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Full Version: Elderly budget care-campground plus. Who would be interested?
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(02-09-2018, 10:44 PM)Annie W Wrote: [ -> ]Thank God ! - We need more people with your kind of Attitude. Smile
One of the factors that makes me hesitant to attend an RTR is encountering people that don't, & therefore can't, MOVE like they used to - be that in soul or mind or body. Personally, am allergic to 'old' anythings.


Oh, you mean like Bob and the 90% of the rest of us on here? Yeah, I'd say you better not attend.
Was responding to this person:
MrNoodly Wrote:
One thing that gives me the creeps about retirement communities, "active seniors" communities, assisted living facilities or nursing homes is being surrounded only by other old people. I don't want to spend my last years segregated that way. So if there were to be some type of assisted living campground, I'd want to have younger people around too. I mean, I've been glad to see something besides other geezers at RTR the past few years. It sure beats listening to old farts talk about their great-grandkids, health problems and the good old days. Of course, younger people probably don't want to listen to that stuff either, so there would need to be incentives.


Annie W Wrote: Thank God ! - We need more people with your kind of Attitude. [Image: smile.gif]
One of the factors that makes me hesitant to attend an RTR is encountering people that don't, & therefore can't, MOVE like they used to - be that in soul or mind or body. Personally, am allergic to 'old' anythings.

Posted by Cammalu - 1 hour ago
Oh, you mean like Bob and the 90% of the rest of us on here? Yeah, I'd say you better not attend.
====
Actually I perceive Bob Wells to be a young-at-heart Humanitarian soul, akin to myself, - incldg. this lady he recorded just today:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XonAx8vQQg "Grannie Jo who lives in a nice, older Dodge Class B and has fallen in love with the nomadic life! She wasn't content to sit at home and wait for the Raper to come after her! NO, instead she chased after life to live it to its fullest and with all the joy and gusto she can muster--which is plenty" - I much enjoy meeting, & becoming friends with such naturally enthusiastic folk. - Too, Bob has such Vision, as he described here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UdqzBiQbv8

you say that "90% of the rest of us on here" are from the above so different ? - Then what of all the YOUNG people, who are building, &/or wanting to live in the 'Tiny house' movement, - which is actually what connected me too to Bob on u-tube. We all share the same planet, so we can all learn from one another, & help each other Enjoy life more Abundantly... & to the fullest. Okay ? Wink
My advice on location would be to look at AZ. I am the Personal Care Assistant for my adult son with Down syndrome in Kansas. When I leave KS, the pay will stop which I accept, and I will continue to care for him versus "dumping" him in one of the programs here. I have looked at other states and most have a waiting list, AZ is one of the few exceptions and rated as the best when it comes to Medicaid services. Does "best" mean anything when it comes to services, well, at least there isn't a waiting list. In NM, to get any services for my son, they said the waiting list was 10 years long, so setting up there at an Escapees Co-Op was out of the question, I'll be pretty old in 10 years and there is no guarantee it will only be 10 years. There is always the possibility of "crisis" funding and getting services, but it has to be a pretty desperate situation. Here, both our disabled and elderly fall under the same department, same sorry department of the state. I suspect the Medicaid waivers are probably handled pretty much in the same way. Budgets are tight in most states, and priorities...................

The states have a LOT of rules. Even Escapees has a point where they "draw the line" with care. I have been in RV parks long term where seniors were just living after they had finished traveling. Neighbors looked after them informally, checking up on them and helping out. Care workers can come in to assist, when the funds are available with the state and the need established.

I have always liked being around older people, especially those that traveled even when I was younger, and their conversations weren't centered around their latest surgery, medication and grandkids, but the memories of having LIVED and the life lessons they had learned. Everyone has a story, and I don't mind listening.
The Pennsylvania Lottery is proud to generate funds for vital
programs that benefit older Pennsylvanians. It remains
the only state lottery to dedicate all proceeds to benefits for
older residents.

NEARLY $27 BILLION IN BENEFITS
FUNDING SINCE 1972

http://www.aging.pa.gov/publications/ben...ns2017.pdf
Did Bob get a haircut???


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(02-09-2018, 09:54 PM)MrNoodly Wrote: [ -> ]One thing that gives me the creeps about retirement communities, "active seniors" communities, assisted living facilities or nursing homes is being surrounded only by other old people. I don't want to spend my last years segregated that way. So if there were to be some type of assisted living campground, I'd want to have younger people around too. I mean, I've been glad to see something besides other geezers at RTR the past few years. It sure beats listening to old farts talk about their great-grandkids, health problems and the good old days. Of course, younger people probably don't want to listen to that stuff either, so there would need to be incentives.

Well rest easy young man I am only 69
(02-10-2018, 09:35 AM)Cammalu Wrote: [ -> ]Did Bob get a haircut???

shave and a haircut 6 bits? costs a bit more these days lol,, hey babe
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Has anyone checked out California based Medical programs? California throws big time money at social services programs with medical being one of the largest. People travel from all over the U.S. to partake of these programs. Some other states even pay to have folks relocate to California for this very reason...

http://www.dhcs.ca.gov/services/medi-cal...ision.aspx

btw, I've had friends who lived on small 23' sail boats in Dana Point and Oceanside Harbors who received these care benefits, program even paid to have their hulls scraped and cleaned monthly..
I guess my idea lacked detail. I am not seeking a job, am happily retired and want to stay that way.

I would be interested in exploring the concept of moving to such a compound since I already enjoy the camper lifestyle. I thought one of the contributions I could make to the community was my nursing experience. I am only interested in a state license in order to secure mal practice insurance. This due to the possible litigious nature of some families of other residents there. No money exchanged for service. Something along the lines of a kibbutz, a community with those who can, helping those with more needs.

If paid help is always brought in, it would be just another retirement community.
(02-11-2018, 12:20 PM)Genie Wrote: [ -> ]If paid help is always brought in, it would be just another retirement community.

If the person in need is able to choose caretakers, it keeps the patient in control.
This is a huge difference from the normal assisted living models with built-in staffing.

Were you a neighbor offering to help me for free, I would decline your help with hands-on care.
The setup becomes one of servitude in reverse.
You will not stand for a paid aide to show up three hours late, but a volunteer...or an aide that built-in to the facility, there is little choice in the matter.
Same thing in personal habits. If ones perfume or post-smoking aroma bothers the patient, most would feel funny about bringing it up if they are being cared for for free.


The role of a good nurse living in house is...having someone to check out that pressure sore...Genie, do you think it is healing well?
What do you think of the nurse telling me XXXXXXX symptom is just natural aging?
Or the inevitable idiot caregiver, who is taking advantage of someone less able to see it or too scared to speak up.
What about those emergencies when the aide just did not show up?
This
is where your presence and efforts would be priceless.
Kind of like an in-house watchdog/advocate, you know?
In a regular assisted living situation, even a retired nurse is not taken seriously.

In the spot I envision, someone like you would carry a big stick and be taken very seriously. (The home care companies would quickly learn this as well, giving "herd immunity" to many common problems experienced in home care scenarios.)

Think about it.
A nurse can give 10 baths and wrap a few wounds every week, helping out a few people.
If the same nurse lets the paid help deal with that, they can do a lot more good making sure all the people are getting their needs met in a good way.
Even the paid nurses that were mediocre, would quickly learn not to cut corners with those in your field of view.
In my mind, that is the magic core of this idea. Wink
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