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   If I spend the time and money to do a proper job insulating the walls, floor, and roof of my cargo van is it going to make that much of a difference ?  I'll be rocking a Mr Buddy.  Would proper insulation really save me quite a bit of propane ?

 Whenever I use Mr Buddy I have to crack the roof vent a lil bit to avoid co2 buildup, so does that negate the benefits of insulation ?  Keep in mind that I won't be staying in areas with freezing temps.. the lowest temp I'll be dealing with will be around 45F. 

Any advice is appreciated.



4x4tour

I have the little buddy one and even it is too hot.  I wish I would have kept a smaller coleman one that was the size of CD, yet kept the van warm in 45 degree temps.  My buddy heater cranks, but I wouldnt need it unless it was in the 30's outside.

BUT,  the summer will heat radiate in the van like an oven.  I used reflectex on the rear side windows and then added 1/2 inch sheets of R-Tech afterwards for the walls.

It makes a huge difference for hot days.    




Paint color and insulation will make a huge difference in terms of heat gain. Shade will help immensely. If you can park in the shade your vehicle will never get warmer than the ambient temperature, say 95. In strong sun, your vehicle interior could reach 130.

White is probably the best (most reflective) color for the exterior. Try painting several pieces of scrap metal, white, some middle color like light blue, and black. Put them in the sun for an hour. check their temps.

Insulation will really help with heat loss in the cold. This can not only save you money, but in the event of fuel loss/heat malfunction, could save your life.

Elseanno

where do you folks get the best deal on the bubble insulation that's covered with foil or white. and what are most people using the "double bubble" or single. it looks llike the double is up the 3/8 thick.

best price i have found is $25.51/shipped for a 4' X 10' piece, double bubble and foil covered.
http://www.acehardwaresuperstore.com/444-reflective-energy-barrier/17188.html

True refletex( registered brand name) is available St lowe's home improvement stores. There are also water heater " jackets" that are sold that are the same material, but different brand name. Some stores may have end of the season sales on windshield sun blockers that are similar material. The trick to reflected is to remember that it has very little insulating properties, something like r1.5 or so. But it will reflect heat in or out, or cold in or out. Most turn the foil side to the exterior of the vehicle, to help control the inside temp. For example, my bus is dark green, has a steel outer skin, 1,5" of white styrofoam ( old fashioned coffee cup style) and an aluminum inner skin. You can burn your skin on the outside on a hot sunny day, and hold your hand to the inside skin for a bit. The inside temp has gone upwards of 140 with all windows closed A roof vent has helped some, and im looking for the tinted window visors to allow me to keep the front windows down an inch or so. When time allows, a white roof paint job is planned, should lower temps at least 10-15 degrees.I have reflectex for the front windshield and two front side windows. I havnt run the buddy heater yet.
Les
the stuff in the link i posted has a R value of "up to" 14.3, "depending on application". maybe because it's the double bubble??
Insulation will make a huge difference! This is for a 23' RV, I keep saying I am going to do it every winter... have not yet! (3rd year here at "The Oasis"). It is a Tioga, cheaply made... was inexpensive. In winter time a hurricane generally blows when I open the cabinets! I have some corner tape I will put up...
I bought some plastic sheets to copy the windows insulation kits they sell. That will be one step, but then during the day will not be able to open those windows! (single pane). The cold here is at night. I use a Kozy World double plate (10,000BTU catalytic heater... total overkill but too late!). The big problem is the wind coming through the engine compartment! Last year I draped a blanket over it, (inside), no good! This year since my 12x14 Montana Canvas tent has blown away and destroyed by a 100mph micro burst (they say, I was not here!) I am going to use it's vinyl flooring and somehow drape the front outside of the cab! Maybe drive over it a few feet and then drape it. I don't care what it looks like and I rarely move the RV anyhow. I don't know how I am going to attach the top part! Ropes maybe? Velcro is out... too windy it gets. Maybe close the doors over them after folding the vinyl in! Will let you know... should be interesting. I would do it now but it is almost 100 outside...

Be well... always.

Ara & Spirit

www.theoasisofmysoul.com
Elseanno Wrote:Paint color and insulation will make a huge difference in terms of heat gain. Shade will help immensely. If you can park in the shade your vehicle will never get warmer than the ambient temperature, say 95. In strong sun, your vehicle interior could reach 130.

White is probably the best (most reflective) color for the exterior. Try painting several pieces of scrap metal, white, some middle color like light blue, and black. Put them in the sun for an hour. check their temps.

Insulation will really help with heat loss in the cold. This can not only save you money, but in the event of fuel loss/heat malfunction, could save your life.

Elseanno

You mean if I get a white van it will stay cooler than a black van? This may take a while but heck Id do it!
Pure white is the way to go. When I lived on a sailboat my deck was white and I could go barefooted in the extreme heat. Other sailboats that were even just slightly off white, we had to wear deck shoes! Incredible difference. Reason why all the cars in Florida are white! (just about!).

Ara & Spirit

www.theoasisofmysoul.com
My .02:

Insulation will make a huge difference. In cold weather, it will take less fuel to get the interior warm, and less fuel to keep it warm. Eventually a savings in $$$. Insulation can be done less expensively (not up on current prices) than the foil bubble wrap. The foil is only going to be helpful if you are going to use the reflective value of it at a window.  Insulation is also dependent on the door and window rubber seals being in good shape. Insulation will also aid in hot weather. More below.

Reflectivity: relectivy isn't what directly keeps a vehicle cool. Dark shades absorb light, which in turn causes the dark material to retain, then radiate, heat. I'd be less concerned about the exterior color of the car, as long as you insulated the interior well. Then, if the exterior metal gets hot, the insulation will keep the heat from radiating into the interior. What's more important is the interior color of the vehicle, combined with how much direct sunlight is getting inside. You can use these two factors to help control the interior temp.

If you want to warm the interior on a cold day, use a dark interior and park in the sunlight. Especially with materials such as carpet, the sunlight will be absorbed and the material will get warm, and radiate heat to the interior (greenhouse effect). Good insulation will help retain the warmth longer, once there is no direct sunlight. To stop the material from acting as a heater, put a reflective surface over the windows to reflect the light back outside, so there will be no warming effect inside. Black the the light, block the heat. We use white ABS sheet plastic velcroed over the windows. In cold weather, we can place insulating material between the plastic and the glass to help retain heat inside at night.

To paint the outside white is - IMO - a waste of money, unless you're going to have no insulation. Cheaper to insulate, use a dark interior and the windows as 'controls', and choose a parking location depending on whether you wish to heat the interior (park in sun with windows unblocekd) or keep it cool (park in shade with reflectors/ insulated reflectors in the window).

There is no such thing as 'cold': there is only a lack of heat. Science 101 lol.

Just my thoughts on the matter.

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