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Anyone have any tips for making thick (>2") semi-rigid foam window covers that can be removed? I've been searching a while now...

In my last vehicle I had, like most people here, reflectix and these custom roll-up covers of a similar thin, shiny material.  The insulation wasn't enough, plus they were really awkward to store when I wanted the window.  Also, the shininess isn't stealth.  

I want foam panels now that I can store up on the ceiling, and mount with magnets or something when I want to sleep.  

Ideally they'd be white on the inside (since my interior is white), black or gray on the outside (to make the window look tinted... though I think gray would be better since it would look closest to the sky in the daytime? Too tinted and the cops might think I illegally tinted my windshield)
I can't see any way to hold 2" thick foam in place unless  you have 2" of space between the glass and surrounding supports, which I doubt you do.

You will need:
* Rigid foam insulation of your choice; stick a magnet to the window frame & measure the distance from the glass to the side of the magnet nearest you -- this is the absolute maximum foam insulation thickness.
* Thin, cheap wood paneling material,
* A good adhesive like Gorilla Glue (it's strong, and it doesn't have solvents that can melt plastic foam) and
* Some decent magnets (I would use those reasonably common 1 7/8 x 7/8 x 3/8" flat ones WITHOUT ADHESIVE).  

Make a paper pattern of your window(s) at the edges of the glass.  I would transfer that to cardboard, but you could use the paper pattern if you're careful.  Transfer the design to foam and cut it out. Make sure each piece fits right against the glass, so trim if needed.

Measure the outside edge of the metal window framing on the sides, and cut the paneling almost the same size.  The paneling pieces must be wider than the foam pieces, like wings.

Mark the back of the paneling after you center the foam on it -- you don't need to apply adhesive to the 'wings'.  Apply your adhesive as directed.  You don't need to apply Gorilla Glue over the entire surface -- cut some holes in your paper or cardboard pattern and apply glue in the same places on the foam and the paneling.  Put them together and put some weight on the top.  Here are more tips for Gorilla Glue:  https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/us...?docId=624

When the foam and paneling are done, use the Gorilla Glue to fasten the magnets to the 'wings', and clamp or weight down.  Let cure overnight.

Cover the foam that faces the window with whatever material you want, but be sure to include the thickness in your original measurements.  Bare foam will deteriorate in sunlight.  Just gluing on some fabric should protect it enough.

"Stealth" camping depends more on where you park and what you do that attracts attention.  Common sense will go a long way in helping with this.
I can't see any way to hold 2" thick foam in place unless  you have 2" of space between the glass and surrounding supports, which I doubt you do.

You will need:
* Rigid foam insulation of your choice; stick a magnet to the window frame & measure the distance from the glass to the side of the magnet nearest you -- this is the absolute maximum foam insulation thickness.
* Thin, cheap wood paneling material,
* A good adhesive like Gorilla Glue (it doesn't have solvents that can melt plastic foam) and
* Some decent magnets (I would use those reasonably common 1 7/8 x 7/8 x 3/8" flat ones WITHOUT ADHESIVE).  

Make a paper pattern of your window(s) at the edges of the glass.  I would transfer that to cardboard, but you could use the paper pattern if you're careful.  Transfer the design to foam and cut it out. Make sure each piece fits right against the glass, so trim if needed.

Measure the outside edge of the metal window framing on the sides, and cut the paneling almost the same size.  The paneling pieces must be wider than the foam pieces, like wings.

Mark the back of the paneling after you center the foam on it -- you don't need to apply adhesive to the 'wings'.  Apply your adhesive as directed.  You don't need to apply Gorilla Glue over the entire surface -- cut some holes in your paper or cardboard pattern and apply glue in the same places on the foam and the paneling.  Put them together and put some weight on the top.  Here are more tips for Gorilla Glue:  https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/us...?docId=624

When the foam and paneling are done, use the Gorilla Glue to fasten the magnets to the 'wings', and clamp or weight down.  Let cure overnight -- you want the tightest possible bond, not the fastest.

Cover the foam that faces the window with whatever material you want, but be sure to include the thickness in your original measurements.  Bare foam will deteriorate in sunlight.  Just gluing on some fabric should protect it enough.

"Stealth" camping depends more on where you park and what you do that attracts attention.  Common sense will go a long way in helping with this.
Here's an idea that I haven't tried yet:
Cover pillow forms, cut to fit the window, with fabric.
Use velcro dots attached to window frame & edges of window "pillow" to secure.  
When not needed to cover windows, use the pillows as ... pillows Wink  Or at least toss them anywhere without damage.

I plan to give this a try when I get to that point in my build.  We'll see how it goes.
After fiddling with this for a bit I've realized that I need 'squishy' foam that can compress into the window area then expand out a bit to block sunlight. I think that means the foam needs to be 'open celled' rather than 'closed celled' which, a foam guy told me, will get mold? .
It will only get mold if it gets wet and then isn't allowed to dry out.

Not sure why you want the foam to be 2" thick though, IMO, you don't need anything nearly that thick. All you're wanting to do is block light transmission from both the inside and the outside of your vehicle.

Depending on the window you could use either magnets around the edges or something like I saw one woman do with her Honda - she used clothes pins that she's snapped apart and tossed the spring piece out. They stuck neatly in the gap between the window and the window channel and held her window covers in place - in her case reflectix but it could have been anything.

If you want 2 colors (one inside and one out) then I'd use 2 pieces of foam and glue them together.
(06-06-2017, 07:57 PM)Svenn Wrote: [ -> ]Anyone have any tips for making thick (>2") semi-rigid foam window covers that can be removed? I've been searching a while now...

In my last vehicle I had, like most people here, reflectix and these custom roll-up covers of a similar thin, shiny material.  The insulation wasn't enough, plus they were really awkward to store when I wanted the window.  Also, the shininess isn't stealth.  

I want foam panels now that I can store up on the ceiling, and mount with magnets or something when I want to sleep.  

Ideally they'd be white on the inside (since my interior is white), black or gray on the outside (to make the window look tinted... though I think gray would be better since it would look closest to the sky in the daytime? Too tinted and the cops might think I illegally tinted my windshield)

Not sure if I would go with 2 inch foam that would be rather bulky to store? I have chloroplast and MYLAR glued together with DUCT TAPE around the edges. SUPER TOUGH and reflects the heat. I have one side painted black the other side is silver. IF I make another set they will be ALL SILVER or Mylar. When the summer is full tilt I found the BEST way to keep the heat out of the car is to cover the exterior. I do this with the FLYING CAR COVER I have pretty much worn mine out but it does work you can probably build your own if you have the material . I ended up gluing a very thin MYLAR emergency blanket to the flying car cover and it did great. You know in the SUMMER TIME I WOULD LIKE TO JUST GET A GOOD MYLAR BLANKET AND SEE ABOUT JUST LIGHTLY GLUING IT TO THE CAR. Maybe with school glue in the center with silicone around the edges. I tink it would be worth it to coat your roof with this space age material. Not sure how it would hold up if it last a season it is worth the trip.