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I am in the planning stages for a DIY camping van conversion.  On the east coast with lots of  humidity. Rather than doing a super job on insulation and a water vapor barrier, I was thinking of using a flexible close cell foam with magnets that I can put in and remove. Plus a fan and a couple of butterfly vents. In looking at foam options, I saw neoprene and thought it might be a good choice. In all of my research I haven’t seen anyone do anything like this so I am hoping for some feedback.  I know neoprene is more costly than other foam options, but the flexibility seems worth it.
Of course something is better than nothing.

But the key is a sealed envelope, no missed gaps, preventing any thermal infiltration around the edges.

I suppose overlapping and lots of strong magnets may do it, but hard to visualize.

Also need to cut your ventilation openings first.

generically, "closed cell elastomeric flexible sheeting", many industrial uses in building construction, mainly for pipes and HVAC ducting

Neoprene Foam, EPDM Foam, SBR Foam, EPDM/SBR Blended Foam or EPT Ethylene Propylene Terpolymer

Brands: Ensolite, K-Flex Insul-Sheet

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I would stick to rigid foam, ideally polyiso,

cut precisely so it just fits against each other, maybe velcro in spots where needed to hold up against the metal

too thick for even super magnets?

and cover with Glidden Gripper + duck canvas to strengthen and protect it when removing / reinstalling.

See tnttt.com "foamie" subforum
neoprene doesnt look thick enough to insulate. I would also go with the rtech foam insulation. Its thicker but the insulation it provides is the real deal. But to make it removable you might have to reinforce it with cardboard so it doesnt fall apart when removing it. 
They sell industrial velcro that has double sided tape, can hold up to 10 pounds, will easily hold foam.

I run a swampcooler in my van year round and never had any problems with water/vapor/mold inside my van, the rtech foam seems to be resistant to that.
I would also keep in mind that neoprene is NOT UV resistant at all. highdesertranger
(08-26-2018, 06:47 AM)John61CT Wrote: [ -> ]But the key is a sealed envelope, no missed gaps, preventing any thermal infiltration around the edges.
But there are still air vents allowing thermal infiltration/exfiltration.
Yes of course, there should be **lots** of ventilation, much more than they build in.

But that is controlled, turned on and off as desired.

What I'm talking about is eliminating as much as possible any uncontrolled gaps in the insulation envelope, not just convection but conduction, thermal bridging.

Get a thermal infrared camera in very cold weather, fire a Mr Buddy up for 30 min and you can see all the places where the heat is escaping the fastest.
Neoprene like in a wet suit is fairly heavy. Camping mats might be lighter. under my carpet i used those interlocking floor mats that they use in shops and garages. I glued them down and together. My thinking was that I would be on my knees and didn't want a hard floor, and those mats would hold less moisture if there ever was a spill.
Neoprene comes in both open cell and closed cell versions so be careful what you get if you do decide to go that route.

Truthfully, after 40+ years of owning vans all over the continent, vapor barrier is grossly overrated. You are far better off planning on opening the doors and windows to allow for exchange of air than trying to plan and install a vapor barrier.

I tried unsuccessfully to find the R value for closed cell neoprene. If any one can supply it rated by the thickness of the neoprene it can then be compared to more commonly used insulation materials on a cost/value basis.
(08-26-2018, 08:34 PM)Almost There Wrote: [ -> ]If any one can supply it rated by the thickness of the neoprene it can then be compared to more commonly used insulation materials on a cost/value basis.

Does this Foam Factory site answer any of the questions?
Nope!

Drilling down to the data sheets for closed cell neoprene yielded all kinds of interesting data but nothing on the R value.

I suspect it's kind of low unless you add layer upon layer and then the weight of it becomes a negative factor. Wet suits are heavy!!
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