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You have $8500 to your name and need a pickup.
You have decided to buy a Silverado. You are in the lot on auction end day and have decided on one of these two.
Color is not important to you...you could be happy with either one of them.

One with 15,808 miles, is going to sell for $6779.
https://gsaauctions.gov/gsaauctions/auci...CI19100013

The other, with 47,700 miles, can be bought for $4,000.
https://gsaauctions.gov/gsaauctions/auci...CI19100006

They have had the same upkeep and job. (Moving furniture for Vets and being used to haul groceries and navy supplies.)
Are 32,000 miles worth the $2800 more in this case...or should you jump on the 4K truck with 47K on it?
I put in a lot of miles, so I would gladly pay more for the one with lower mileage on it.
I'd lean more toward the higher mileage and lower price. Past experience with high mileage vehicles has convinced me that proper maintenance is the most important factor and regular use is better than sitting for long periods. Also, 47,700 miles isn't very high.
I don’t like the rust marks on the rear bumper of the silver one so I would pay the extra 2800 for the white one also I think 32000 is worth 2800. AT 47000 you will be looking at brakes and tires soon
(03-16-2019, 01:19 PM)tonyandkaren Wrote: [ -> ]...proper maintenance is the most important factor...


There are parts that aren't maintenance items and have a limited life due to wear and age. For example, When I bought my van it had 115K miles on it and everything worked perfectly. But six years later, at 250+K miles, my engine mounts rotted, some steering linkage parts have been replaced, as well as some high-pressure hoses. New shock absorbers twice, new brake rotors... It's like the human body. The older you get the more frequently things need to get worked on and a bigger deal it is to fix it. So I'm a fan of starting with a younger vehicle whenever possible.

But, hey, the engine and transmission are still going strong. Knock on wood.
A long time ago, I bought a 1985 Dodge Caravan 4 cylinder 2 years old, with 119,000 miles for $5000. My FIL showed me a different 2 year old 1985 Dodge Caravan with 29,000 mile for $10,000. I chose the high mileage one and drove it for another 110,000 miles. I was able at that point to sell it for $1500, so how much would the other van have been worth with 139,000 miles.....certainly not much more than $2500, so I would have lost $3500 in depreciation.

To the OP, They are basically the same truck, get the higher mileage one (which is historically, still a low mileage truck)...47,000 miles is just broken in.
I'd take either one of them. I ran the crap out of a couple of 2007 GMC Work Truck Sierras and neither had a single problem. Great vehicles...
(03-16-2019, 07:49 PM)StarliteRambler Wrote: [ -> ]I'd take either one of them. I ran the crap out of a couple of 2007 GMC Work Truck Sierras and neither had a single problem. Great vehicles...

A 2007 with only 15K on it? A little over 1000 miles a year? Could driving a truck too little be a problem?
(03-19-2019, 06:24 PM)cortttt Wrote: [ -> ]A 2007 with only 15K on it? A little over 1000 miles a year? Could driving a truck too little be a problem?


The way they are maintained in the pool? Not usually.

Some of the more "varnish" tanks have popped a fuel pump later on, but besides specific bugs each model is well known for, there have been very few issues with the low miles GSA stuff.
Both are over the prices, the low milage is over $8k & the reserve isn't even met. I do agree with the concept of each type & brand of vehicles with proper care should last X number of miles. The 4 busses I posted end today & I found a 1992 ambulance with 56k IDI diesel for $3k, not as nice as mine but still a good deal & a freightliner 14' alum box truckwith 35k with a 12v Cummins. All pre computer!
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