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Anyone who has had drafty vans how did you solve that problem? Waking up to a van that is 36 degrees inside is no fun, and I think a big issue is cold air rushing in during the night after my heater has done its work and I've gone to bed.

Does standard weather stripping and caulk work on van doors?
fixing the existing factory seals and adjusting the doors usually works best. however it's almost always cheaper to go to Home Depot and get the universal weather stripping that is self adhesive and installing that. highdesertranger
With the windows and doors closed, most outside air comes in through the HVAC ducts, even when the fan is off. So switch it to Max AC. That closes the intake. And when you start the van on freezing morning, keep it on Max AC so it recirculates interior air instead of sucking in outside air. Just turn the temperature way up.
(11-03-2017, 09:48 PM)MrNoodly Wrote: [ -> ]With the windows and doors closed, most outside air comes in through the HVAC ducts, even when the fan is off. So switch it to Max AC. That closes the intake. And when you start the van on freezing morning, keep it on Max AC so it recirculates interior air instead of sucking in outside air. Just turn the temperature way up.

What he said^^^!

Also some vehicles have a separate button for recirc, so you can set to heat and recirc instead of max AC.

It will have a logo something like this...

[Image: a_c_glove_box.gif]

As for drafts elsewhere, use a dollar bill and a thin shopping or dry cleaning bag...

You close your doors with the dollar bill laying across the seal and tug it gently. If it is slipping out easily, you have a "dead spot" in your seal.
You might need to open/close the doors a few times and check at different spots.

Take the walmart bag and cut out one rectangular panel from one side of the bag, about the size of a sheet of copier paper.
Next cut strips length wise about 1/2" wide in the bag, leaving one end uncut. 
You are creating a curtain of long thin streamers.
Tape the uncut end along a wire coat hanger so the streamers hang down.
With your vehicle closed and all vents closed and any fans or HVAC off, hang the streamer curtain in front of vents, fans, doors, etc and hold still to let air settle.
Look for any movement or blowing.

I did this around my house to find air leaks and to aim the adjustable vents on my wall mount Mitsubishi AC/Heat units to eliminate deadspots.

For fixing door issues, check Amazon for "D" shaped self-adhesive rubber weather stripping.
More durable, less absorbent than the foam stuff. 
The problem with caulk is it's not meant to be an "active" seal, in areas that open/close.
It is meant for sealing fixed gaps.
You might be able to lay down a bead, let it cure and use it like weatherstripping, but other products will do a better job.
(11-03-2017, 07:07 PM)dualhammers Wrote: [ -> ]Anyone who has had drafty vans how did you solve that problem? Waking up to a van that is 36 degrees inside is no fun, and I think a big issue is cold air rushing in during the night after my heater has done its work and I've gone to bed.

Does standard weather stripping and caulk work on van doors?

As others have said, test for air leaks and fix what you can but the biggest 'air leak' of all is not faulty weatherstripping or air coming in vents, it's windows and metal walls.

If you were in a house and turned off all the heat overnight when it's cold outside, the inside temperature will drop considerably by morning. It's no different in a van.

If you're sleeping in thermals (which if it's that cold outside you should be, you'll be warm enough in the van for long enough to fire up the heater again, crawl back in to the warm bed and snuggle in the bed clothes for 10 minutes. The van will be warm enough for you to get up and get dressed.
Also, heavy bulkhead curtain between driving compartment and sleeping compartment and/or insulated window coverings on the large windows.
Glass windshields and passenger windows get cold even when air isn't flowing this sets up natural convection currents.
I have a large single pane fixed window from the 50's in my house that is sealed air tight but if you hold your hand near the bottom there is a "draft" from the cold air coming down the window.
Mine is pretty drafty, too. But I like and need the fresh air. A van doesn't have much cubic space and the air can get real stale after a few hours of being closed tight. In fact, I nearly always have the windows or roof vent open a crack in all weather. Been down to 10°F in this van, but I got to admit I prefer above freezing temps. It's going to be time to head south soon.

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