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Have any of you used Dynamat or similar product to insulate a truck cab as well as deaden sound? The last time I was driving in heavy rain the noise was really loud. Does Dynamat insulate well, from heat and cold, pretty well? Or at least as much as possible in a truck cab?

Thanks
Yes lots of cheaper knockoffs, make a big difference for noise.

Works by adding weight to the sheet panels.

For thermal insulation barely any difference at all for the price, need bulk and reflective, thermal barrier etc, lots of approaches.

If you're doing it for noise anyway it will help thermal but just a little.
I'm not using dynamat but I am concentrating on a more sound deadening project.  I have a 2012 gmc savana passenger van completely stripped out at the moment.  I started out only planning to use as a tow vehicle. But after removing most of the Oem pretty plastic the noise was unbearable.  I researched sound deadening for mobile vehicles and found that first taking care of the resonance with cld tiles and then laying a cover of MLV (mass loaded vinyl) a significant noise reduction is noticed.  The original mat with little insulation is applied over the mlv and the diffence in thermal is probably not all that great but thermal insulation will be concentrated to behind the driver seat.  The noise reduction is significant.
I used a bunch of it in my previous van but I don't have any plans to do it with my new van. If road noise when driving is an issue for you it will help with that. There is much cheaper stuff available in the roofing section of hardware stores that is pretty much the same thing.

I would not count on it keeping noise in/out of the living area or helping with temperature. Foam board is king there.
Dynamat is just air duct insulation with a name stamped on it. So, if you want to use it you can go MUCH cheaper for the same thing.
That said, it works mostly as just a radiant barrier though it does give you some low frequency sound dampening.
There's better ways to do it for even less money though. Even when you need to go thin on materials (which I assume is an issue).
I guess I'll be the opposing viewpoint although I understand the previous comments. I have several vintage trucks and they all suffer from a lack of insulation and rattles in addition to lots of heat transfer through the firewall and other areas. I used rattletrap which is considerably thicker and stickier and does a better job. There is a considerable difference in temperature transfer in addition to the lack of buzzing/rattles and road noise. It really changes the experience of driving and enjoying your truck or car. I put reflectix over the rattletrap for maximum protection from the heat. I'm really pleased with the result in all my trucks. If you drive on gravel and dirt roads and do dispersed camping you will really notice the difference. Washboard roads used to drive me crazy with the noise- In many of the videos on camping that I've watched it's hard to hear the moderator due to the racket.
The real issue for my decision making process was the potential off gassing of harmful vapors. Find stuff that has a MDS tag. Material Data Sheet. We spend a great deal of time inside a space not initially designed for it. Dynamatt was originally designed for car audio to improve sound by deadening panels and reducing road noise. The previous post about what it was originally used for is correct and if you can find stuff with an acceptable MDS then Bob's your uncle. But this stuff was going to be used in an HVAC application with a ton of airflow and known temperature fluctuations. A van in the sun in say Slab City surpasses those design numbers pretty quick. It has to be safe for a fire in an HVAC application but in a van you may get high heat numbers without any chance to vent and clean. Moisture is the other consideration that is less present in HVAC applications. Again it might work just fine but if I had small pets, or children I would seriously take a close read of the material data sheets. I have used Dynamat and Luxury Liner Pro in all my vehicles as I like things quiet. If you use the stuff with the foil backing use gloves working with it as it cuts nasty quick. Tape the seams with the tape they sell or a different brand, doesn't matter, as little paws will find little holes. For those connected types. If you do the whole inside without any gaps you create a "kinda" faraday cage so signal transmission can be an issue. Leave a gap or run a wire outside of the enclosure.
a note for those that don't know. it's called a MSDS = Material Safety Data Sheet. you need to ask for a MSDS. highdesertranger
(07-17-2017, 09:02 AM)highdesertranger Wrote: [ -> ]a note for those that don't know.  it's called a MSDS =  Material Safety Data Sheet.  you need to ask for a MSDS.  highdesertranger

Thanks thinking in Russian and typing in English  Tongue
(07-16-2017, 01:12 AM)Reducto Wrote: [ -> ]I used a bunch of it in my previous van but I don't have any plans to do it with my new van. If road noise when driving is an issue for you it will help with that. There is much cheaper stuff available in the roofing section of hardware stores that is pretty much the same thing.

I would not count on it keeping noise in/out of the living area or helping with temperature. Foam board is king there.

Hello,

Can you link to an example on Home Depot or Lowe's website or possibly give the name of a roofing product?  Many thanks.
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