here", then count yourself lucky that your able to think that. A lot of people aren't as lucky and think the process is a setup\scam. Hope you never find yourself or someone you care about on that side of the fence. Life is cool, but realistically, its mostly luck. I do understand the averting ones eyes and keeping your mouth shut about things that seem hinky, if you don't, the pack might turn on you. Everyone knows this, self preservation just prevents them from admitting it to themselves. Or, maybe I'm an idiot(I am) and I'm completely off base and I need to drink more of the delicious koolaid. Who knows.
Wabbit.... why would you think that a landlord should absorb the cost of doing those checks?
Yeah..it is a subscription service...and it costs and average $15 per person, per check. Nothing scetchy about it. As a landlord, I HAD to do complete vetting. As a landlord, I could not afford to pay out of my own pocket for every application. This could run into several hundreds of dollars each time I rented a place!

I get that it is a bummer that people had to file multiple application with various places. But, it is what it is. I know many of the tenants I had through the years had great credit and clean backgrounds......they only ever made one application because they knew wherever they wanted to go they would be accepted.

So..any way, don't make it sound like landlords are making money on this....they aren't.
like had as in required by law? if so that's BS.
(06-06-2017, 12:03 AM)RoamingKat Wrote: [ -> ]Wabbit....  why would you think that a landlord should absorb the cost of doing those checks?

Because it's a deductible business expense?
I would think anyone who could afford to own and maintain income producing property should be able to afford credit checks as a cost of doing business.
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